Esther Tim Westwood Richard Hamilton Luigi De Meyer Jonathan Amos James Reynolds Charles Peterson Sundays Sebastian Asher Saturdays Samir Hashmi Prince Mohammed Mike Thomson Mike Thompson Newton Nicky Mcgrath Matt Mcgrath Tommy Luigi John Mcgill Jim Carlson Giles Pete Eric Esther Charles Havilland Celia Hatton Angela Merkel Italy Mumbai Catalonia Vietnam Spain Europe Madrid London United States Saudi Arabia Germany Congo Barcelona Westminster Warsaw Uk Syria Sina Rome Petro Peterson Kasai Japan Iraq India Fillmore Elphinstone East London Disney Columbus City Of Adelaide California Caesar Britain Bangladesh Bali Baghdad Asia Amman Alaska

Global News Podcast 2017-09-29:15:14.00
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  • This is the B.B.C. for details of a complete range of programmes go to B.B.C. world service dot com forward slash, Come to the latest global news recorded at thirteen hours, on Friday, the twenty ninth of September.

  • This is Andrew peach, with a selection of highlights from across B.B.C. world service news today coming up tensions between Madrid and the Spanish region of Catalonia continued to escalate out of Sunday's planned independence referendum, the Catalan leader, urges the E.U. to defend his people's rights.

  • When I thought, I'm going to start yapping about somehow, the government of Catalonia was prepared for all the difficulties that this referendum would face from the Spanish state, with its excessive and abuse of deployment to police also in the podcast, many people are feared drowned after the sinking of a boat carrying Muslims fleeing violence in me, and mark are prominent Vietnamese bankers been sentenced to death.

  • At the end of a mass corruption trial there, and the technology entrepreneur, e. lon mask unveils plans to colonise Mars using rockets.

  • They could also revolutionise transport on earth, I wake up.

  • And what do you think the pewter, you can be great, and that's what being a space stations all about.

  • It's about believing in the future, and thinking that the future would be, other than the past, and I can't think of anything more exciting, then going up there, and being among Stars.

  • But first, the regional President of Catalonia has criticised the European Union for not speaking up about what he sees as breaches of fundamental rights in the Spanish government attempts to thwart an independence referendum this Sunday carnage pooed Amman also accused the authorities in Madrid have impeding freedom of expression and Assembly and deploying the police in an excessive and abusive way, when I thought, I'm going to start yapping about somehow, the government of Catalonia was prepared for all the difficulties that this referendum would face from the Spanish state, with its excessive and abuse of deployment to police, so everything is ready so that, in effect, more than two thousand polling places have the voting slips have the ballot boxes and have all that they need.

  • So the people can express their opinion, Madrid insist the referendum is illegal on Spain's constitutional Court has suspended it, my colleague, damn Damon spoke to our correspondent Tom burridge was in Catalonia and asked him for the latest there is this evening, supposedly the kind of end of election campaign event from from the yes side, the pro independence camp, but I don't think you can really cool.

  • What we've seen over the last few weeks, anything, akin to a normal election campaign, hasn't really seen no real evidence of that.

  • There's the odd poster around Barcelona.

  • But then a pro independence poster, but then sort of covered over by a unionist or pro Spanish poster.

  • A few hours Later, you know this, this is a sort of strange dynamic, which has been developing in the Catalan imprint of movement have been pushing the Spanish central government for an independence referendum for years now, about five years since two thousand twelve when huge amounts of people took to the streets of Barcelona, in favour of independence and were really reaching a critical moment.

  • Over the next few hours, this is going to begin to play out.

  • So, at the end of the school day.

  • Today, in theory, I've been speaking to people, this morning, he was saying, actually parent groups in schools around Catalonia are now sort of trying to work out how they can keep school's open, because they're worried that the police are going to try and clip posed the schools and the schools are crucial because the pro independence.

  • What movements and the local government.

  • Here the devolved government want to use the schools as polling stations, the organisation of the unofficial voting will be done a lot of it on the Internet.

  • Won't it.

  • Yeah, I mean, what the Spanish state has been doing my respects to Spanish government last night, we interviewed a government, Minister, the got the Spanish government is claiming that all of the action taken by the police is driven by an independent judge at the behest of Spain's Attorney general, but I think it is at the trip proved the claim that such decisions are not heaps in politics.

  • When It comes to such a sense of what we've seen over the last few weeks, he's Spanish police Spanish national police arresting Catalan officials seizing election material raiding the off, he's of the Catalan government, and the, if the Spanish government has had a difficult balancing act.

  • I think it what it what it's been trying to do is basically trying to strangle the ability of the government here to actually push ahead and carry out this pole in a credible way on Sunday, but at the same time, not trying to over push there, and obviously, what it fears, he's a backlash.

  • I mean, what if writing is that in Barcelona's port at the moment are two huge cruise ships, and I talked about the bizarre earlier, but listen to this on one of the cruise ships, there is a massive giant picture of Tweetie pie.

  • Yes, you some talk about Disney small yellow bird, but on on board.

  • Those two cruise ships are not tourists.

  • There are thousands of national Spanish police are sitting in Barcelona's port, I think, you know, the implicit message is that they are the ultimate guarantors of Spain's territorial integrity, the Spanish, Catalan government says within forty eight hours after the vote, it could declare independence unilaterally from Spain.

  • The Spanish police, the Spanish state is working to stop that happening.

  • Tom borage reporting from Catalonia, at least sixty people are believed to have died with a boat carrying a hinge or Muslims Fling violence in me and ma sank in rough seas off Bangladesh, the international organisation for migration said twenty three people were confirmed dead and forty others were missing, presumed drowned there's Charles Havilland the sinking happen very close to the Bangladeshi coast, more than twenty bodies were initially recovered.

  • Many more people remain missing distraught families have already been giving the victim's traditional Muslim burials inside the overcrowded refugee camps, that are now home to more than half a million hinges who fled in the past month, they've been fleeing a military operation that began when henger militants attacked the posts of Burmese security forces.

  • Next to India, that's the sound from a mobile phone recording in this morning's rush hour at Elphinstone road, railway station in Mumbai, where at least twenty two people were killed in a crush when a crowd of commuters pushed on to a narrow footbridge many more were injured.

  • Samir Hashmi has been following the story for us in Mumbai, their parties are saying is that at nine A.M. in disa's local time in Mumbai.

  • It's started to rain very heavily, and a lot of people started digging the footbridge oddest foot bridge connects the railway station to the mean and because there are a lot of people on the footbridge it led to a Stampede.

  • This is the Office that is coming out at this point of time, though they have ordered an investigation to find out as to how many people you Know what really triggered this Stampede because it, it seems listing to the details you're giving a surprising that people would be so desperate to shelter from the rain, that they would clamber onto a footbridge in such large numbers that some people were crushed.

  • This station is located in, it's one of the main stations and central Mumbai, and there are a lot of officers in this locality.

  • So a lot of people get down on the station, use the footbridge to get away to the main road and then what could their officers at this point of time, they were also a lot of people that were waiting to get inside the cream that's way.

  • There was a lot of rush on the footbridge, because a lot of people were getting in and a lot of people were getting out, and this is the peak between it Ian in the morning in Mumbai, the local trains are really, really cold, it more than six million people used the local clean every day, who are travelling from home to work and go back home late in the evening.

  • So this was rush hour, but because a sky raining really heavily and the station's not too big.

  • The footbridge is also very narrow, not too many people can go up at the same of people can come down.

  • That's also one of these, and that could have led white authorities are getting do the stamping it certainly looks like a Pretty rickety structure.

  • Looking at the images we've now got and as well as people getting off the train and sheltering there are people trying to climb up the sides of the footbridge to get under it, it's at the footbridge actually used, and a lot of people generally, he was a footbridge.

  • In any case, this is, even though this is one of the busiest stations in Mumbai.

  • It's also one of the smallest and most congested once, and a lot of people and expose have been saying this for years, but mum by local stations, need to be upgraded, because there's just so many people use them every day, especially during rush hour, that it's really difficult to take that kind of, that's what happened today.

  • A lot of people.

  • We're going up, and then the will rain, maybe more people try to get on under the footbridge.

  • There's also one reporting that a few people fell down, because the floor was wet.

  • These are unconfirmed reports, but because one or two people fell down while climbing the stairs that also triggered in panic, due to which a lot of people, it led to a Stampede be with me from Mumbai, the main consultative body in Saudi Arabia has voted for women to be allowed to issue a religious rulings Dallas fatwas, for the first time, the shore Assembly overwhelmingly approved the recommendation just days after a major milestone for Sally women's rights for the lifting of the Ban on them, driving, here's Sebastian Asher it does seem to be momentum building for Saudi women.

  • At the moment, as the King in waiting Crown Prince Mohammed tries to adapt the country to face a range of economic and political challenges.

  • The vote by the surer Council is a small step, and in itself, not decisive a Royal decree is needed to create the role of women Mufti is to actually issue fatwas, but such a move would help modify the country's ultra conservative image, where it's male clerics fat was generally attract international criticism or even ridicule.

  • Often, when the pontificating on women's roles and rights technology entrepreneur, e. lon Mosca's unveil plans to send cargo ships to Mars.

  • In the next five years, and to use smaller rockets to carry people between major cities on earth.

  • Speaking at a conference in the Australian city of Adelaide my masks said, at least two cargo ships were placed power, mining and life support infrastructure on Mars.

  • He described why his company space x. was aiming for us to become a multi planet species, the future is vastly more exciting and interesting if we are spaced ranks.

  • I was Asian and a multi species that if we're not, you want to be inspired by things you wanna wake up.

  • And what do you think the piece would be great.

  • That's what being a space stations all about.

  • It's about believing in the future, and thinking that the future would rather Than the past, and I can't think of anything more exciting than going out there and being among stars passed our science correspondent Jonathan Amos whether this could all really happen, it's the driving force inside.

  • Ever since he started his rocket company space x. nine years ago, he's had this vision of going to Mars, not just himself, but taking an awful lot of people with him, and the rockets that he has on the drawing board.

  • They're huge, and they would take one hundred people at a time, and they would be totally re usable.

  • So, just like a jumbo jet that takes off lands somewhere else is refuelled and then takes off again.

  • That's exactly what these rockets would do that would substantially bring the price down of operating them, and that's what makes it possible, sorry, Sir, this is the kind of thing that any one can say it sounds good.

  • It's a sort of sci Fi got a quality to it, but some people, the world that he's living in serious space scientists are going, you know what he might actually be able to do this.

  • Here's a thing about musk is a visionary, yes, and he has a rock star fanbase because of that, but he has a track record as well, so not only has he launched these, he's Falcon rockets into space x. company are managed to land them, which many people were sceptical about at first, but he's also changed The view, I think of many people towards electric cars with is tessler company, and he's also got interests in in batteries.

  • And another renewables technology.

  • So when he says something people sit up, they take notice they take him seriously now.

  • Can he do it in the time lines that that he sets out in his various speeches and pronouncements enough everything in space, moves to the right, it's a, it's a common phrase, and it's true as well, with the long mask.

  • He doesn't quite stick to his time lines, but he does ten to get there in the end, whether he can do it on this occasion, I don't know, we'll see, but people take him seriously.

  • And even if people listening and thinking, well, I don't want to go and live on Mars are this isn't relevant, actually, the technology that's being developed for that purpose could have a huge impact on the length of flights here on earth.

  • Between cities, yeah, I mean, essentially, if he can make the rocket totally re usable and reliable, so that, just like when you climb the steps or go down the gangway into a seven four seven, you know, it's going to land at the other end, because, you know, it's done it so many millions of times before he can do that, then, yes, that type of travel would be realistic.

  • Our science correspondent Jonathan Amos, this is global news with the best stories, interviews, and on The spot reporting from the B.B.C. world service, don't forget every weekend, you can hear a review of the week's main stories and why they matter that's in our programme, the world, this week.

  • Let's find out more about it from John McGill this week, we're looking at battles for Independents Iraq's Kurds have voted for an independent state.

  • Despite furious opposition in Baghdad anxious neighbours with their own Kurdish minorities will block the move to already air links are being cut, but just how isolated can they afford to be women in Saudi Arabia took a massive step towards greater independence.

  • This week, when they finally got their hands on the car keys.

  • Once they're allowed to drive, will they be heading down a road to other basic freedoms.

  • Germany's Angela Merkel won a fourth term in Office, but only just now, she's lost much of her political independence, as she scrambles to put together a coalition.

  • It's a tough task.

  • So what will it mean for Germany and for the wider E.U., and there are Fiesta lush artistic Indonesian island of Bali might blow its top, we consider whether it's volcano is a curse, or actually a blessing in disguise.

  • That's all in the world.

  • This week, broadcast on Saturdays and Sundays and available to download of b. b. c. dot com slash programmes and huge corruption trial that's been followed closely in Vietnam, for months, has ended with the death sentence for a former banker who embezzled Millions of dollars, Asia Pacific editor Celia Hatton's been following the case more than seven hundred and twenty people I've testified and provided evidence for his trial and all centred around a Bank, which is partially state owned, it's partially owned by Petro Vietnam, which is the state petroleum company has a twenty percent stake in this big ocean Bank end really it boils down to the fact that the former Chairman of the Bank and the founder and many of the other defendants in the in this trial, more than at dozens of people who were being prosecuted.

  • We're Saatchi will be it embezzling money accepting bribes, or many of them were paying interest rates out to clients, there were far higher than than should have been allowed to around fifty thousand people were accepting interest rates, dead, then were far higher than necessary.

  • So this huge amount of money is really thought to have decimated this Bank, the founder is thought to have allowed the bad debts of this big to climb to more than six hundred million dollars.

  • So a huge case there, that's resulted in the death penalty for the former Chairman and many very serious prison sentences for her dozens of others, I guess.

  • This would be pretty big news in any country, but in in Vietnam.

  • It's in the context of the government making such a big deal about cracking down on corruption.

  • Absolutely, so the government has said that this is just one Of six serious cases that they're going to bring to trial.

  • Through the course of this year.

  • Just yesterday we have another major case starting involving another fifty defendants in which customs officials are accused of accepting bribes and really faking exports and allowing a fick taxes to be claimed her, so that's another big case that that that's starting that's really going to get a lot of headlines as well, but the public is asking you, does this mark a turning point in Vietnam is the government really invested in going after corruption or is this really just an African by one part of the government to really turn on its rivals in a lot of the part senior House and reporting to the world's worst refugee crisis, not Syria, but the democratic Republic of Congo, where violence in the Grand ca.

  • Sire region has forced almost one and a half million people to escape it began last year with clashes between a militia group and Congolese government forces.

  • Since then, several other armed factions or become involved have been hundreds of extra judicial killings and the widespread use of child soldiers.

  • Here's our correspondent Mike Thompson Newton Nicky where did a gig we were taken by surprise by the way it broke out suddenly in the Middle of the night, about five A.M., there was some really strong explosions and we only ran into the Bush sixty five year old Raymond and preferred not to give his full Name lost two of his grandchildren him with desperate flight from his village near the town of can manga in Kasai southern Congo, but open when we get, we're just running into the forest.

  • We didn't know where we were, we were just running for our lives.

  • Months later, hundreds of thousands of people like Raymond continue to hide in the forest.

  • Violence has pushed your groups of children when communities to clear from their furniture's into the Bush, he Fillmore of the U.N. children's charity Unicef the living conditions in the Bush was extremely difficult.

  • With limited exercise to afford limited access to water, no sanitation and also shown have been dying, you do local health services with malaria and nutrition, taking their toll of those in the forests, some had taken shelter in the region's few remaining health centres, more than two hundred of which have been destroyed, Esther, but a Bull fled her village, after to have her children were abducted last year by a militia group that were required the bone image of object of my children aware on their way home from school, when they were stopped by suddenly show men and told to go without him a on one I've great discovered what had happened to them.

  • I couldn't eat, I couldn't sleep.

  • According to give in.

  • You think I was Eric Esther has heard nothing from them.

  • Since, and now, fears for the safety of her other three children shown amazing dimmer when You had it Caesar what hoping to make all your guests to have children.

  • I have him to lead the others out of my sight and saw, woody, why the children, you can hear at this centre run by Unicef were rescued from roaring militia groups.

  • Three hundred and fifty local schools destroyed and four hundred thousand youngsters a risk of severe malnutrition some willing recruits.

  • After several desperate for months in the Bush, fighting disease sixty five year old Raymond has now returned to his village to rebuild, but I am skint is the Congolese army there to protect them.

  • This time it's a Club, where do you think the fellow was the military, we're doing all the killing before, and they're all around us.

  • So, yes, the people who did this pink's are here locals say mass grave has been discovered very close to a Congolese army checkpoint as the killing continues mother of five Esther by dinner Bull has this simple wish you're banging no bounds.

  • And when you look, we want to mock me in about a bang.

  • I only have one hope in when I just want me and my children to leave, I ask for nothin what now.

  • We just want to leave in peace, Esther, but in a ending that report from Mike Thomson Italy must hold a general election by the spring of next year, one of the main party leaders will be thirty one year old, Luigi de Meyer, the currents, Deputy speaker of Italy's lower House, he's been chosen to take the populist five star movement into the vote, the movement, which was founded in two thousand mime is running, close to the governing democratic party in current opinion polls are Italy correspondent James Reynolds has gone to see the movement's new leader, not man, your friend that me land of it, Luigi de Meyer steps onto the stage to accept his movements nomination as candidate for Prime Minister.

  • Five years ago, he was a University drop out working, I her web start now the thirty one year old swans to convince, Italy, that he is ready to lead the entire country.

  • I met him at his parliamentary Office in Rome, he is strikingly polite and well dressed on a side table.

  • There's a framed copy of the financial times.

  • Front page, featuring his photo assigned, that being the centre of international attention is still a novelty.

  • Some countries have a minimum age for leadership, for example, the United States has a minimum of thirty five of being President, you're thirty one, do you have enough experience to lead a major country you joining on on awful to Aldo, but he's in debt is sort of what young people are not the future are dead, the precedent, the other people who can change our country with their energy and innovation.

  • When I went to your Parliament in Westminster, I found that senior officials were maximum fifty year storm which was Normal, they contrast, there will be considered extremely young in Italy.

  • That's what we also have to change.

  • Where's forget them, but one of Italy's over fifties shows no desire to step aside five stars, but they did love is a professional comedian and amateur singer, he remains the movements loudest voice, a point I put to Luigi dimeo you've been chosen as the leader of the five star movements, but the found that their pick it in, though, is still the dominant figure will you be taking instructions from him.

  • Go and see him, then I checked my dipper good us advice will always be welcome, but I've always said that this is the movement, which is based on the actions of the members themselves.

  • And that will continue the decisions they take will be show, with all of the movement.

  • And, above all, with city says, who wish to join our project, and what I'm offered, but you were still brought it in recent years.

  • In Europe, there has been a wave of populous parties and also a nationalist parties five star identify with those other movements in Europe under your door bend saw them.

  • When I think of which political model to follow.

  • I think of the country in northern Europe, which are spending money on health and the environment.

  • I don't look to follow the emerging extreme left wing of the extreme right wing parties in Europe means that you've talked about renegotiating Italy's role Within the European Union, and, if possible, at the end, having a referendum on the, would you like to go one step further and take Italy, out of the European Union, like Britain, but it'll do.

  • Oh, my talk first fault, we've never said as five star that we wanted to leave the European Union with always said that we want to remain inside the European Union and reform it from within.

  • Whatever it comes out like that.

  • So how unusual is it for Italy to have such a young contender your van.

  • You're seen Sina teaches political history at Rome's Luis University, it is absolutely stunning.

  • But if you look at Italian history.

  • In the last twenty five years, this can be very easily me you tell s been consuming political class and nowadays, you need Sally turn experience is more of a liability than a resort, the fact that he doesn't have an experience is good for many Italians, because this means, he's not painted with corruption, or whatever.

  • James Reynolds in Italy, hundreds of marine species native to the seas around Japan had been discovered off the West coast of the United States, researchers say they were swept across the Pacific ocean by the Japanese tsunami.

  • Six years ago, doctor, Jim Carlson, from the University of Oregon described what they found, we have just an extraordinary diversity of marine life are typical of the Japanese coast, sea stars starfish sea anemones crabs quarrels Ange's molluscs.

  • The Warsaw, It's mussels and clams, or just a startling variety of species, many of which we had no idea could rattle across an ocean would let alone, nearly seven thousand Columbus had motion how science correspondent Matt McGrath Tommy more about how the creatures travel, the Japanese government estimated that about five million tonnes of debris was washed into the sea.

  • As a result of the earthquake and tsunami in twenty eleven among that was a huge amount of plastic and fibreglass or material there, don't decompose.

  • Many of these enterprising creatures on the Japanese Chlo..

  • Coast grabbed onto these particular pieces of debris, and because they travel so slowly.

  • The creatures were actually able to colonise the seaweeds and the clams and the mussels, they're able to colonise these particular pieces of debris and going slowly.

  • They weren't washed off, they were able to reproduce and five, six, seven years later, six years later, they've arrived on the coast of the stairs, and they're still arriving and, as such, just one or two, it's hundreds of thousands of individuals and about almost three hundred species of scientists of the affluence of her, so it's taken a long time to get there.

  • It's amazing.

  • In a way, it's taken us so long to notice it was Attlee, I think, actually happening, so he was one of the things that people didn't recognise them, they put all the pieces of information together, he found about three hundred species, they reckon the hundreds Of other species actually have turned up as well.

  • What they haven't found yet in evidence of that these invasive species have colonised the area.

  • I think the belief is that they probably will, because it's you.

  • Remember, it's going from Alaska down to California.

  • It's a huge expanse of coastline and hundreds of thousands of visuals, which have proved themselves very dealt in very good at surviving on the last, and for you, Sir, good news from that point of view, bad news from other points of view.

  • In terms of the oceans or becoming a bit more homogenised.

  • Yeah, I think so.

  • Absolutely the role of plastic and this again.

  • We've seen another use for plastic as if we didn't have enough of them already, I think, Santa's a quant quite concerned about this developed because they haven't really seen this before, whereas creatures are taking advantage of the plastic that's in the ocean to basically spread quickly around the world, and we were used to invasive species on boats among oil tankers and things like that, when they're using debris.

  • There can travel slowly, but in very large quantities around the world, it's got big implications.

  • I think, for front to the front with that species travel on the world, our science correspondent McGrath.

  • Now, let's talk about pirate radio stations, which had been a big influence on the British music scene, especially in the nineteen eighties broadcasting illegally from hidden venues many D.J.s were playing new Music today, their contribution is celebrated in a new B.B.C. television programme, one of the people in it is David chorea out the young photographer who shot images from magazines, including the face and the new musical express he showed Richard Hamilton some of his photos as Tim Westwood are very young, Tim Westwood's who's he was actually in Tower blocks Council House block East London somewhere.

  • This was probably a hold location for pirate radio D.J.s, they were always haven't moved from location to location, because they were constantly being hunted down by the bearers broadcasting officials that didn't agree with pirate radio, so the wrist blankets pinned up along the walls to try and baffle the sound curtains are drawn in to try and hide what's actually going on, there would be mobile antennas for the radio stations would be put on top of high places.

  • He was very influential in bringing back a lot of Americans imported records, particularly you started playing the hip.

  • The radio station was London weekend, radio, he was influential, he went to a lot of things, and he must have been a very exciting time.

  • I mean, were they literally on the run from the police.

  • All the time, was that sort of cat and mouse for start of the pirate radio station closed down, pop, very much so, the frequency of radio station would suddenly vanish.

  • You'd be driving, you go down one street, you've got a good signal turning Left, and suddenly that signal have gone, it was very thought about hookers to what was actually going to be happening from day to day, almost, depending on where they were broadcasting.

  • It was an exciting time.

  • And it was the period when clock music was really becoming big as well, there were a lot of nightclubs in London, gave all the T.V., it's a good opportunity to advertise, where they were going to be performing, O.K., shall we look at the next picture.

  • O.K., so we've got two young man, one sort of pulling the heirs of another one, and they're in a room, it's not really a Club, and there's people dancing various mixed races, all having a good time and large speakers.

  • Again, a turntable and a mixing Desk.

  • So who have we got here, we've got Giles Pete's very young looking Charles Peterson and crisp.

  • To do this, that are performing.

  • It's a back room of a pub in London bridge Charles Peterson was d.j.ing for, I think radio in the Victor at that time.

  • So, in fact, he was a pirate radio station.

  • Yes, what happened to it, it just disappeared.

  • Yes, I think that's the thing with her quite a lot of stations.

  • They if they couldn't get broadcasting licence is, I've this carried on illegally for fair periods sucked up to D.J.s realised they could actually get paid go into the more legitimate Peterson, he was playing jazz, so what would be classified As world music, I suppose, unusual music, even by those stance of that time, the Latin American salsa.

  • It was really at the forefront of the acid that built up around this time, it's really have an underground feel, in a way, it wasn't so much playing at flushing nightclubs, but playing in small venues where people can just really enjoy them.

  • That's very chorea with Richard Hamilton, that's all from us for an updated version of the global news podcast will be available to download later, if you'd like to comment on this edition of the stories we included do drop us an email.

  • The address is global podcast at B.B.C. dot co dot U.K., my name's Andrew peach.

  • Thank you for listening and until next time.