Tim Harford Tim Barack Obama Kenya Africa Us Kerry Etienne Aranda America

The Fifth Floor 2017-09-29:13:50.00
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  • Here we go again.

  • Another fifth floor pad cast and David, a man, Aw, thanks for downloading me, it's good to talk to you again.

  • Now, if you're a regular listener, you would have heard from my colleague over who sits just behind me in the great lakes service of the fifth floor and recently another colleague dance all University school mate did becontree man also joined as well.

  • It seemed a good opportunity to hear the story of how they came to be working in the Kenya service, both began and video were children at the time of the genocide and they remember listening to a B.B.C. lifeline programme called cow was that translates roughly as reuniting families, and it was launched in nineteen ninety four, the programme used to read out messages from people trying to find their relatives.

  • Now you sent out Wi me seated handi Community with Kerry.

  • And I said, you shout, and I know where we are.

  • We're now you're Maddie cleared up and up, we can basically I first heard about the P.B. see well, if, if she camped ours.

  • Nineteen ninety four.

  • How old were you at the time, I was Sir, but Etienne solve it for me and him, we are going to the end, I could see year men listening today programme specially for you, you find a lion, holding a radio set and others would be following attentively the Very programme.

  • I work for the secret flakes, the problem you for now that we will call you back.

  • If you know at the time that you were listening to b. seek always the lifeline programme, but I was too young to understand the politics of this subject matter, but I remember that picture of men gathering somewhere in their football peach tree, listening to them.

  • When did you first experience, radio, I experience a radio when I was very young, I think I was a balance between ten and twelve years old, I used to pretend to be a newsreader, and my family members, it laughed at that, and we were to gather over dinner, it would read news I use do you get your eye sometimes are more food more drinks, because I want to say, well, if you don't give me more food.

  • I would not do that.

  • So I would listen to the radio.

  • So, wait a minute.

  • You weren't just making it up, you when you were picking up news that you heard on the radio and repeating it, I want to put some of the twists in the news, the news was was up, which radio station.

  • When you listen to it was the national radio station, he nicking Aranda, but then, when I was around, maybe fourteen fifteen I started listening to the B.B.C. by without knowing exactly what that was about, so you were listening to b. b. c.

  • English before you Were listening to, indeed, I say to myself, I want to work for the B.B.C. one.

  • When I was in high school, there was a B.B.C. reporter who came to our school.

  • I'm doing a story on the main your development course and funny enough, one of the guys that he interviewed was the President of the English Club, and I was his Vice President for ten years later, I was at this time, he'll be b. c. into inika galley Office, guess what.

  • The first story that I did for the b. b. c. was a Commission to follow up on that guy, and he happened to be my best friend was a coincidence or was it, somebody had suggested it was hitched that story, he was a total coincidence.

  • I laughed on the phone, because I knew the guy, so you've got this inspiration from listening to radio in the early days, you above got together at University and started a radio programme in the school of journalism had a radio station, and to be able to work in there, you handed to be analysed in the third year, I was in first gear.

  • So I went to the Director of the radio station.

  • I said, listen every programme is nicking around why country start in English programme.

  • So we start in English programme, and they were looking for volunteers.

  • So myself, and the two other classmates.

  • We started in English programme called Saturday morning reports.

  • So did Year after he joined the school of journalism.

  • We had him on the programme as well, because he was interested, you guys were not bad.

  • Let's hear a clip of that one of your programmes from those days here.

  • Welcome to the Saturday morning reports of third anniversary show, and we or host pre duh think offer end um de dear bickering manor.

  • Three years ago, the first episode of this programme, there were a lot of Lady tonight.

  • There are mornings in the preparations for the sure millions of technical problems.

  • Big on small their way of mystics unexpected successes.

  • I saw today.

  • Take the time to relax.

  • A lot of it.

  • And remember, some of the stories we brought to you on Saturday morning reports, ladies and gentlemen, Saturday morning.

  • Reporter filtering down and saying, you were in listening to that doesn't sound bad to me at all.

  • Well, that's very kind of you.

  • David to say, remember, David, this is something that we were doing alongside study, it's just, we wanted to get into radio and to be professional, radio, don't apologise pre done it sounded pretty good for clever, you're out the intention was to have a live programme, we did he try to do our regional stories from scratch.

  • Princess est repartee thirty nine year old woman who has H.I.V.. past at the stretch like give me a scholarship to go to one of the Raider festivals in America that story pre done talked about Their took him to the States, he end up covering the U.S. election when Barack Obama was elected President and people thought our radio station had sent a report, they had to do was just a coincidence.

  • Nice story nice twist in, and we've got to do most of the interviews, did you get to choose, first and then he'd say you're here, you do this.

  • Come on, I think he's the editor of the programme you can't argue with him.

  • Can you did it.

  • You can't no was it democratic, Oh, it was a democratic procedure authoritarian never we always had he not editorial meetings.

  • So we everything goes decided and approved in the editorial meetings.

  • What about now, when you look back now, where you see the great legs Desk, did you ever imagine.

  • This is where you'd be today, I'd be a mess.

  • I don't think I ever saw this coming, maybe not.

  • Thus, I would say, his parents, going to call him my Desk, couldn't be in selected did, yet, but we have at you.

  • I mean pre done.

  • I mean, I can see that used to punching above your weight, a first year student who took on a third year job.

  • So, for you, maybe wasn't too soon for you to be here.

  • Now, do not let anyone tell you that you can't dress, when I applied for work experience inika go had been its Office April, I was making fun of me as they Are come on, how could you go and b. says, where do I have to lose, I don't what I'd meet it.

  • I can proudly say that I'm leaving the dream, and he put these, if you're a young journalist or are trying to beam two generals modern indeed anything, not just travellers work hard stay focused everything you were get it, and I can't believe that you like, I call you, my colleague, when I used to listen to focus on Africa network Africa as it, how can I send him a text message, so that he can read my text message.

  • You know what I mean.

  • I was still waiting for protects, let's just, you're, I don't know, I know, when I bump into you some of the people who inspired he, I'll b. b. c.

  • I'm horse pub melting.

  • One more thing that is really important to add, there is this age fuck.

  • Don't you find out that you're working with people who would otherwise be your grandfather, for instance, are you looking at me like that he's really, you know, I mean, I come from the country.

  • Well, we respect people where does a mint you feel humbled to be working side by side with people, he'd call your grandfather or your father any hair there from D.D.A. becontree manner, and Peter of b. b. c.

  • Kenya wonder if I've got the news about how you can vote for what's going to be in the final Episode of the B.B.C.'s podcast series fifty things that made the modern economy.

  • Fifty fixed everything.

  • The modern economy with Tim, Hello, I couldn't stick to fifty, I'm going for fifty one.

  • So what thing.

  • Should I be making an extra special podcast the credit card glass, the global positioning system, irrigation, the pencil all to spread.

  • These are all suggestions that came from a podcast listeners, and now you can vote for, which will be the fifty first thing that made the modern economy vote online now at B.B.C. world service dot com slash fifty one things that's five one where you'll also find full terms and conditions.

  • Voting closes at twelve noon, on Friday, the sixth of October twenty seventy that was Tim Harford from the series, fifty things that made the modern economy.

  • Thanks for listening.