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Newshour 2017-09-28:21:00.00
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  • Hello and welcome to news live from the B.B.C. world service in London, I'm Tim Franks, in a moment, we have a special report from a correspondent in Myanmar has the United Nations failed the hinges.

  • Also on the programme, we'll hear from the Venezuelans, leaving the country in search of food.

  • Where's the Motown and does missus tingle missus Veronica is five months pregnant, she travels two hours every day with her mother, Maddy, Lou's to sell fruit at the market, they can't find work back home, and this is their only look at the weight, I've lost says her mother married was, I used to be healthy and strong, but we have to walk such a long way and work.

  • So, from the, Colombia, Venezuela, border him just over thirty minutes a grim landmark was passed today, out of the conflict in Western Myanmar, the number of the Henge Muslims who fled the country into Bangladesh exceeded half a million, and an investigation by the Pepys he's raised serious questions about how the United Nations has handled the Ranger issue will bring you that in just a moment.

  • But first, let's hear from the U.N. Secretary general himself Tony Irish briefing the security Council within the last hour on the unfolding disaster in South East Asia.

  • The situation is spear olds into the world's fastest developing refugee emergency, and they humanitarian and human rights nightmare.

  • I continued to Call on the Myanmar authorities took a city immediate steps, first to end the military operations.

  • Second, to allow an fats with excess what he meditate and supports and Sir to ensure the safe voluntarily, dignified and sustain or return of the refugees to their areas of origin strong words from the U.N. Secretary general, but now interviews and documents leaked to the b. b. c. reveal that during the years running up to the current crisis, the un leadership in Myanmar, tried to prevent its own officials, raising the rer hinges problems with the Burmese government.

  • They also advised human rights advocates, not to travel to sensitive areas, a spokesman for the un denied the claim, saying that they'd always prioritised human rights in a few minutes will ask a former senior U.N. hand, whether there's a deeper problem within the United Nations, in these difficult situations.

  • First has promised our former Myanmar correspondent Jonah Fisher has this report in the months since Rick injure Muslims first began fleeing into Bangladesh.

  • The United Nations has been at the forefront of the response.

  • Delivering aid and making robust statements condemning the Burmese authorities situation remains the text, but a textbook example of ethnic cleansing, but could and should the un have done more before the killing and burning started really disturbing.

  • I think that's a marvellous cook possibly have been prevented watching the horrors from afar, is Caroline than dinner, a Belgian lawyer and aid worker between twenty thirteen and Twenty fifteen, she ran the Office of the top United Nations official in Myanmar.

  • Her name is Renata dysart Liam, she's a comedian.

  • It was a stressful time tensions were high and reclaimed state where aid agencies were accused of taking the side of the ring.

  • It's going to be less says her boss became so afraid of upsetting the Burmese authorities that any suggestion that the U.N. should stand up and speak out for the hinges human rights became off limits, even in internal meetings.

  • Well, you could do it, but it had consequences, and it had negative consequences.

  • It had consequences that you were maybe no longer invited to meetings or it had consequences that your travel authorisation to or not. atmosphere was created that talking about these issues were simply was simply not is found in a dealer who worked in Rwanda before the genocide there says she repeatedly warned her boss, about the possibility of ethnic cleansing, but she says she was labelled an alarmist and a troublemaker, and frozen out of her job.

  • Do I know at the rear did in very simple terms, because it was referring to keep its good relations with the government over protecting hard to reality.

  • It's a very sad theology, but I think it is the only reality.

  • Her comments have been confirmed off the record by other senior U.N. staff, he's going through a profound Princes duck threepence Thomas can Tana is more used to speaking out for Six years, he was the un special reporter for human rights in Myanmar.

  • He told me via Skype from Argentina, but my son, Ian had also tried to stop him raising sensitive were hinge it issues with the government, I was shit is buys from harassing you should not the rusty, please don't, so that's why it was not like that trench not sure, bring try with your dentistry, the un is aware that it does have a problem, a report that it commissioned two years ago, and that was leaked to the b. b. c. says the un focused too heavily on the oversimplified hope that development investment itself will reduce tensions, a memo prepared earlier this year for the new Secretary general called the un in Myanmar glaringly dysfunctional after those damaging assessments, the un announced in June that my son Ian would leave her job, but Emma seems to quite like and has blocked her replacement, so she's still in place.

  • This is, Shway man, the former speaker of the Burmese Parliament go that your misery.

  • She's fed and not biased.

  • So, whoever is biased towards to a hinge, or might like her Miz Desailly, and declined to be interviewed for this piece, but in a statement her Office, said, we strongly disagree with the accusations that the resident coordinator prevented internal discussions and stressed, but she had the backing of the United Nations Secretary general in the last month, half a million really injure the fled Into Bangladesh their tales of atrocities and abuse serve as a reminder to Caroline found in a dealer of the warnings that went and heard are hard to say which action.

  • Wouldn't have been able to prevent this.

  • I don't know for sure it was that the way it was done, was never going to, I know the way it was done simply was can or English disowned by the Burmese unwanted in Bangladesh.

  • Is there anyone who hasn't met down there, Richard, a former Myanmar correspondent during a fissure.

  • So how far did the issues, he was raising point to a wider institutional maybe cultural problem with the United Nations Edward Mortimer was Chief speechwriter and adviser to the former U.N. Secretary general, Kofi Annan, and he's now an academic at Oxford University.

  • What is generally true is that, very often, the people who are in working in the capital of a country and trying desperately to maintain a working relationship with the government, in the hope, among other things, of getting better humanitarian access to the victims.

  • In a situation like this, do sometimes try and avoid and discourage very outspoken public statements, which they fear may only make the situation worse.

  • There was a very clear case of this in Sri Lanka in two thousand and nine well, although they're some of the humanitarian people on the ground were giving estimates of casualties, but their superiors in new York where refusing to endorse these, and it appeared That that was largely because they didn't want to further antagonise the Sri Lanka government, which was actually responsible for the situation that there was a big sort of scandal about that an investigation and a very critical report, after which the previous Secretary general ban Ki moon introduced a new programme called human rights up front, which was supposed to remind everybody working for the U.N. that they had to pay attention to human rights, and not just to good relations with governments, but of course, it's always easier to make that point.

  • So we're in cold blood.

  • He said to speak to apply it in the midst of a very fast moving and unpleasant situation, which is clearly what we are seeing now in Myanmar.

  • And that's the key thing is that I can understand what you're saying about how agencies that are working in the country might think to themselves, United Nations might seem to itself, or we can have more effect, if we just carry on, in a sense, behind the scenes, and that we maintain decent relations with the government.

  • And yet there are examples time again, where perhaps the un just waited a bit long before it did call governments out.

  • I think that undoubtedly, there have been such cases, of course, is not only a matter of words also of action.

  • Sometimes I think he's a case that comes very much to mind, and, of course, one meets forever, but we're not Talking only about the Secretariat here, but also about the security Council and a Member States.

  • In the case of Rwanda, had troops on the ground, but they withdrew them, rather than reinforcing them when the genocide started.

  • Obviously, the situation in their ma is not quite comparable to that, because there aren't any U.N. troops on the scene to send any would require a resolution of the security Council, and I don't think at the moment.

  • Anybody thinks that that would be a helpful way to deal with the situation.

  • But obviously the maximum of pressure does need to be put on the Burmese authorities to allow humanitarian workers in and to try and create a situation where the people who fled across the border into Bangladesh would actually want to come back, because it, you know, while this current mayhem is going on, they obviously, I'm not going to want to do.

  • The trouble is that one suspects.

  • In fact, one pretty much use, but that's precisely the object of the campaign that the military are carrying out, I guess.

  • One of the problems that many will point to, there is that, look at what's happening in a kind.

  • Look at what happened in Darfur.

  • Look at what happened in former Yugoslavia.

  • Look at Sri Lanka, the un ends up intervening strongly, either through action or through words, but after, in some cases, years in which this violence.

  • All these depredations have been going on, and that the Criticism is that somehow the un is just too slow to make a stronger intervention earlier.

  • Well, I mean, I think there's a tendency to talk about the U.N. as though it was a single independent actor, which could just intervene anywhere and change things, because it felt like it.

  • The U.N. is, in fact, as you know, an Association of, I think it's now one hundred and ninety two Member States and, if you want to take forceful action.

  • Only the security Council can do that, and there you have to line up the five permanent members, because each one of them has a veto to do almost anything effective, you have to have a degree of consensus within the international Community, the people working for the U.N. Secretary general downwards, are all bound to work to try and achieve that, and it's not something that they can do overnight, just by snapping their fingers.

  • I think that strong, clear statements by the Secretary general by the high, Commissioner for human rights and other senior officials certainly do have a role to play.

  • And you can always argue about exactly when is the right moment for that, at what level, how strong their statements should be, but I think that they don't buy themselves change their situation, they are one element in a very complicated and often fast moving diplomatic and military context, and I think you have to see the un..

  • Like that, and so does the U.N. Is too slow.

  • I mean, that's a bit like saying, well, humanity is too slow.

  • I was the former U.N. official Edward Mortimer, you're listening to news from the B.B.C. coming up on the programme as Europe's largest airline Ryanair continues to cancel flights after messing up its pilot Rosa just how much disruption.

  • A passenger's willing to take from a low cost carrier last week, it said, these are the only cancellations.

  • We're going to make this week, it says, we're making more cancellations and actually, you can ignore what we said last week, the public don't forgive that sort of message, and that's when the reputation of damage, isn't just about the brand damage, it's also about profitability being hurt more on that in just over ten minutes.

  • Our headlines is, as we've been hearing the U.N. Secretary general Antonia grittier Irish has told the U.N. security Council that violence in Myanmar has created the world's most rapidly developing refugee emergency and a new audio tape purporting to be from the leader of Islamic state at the back, I'll duck daddy has been posted online.

  • The first for nearly a year, you're listening to the B.B.C. world service and lime from London, this is news with me.

  • Tim Franks, one of the, perhaps more surprising aspects to going to a gym in Beirut, it was certainly surprised to me last time I was there, it is, how many people palpably have had quite extensive cos medic surgery.

  • Perhaps It shouldn't have been a surprise, given the statistic.

  • I'm now going to repeat to you that one in three Lebanese women have had some sort of cosmetic enhancement and now apparently men are catching up.

  • It's thought that more than one in three cosmetic procedures have been carried out on men, indeed, twice as many men in the Middle East generally having plastic surgery in comparison with the rest of the world, according to the latest statistics surgeon say that they're seeing a wider trend in the Middle East, where men are looking to get rid of what they see as their ethnically Arab profile Livia le point of our reports of blood being pumped down a tube into in the passive plastic surgery.

  • Remember in Beirut swear patient Paul is undergoing surgery on his nose, the lamb is the surgeon, yes, have a today, it's Monday, so we are starting the week with the surgery, and we have a bowling is having this row.

  • She has a problem with his nose so without I to fix that.

  • The red poppy, let's go, as well as now just started making decisions into pools the scalpel up to pools are left nostril Stevie a week, two or three per day.

  • So half of the patients.

  • I remember a little bit less than have, why is the rate of nose jobs in the Middle East, particularly Lebanon, so high in comparison with the rest of the world.

  • I think the men, You've no other animals have ever up of for my clumps mark can orthogonal Newquay Asian people have that and all they really need to this, like people, the flats also Felicity, and I would have company with their noses so they like he was a bit out of noise, Prof. when people don't like that.

  • So we're nearly at the end of the operation.

  • He said you were in for an hour and ten minutes and Ella's, this is checking that there's no extra bleeding there, everything's as we can.

  • I'm here in downtown debris and played just looking at all the billboards of young athletic men, there's no doubt that looking good plastic surgeons.

  • I've been speaking to tell me that male patients, as young as sixteen come today asking for surgery.

  • Most up under, why do young men similar healthy.

  • She is the fashion editor of the newspaper, I shout a lot beauty, a mean in the ad world in general, in live, it's like going to a dentist every six months for surgery are doing Botox doing nip and tuck is quite normal.

  • It is thanks to social media that a lot of it's plastic surgery have become really arrive.

  • Now, specially in the Middle East, because everybody to look good.

  • We face work with such a media as an Instagram wherever he selfies now, some people go to actually some plastic surgeons and the ask, I wanted a good on my Instagram surely your Noses your kind of signify of ethnic identity.

  • Indeed, but when you're young, you feel you have to, because everybody has got, and you're the only one with the big one.

  • It seems of social media, continuing to grow and influence the way young people look, we'll see many more men having that Tux and nose jobs here in the Middle so it's a living live quite a van reporting from Beirut, a three year old girl from the Paul has been formally enthroned as a living goddess trishna shack recognised as the new Kumari of Katmandu was anointed by Hindu priests in a short initiation ceremony in the Nepalese capital afterwards, when wearing a rich red dress, she was carried by a father, you'll find out what that significant just a moment to the Kumari is Palace, where she'll live separated from her family and only allowed to leave the temple on special occasions, until she reaches puberty and the role passes to another young girl so hard sand is a journalist who's made a documentary about the practice, she told me how the girls are selected, they have certain characteristics that they look, for they have to look very beautiful, then they look for good skin good teeth.

  • They shouldn't have any scars or scratches.

  • That's where they can't walk, or do anything because they shouldn't get any scratches, they can't walk, no, no, they're not allowed to walk only a very small amount in the House, and It has to be cleaned, and then they put a tick on their head, and they select like three, they take them to the temple and wife of the priest inspects their body naked, and then they do some ritual.

  • Apparently, these girls goatee trance, they give them some stuff to drink, and then they say this one, let's talk about the life of the girls been selected what awaits them in this Palace there Kumari or the goddess in Kathmandu, is considered to be the main one.

  • She's the one that the King goes to, she's there, the biggest, the most Holly, one that one is taken to the Palace, the other ones.

  • Sometimes stay with their families, the Kathmandu.

  • One, it's usually not that lucky, because they actually get separated from their families and they are brought up by caretakers in the House, and they have to go through all of these rituals, every day, with these caretakers and their parents have to come and visit them once or twice a week, but not as their parents, but as people who worship them, and they have to come on to them, but the ones in petit point, and the other one, are actually a lot more relaxed, they do live with their families, and their pet families on a couple of caretakers look after their Affairs, they have to wake them up.

  • Dress them up every day.

  • They have to wash the whole House with milk.

  • They have To feed them in a certain way, they're not allowed to really walk, they're not allowed to get any scratches, because these girls are believed to be goddesses, because they're possessed by the most powerful deity and they say that if these girls get any scratches the data will come up these people work really hard to make sure that these girls are safe.

  • How do these girls now women, that you spoke to, how do they emerge from this, you really saw this duality with these girls, there was this thing with the identity that I really struggled to unveil, on one hand, they were given this role as a child, before they even knew how to talk, how to walk there was told you're a goddess you sit there you are better than everyone and people praised you, you're better then your siblings were better than your parents, you don't even talk to them.

  • By the way, these girls are not allowed to talk to anyone, but they're caretakers, and once they get their period.

  • Suddenly, they're like, Oh, Kay, bye bye, you still have respect as ex call Murray, but then go to school.

  • Good luck.

  • One of them.

  • I was talking to, I'm getting goosebumps remembering she was telling me about the day she got her period, and she had to step outside of a House for the first time, because these girls very rarely leave their Palace, and they get carried around the streets, and That's only just to go to the temple, and come back, she was telling me how they had to walk barefoot outside, and she said, I felt like the roads were melting and my legs were weak and the heat off the street was scaring me or any of them resent having fulfilled this role.

  • Having had no say about whether they were going to fulfil this role, it seemed to me that they were worried that if they admit to me or themselves, they tried that was taken away from them, and that this was a hard time for them, that they did it all for nothing that they sacrificed all of that for nothing, and that they would let their families, their Court heard of society down because Nepalese really take pride in this tradition, it's been going on for centuries.

  • There is something else.

  • I want to mention as well.

  • Here, this is not all negative, a lot of them were saying, this is a country where women in the villages are really discriminated against and that society, a girl is given this privilege to be worshipped gobsmacking story brought to life by the documentary maker, Sohar, xand took him out there living goddesses of Nepal on now news about what's going to be in the final episode of our B.B.C. world service podcast series fifty things that made the modern economy, and how you can influence it, he's Tim Harford fifty think stepping into the modern Economy with Tim, Hello, I couldn't stick to fifty, I'm going for fifty one.

  • So what thing.

  • Should I be making an extra special podcast the credit card glass, the global positioning system, irrigation, the pencil all the spreadsheet.

  • These are all suggestions that came from a podcast listeners, and now you can vote for, which will be the fifty first thing that made the modern economy, vote online now at B.B.C. world service dot com slash fifty one things that's five one where you'll also find full terms and conditions.

  • Voting closes at twelve noon, on Friday, the sixth of October twenty seventy next on newsround what one very seasoned Asia specialist did when North Korea came knocking first business news and the budget airline Ryanair might like to boast to use the cliche that it's cheap and cheerful these days.

  • Hundreds of thousands of passengers, along with Britain's civil aviation authority might have issues with the adjective, cheerful lines, just announced its cancelling a further eighteen thousand flights and suspending dozens of roots entirely, I think, to many others already cancelled over the past two weeks, Charles is the former Director of communications for Virgin Atlantic, he now runs a consultancy for the travel industry.

  • Ryanair's in trouble for not telling the one hundred per cent truth to its consumers.

  • So it hasn't been telling consumers exactly what their rights are what refunds are eligible, and it simply been putting its own rules down rather than those Of the aviation industry, which it signed up to when it started the airline in the first place, and why has it been cancelling all these flights at such short notice.

  • Essentially, it's down to two things, one of its own making.

  • The first is that the rules have changed in the Irish aviation industry, relating to pilots and hours, they can work, and the second is that their own management team allegedly just didn't prepare for this day knew it was coming, it knew the rules, we're going to change, and it didn't take the appropriate measures to make sure that its pilots would be eligible for the time off, they needed, and yet still fulfil the ambitious growth criteria that Ryanair has an airline anybody whose books Ryanair will know that it comes with the idea that you getting at a cheap price, because it's no frills, how far can that be stretched until it reaches breaking point, there is the old adage, you get what you pay for, of course, but there are rules in the industry.

  • The reason that Ryanair's given an operating licence is because it has to stick to those rules, Rhianna's problem is that it hasn't been upfront, and when you're not up front, the crisis will grow and grow and grow and a crisis is led by the person at the top and Michael o'Leary is one of the most accomplished sios and business people in the airline industry.

  • But he's no, You've not necessarily sticking to the rules.

  • In this particular case, it might yet come home to grab him, it's one thing for the regulators to say you're not sticking adequately to the rules.

  • It's another thing for there to be reputation or damage, and for people to think we're just not going to take the risk of booking with this airline at what point do you think that begins to kick in, you get reputation or damage in a crisis, when you're not up front early enough.

  • Last week, it said, these are the only cancellations.

  • We're going to make between now and the end of the year.

  • This week, it says, we're making more cancellations and actually, you can ignore what we said last week, the public don't forgive that sort of message, they did not forgive when you do a u. turn on your own apology.

  • So as a result, the trust the goodwill that's built up in her brand starts to deteriorate, and if you have a choice today.

  • As to whether to book a flight.

  • Right now, for your next holiday, the chances are, you're probably not going to put at the top of your list, simply because you can't be certain, they're not gonnae you turn again and cancel thousands more flights, and that's when the reputation of damage, isn't just about the brand damage, it's also about profitability being hurt the travel industry consultant Paul Charles on the travails of Ryan listening to News from the b. b. c. in London with me.

  • Tim Franks, we spent a lot of time in recent weeks, months, inhaling the increasingly sulphuric rhetoric between Washington and Pyongyang or specifically between Donald trump and Kim Jong ern it now appears that our fascination is shared in the North Korean capital itself, at least according to a report in the Washington post newspaper headline North Korea taps a geo p. another was the U.S. Republican party analysts to better understand trump and his messages.

  • The white be saw story claims that North Korean government officials have been quietly trying to arrange talks with specialist linked to the governing party, and what the paper says he's an apparent attempt to make sense of President trumpet.

  • It's confusing messages to the Kim Jong un regime.

  • Among those approached was Douglas Paul and Asia expert on the national security Council and Presidents Reagan and Bush and our senior figure at the Carnegie endowment for international peace.

  • I haven't been describing who approach bits have to say it's an intermediary of authority of lakes back to North Korea, but it was this year, in January, shortly after crump selection and with whom having weeded some disrespectful things about South Korea and saying, some things about possibly talking to North Korea, I think they were looking around to see what the soul might mean for them, as the risen an opportunity there, and we talked about travelling to pee on the media will Some significant figures in the regime, but aunt was that there might be a way to open talks, we could find a basis for such tasks.

  • It sounds absolutely fascinating, but you turned this offer down, while the first off road and turned ours would fall apart, because of the technical difficulties of getting there.

  • They does have a really will some other NGOs, canals and elsewhere, with the same personalities on the North Korean side, that I would have seen, we're not very forthcoming and soul, the came around again in the usual spring cycle.

  • After the major military exercises in South Korea.

  • There's really have short term peace offence of the last until the next round of military exercises they came looking again and may, to see if a media could be put together with the terms, didn't seem to be getting any better for doing that.

  • And now they've come back and August, which was after the most recent cycle of watery exercises, again, almost like seasonal changes, they keep coming back to talk, where the exercises are over, and there's going to be a pa's gosh, they really want to speak to you what, what is it.

  • Do you think they're after, I think that they're trying to create the impression now only worth his approaches, but also with, there are frequent muscle, and you're clear to us that they now have an upper hand her a significant or getting though more respectful hearing from United States, in particular, do you think also that asking, as this piece in the Washington post suggested they're asking for your help in deciphering President trumps motives.

  • He's thinking, his strategy was can my particular case, I did not have that approach may put a couple of the other people who have been approached did have housekeeping apart, trumpet, what it might mean for them.

  • In my case, they were talking much higher terms of peace and security.

  • A wrap.

  • That's so much personalities.

  • If the logistics could be sorted out, do you think that would be a role that you'd be interested in taking that you think would be worthwhile.

  • I'm not so far.

  • Well, what if I had a very recent approach from them again.

  • High and the trams, don't get any better.

  • It's hard to imagine why I would want to spent fourteen fifteen hours on an aeroplane to go over here kiln plonk young or Oslo, or some other place precisely what I cos you're in my Office from the same people, the North has a direct channelled to the United States authorities through there are new York Embassy had three Nations, and if they really have something to say, they'll say at, they're at it, the looking for cheerleaders for people to put pressure on the administration to start to talk now I imagine the North thinks it's approaching a moment where it's loveridge has strong have you think out of States feels that they Were just not quite strong enough yet on their side.

  • They want to see the recently strengthen sanctions kicking in and bite from North Korea, I'm not trying to get you to agree to the North Koreans approach shore enquiry for their sake, or for your sake, but I just wonder whether I mean, firstly, whether it just might not be academically interesting, but secondly, impress.

  • More importantly, I mean, you're a seasoned very senior former official in government to know that sometimes back channel diplomacy can bear fruit, at least, is perhaps worth exploring.

  • When the stakes are potentially so high absolutely have I completely agree with the proposition, which is why I've had their meetings, but so far they haven't brought me enough to say, this is going to be a back channel worth exploring.

  • Of course, I've kept my old government wait asked the state Department officials and form with all these steps that we have in the world have been talking with each other, all of us have come to the conclusion, there's not much, there are free yet, but will keep attending his occasional Reza as one and burn last week with the same people from North Korea and, once again, the participants came back, saying that it was really nothing to talk about, can I ask you, then, for your opinion as an expert on the region.

  • For your opinion of this current very heated rhetoric, between the President and between the Supreme leader In, well, this is not to use a mild double married tournaments unhelpful.

  • It's called a productive and possibly risky.

  • And so I think it's just the wrong way to go.

  • Another reason why I had to talk with my friends to talk to the North Koreans when they offer themselves up, because we do think this has to be kept on, and more civil and measured a basis of expression.

  • There appears to be a school of thought, or it certainly a school of concern in the States that perhaps the point for diplomacy has been passed, but this is not a regime with which one can do business.

  • And, frankly, they've developed their ballistic and their nuclear technology to a point where the red line has been crossed, what's your opinion of that, that there's a very reasonable and perhaps correct hypothesis, we don't quite know the answer to it, it's going to take on more time loves revision to see whether this is in fact the case.

  • But North Korea husband pursuing this kind of military solution towards security problem for fifty years, doesn't clock will be diverted from is almost within grasp that they can demonstrate the ability to launch a nuclear weapon.

  • There can successfully reached the United States, for whatever purpose, and so I don't think they're going to be deterred from that, and if we sat down to talk adult, we can talk them out of their weapons, even though we might never Agree to give up our pursuit of the weapons free Korean peninsula.

  • Nonetheless, with how we have to deal with something that falls short of, and in that regard, doesn't growing recognition at certain my belief that we're going to have to rely armed containment and deterrence and saw a lot more work needs to be done to demonstrate to the containment and deterrent strategist can bid successfully deployed Douglas Paul former Member of the Reagan and Bush national security councils.

  • Now, Vice President of the Washington, D.C based think tank, the Carnegie endowment for international peace.

  • Venezuela has long suffered food shortages and hyper inflation and the situation appears only to be getting worse.

  • For many, the only option is to find help in neighbouring countries like Colombia, official figures put the number of Venezuelans living in Columbia at three hundred thousand, but the real number is thought to be much higher.

  • South America correspondent Katie Watson reports from the Colombian border town of cook at as dawn breaks the rumble of suitcases is a familiar sound on the seam on believer international bridge linking Venezuela and Colombia.

  • Many of the cases are empty Venezuelans coming over to fill their bags with food to medicines.

  • They can't get back home.

  • Some twenty five thousand Venezuelans come across the bridge, every day, it's a short walk between the two countries, but they're worlds, two women with a baby in a pushchair just walked through the border control and said to Me what a humiliation to see having to buy baby goods, I could see there were you buying nappies things they can't get in Venezuela, I would buy the crisis in Venezuela's taking its toll on everyone on the bridge.

  • There are plenty of mothers crossing to get their babies vaccinated as well as families pushing relatives in wheelchairs heading to the nearest hospital.

  • Some, though, are leaving for good mum seomar is saying goodbye to her son, Louise and his girlfriend Astrid, they're on their way to Chile, I have no choice.

  • There's Astrid, it's the only way to have a future.

  • There are mixed emotions as the family goes their separate ways, but they also feel the crisis is so bad.

  • In Venezuela, that many people skip meals, because they can't afford to eat three quarters the Venezuelans have lost weight in the past year, an average of nine kilos.

  • The local Church.

  • Nearby is trying to help out, feeding between six hundred and two thousand people a day as the people come through her picking up plates on the long table full of food in the cooks stanich behind table, each with a massive, that's amber spoonful of rice, a ladle of beans of meat and a potato.

  • We're going down does missus tingle missus Veronica is five months pregnant, she travels two hours every day with her mother, Maddy, Lou's to sell fruit at the market, they can't find work back home, and this is their Only look at the weight, I've lost says her mother married was, I used to be healthy and strong, but we have to walk such a long way and work.

  • So, while most of the Venezuelans crossing into Columbia come for the day.

  • An increasing number of choosing to stay and authorities are feeling the pressure. am here at this area has been here for eighteen months, and helps organise the Foundation of Venezuelans Inkle they are times of stub Louise London Lopez is the Secretary victims peas and post conflict for the region have not have been there somethin there fill us with their remember me kiss enough Peter look out there.

  • Look at hospital had been told.

  • He has to attend to Venezuela's were free, so Colombians complained that the service is very bad for us.

  • They help that arrive is for not Colombians.

  • There is a lot of the stigma.

  • This crisis could get more complicated.

  • In the future, because, first of all, with the Nong when the real way for been a swill on Communist, they will be at the moment, there is a pretty big flow, but not everybody's stays some go back, they buy what they can retire on, but what's going to have been win, they can't go back any more, because the Madeira redeem gloves, a border or be caused the armed groups to control the border Wunderlich people go back.

  • No, we can, we're going to Venezuelans arrive with great expectations Of a new life, but their savings.

  • Here are worthless.

  • So many get stuck.

  • Unable to move forward, but determined not to go back, it was Casey, what's a reporting from the Colombian Venezuelan border, just to say, if you want to listen again to some of the greatest hits, as it were, head to the B.B.C. news clips page on the website.

  • We've posted to most recently that fascinating interview with the documentary maker, who was looking at the girls have become the Nepalese goddesses baby see.

  • Musak clips our top story, this hour, the unsexy general Antonia good here.

  • If she's told the U.N. security Council had violence and Myanmar has created the world's most rapidly developing refugee emergency earlier on the programme and speaking exclusively to the b. b. c. one former U.N. official questioned whether enough had been done early enough to protect the Ranger do an act at the rear did in very simple terms, because it was referring to keep its good relations with the government over protecting hard to reality.

  • It's a very sad theology, but I think it is the only reality.

  • One of us headline story to bring you a new audio tape purporting to be from the leader of Islamic state.

  • Apple back, I'll the daddy has been posted online.

  • The thirst for nearly a year, you listen to news from the B.B.C. hurricane Irma blew itself out more than a week ago, but the gales of criticism or growing Against the trump administration for its response to the devastation wrought on the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico increasingly desperate, residents say they are still without electricity, clean water.

  • Another basic necessities.

  • Despite assurances from officials in Washington that the relief effort is proceeding very well Casey carroty is running the aid Agency, save the children's operation on the island wants her assessment, I'm certainly in ten one in the capital of pottery where we're looking at how to, I need three point five million people, including seven hundred thousand sold to a with a Turkey in the entire island with a weight, they are looking at dethick communication still areas that haven't been heard ready. don't know if everyone's O.K.. don't knock it, you don't need, ed.

  • Nearly all of the country and back power, without water juggling with the other weeding ours in mine, to get the we go at it quite a dire situation here do go.

  • Why is it proving so difficult to get a lead to people.

  • I don't think we'd be a bit the power, the skill and help of death, the cuddle, he's an entire Eilidh.

  • A back, dead, it back in, I think, when you start to look at.

  • If I had to come into the poetry airport when I, but I derived, they need to be moved junk Chuck's first airport, you might need to be opened and a chat that we need truck driver, the cab are unable to Come to work if they don't have their best, the way of the crumble can deliver.

  • There have been reports that some aid is just piled up at the port in San Juan and that hasn't been moved.

  • Is that still down to things like what you're saying about the dearth of truck drivers.

  • Is it also a failure of organisation in other ways.

  • I'm going down here, as you said, if you know they're arriving in there, they're not able to mill go due to the competition, but I mentioned communicating with truck drivers lacquered Pew, Ah, but here underground up our partners, local government, he man and your partner, but the competition that registered here, I really can do it, I was are putting our back, I can eat my primary and our thumbs the pipe, you're not only, but we do desperately need more, we need to reach at that one hundred thousand, so they had a acquit are you getting adequate logistical support from the U.S. federal authorities, they have put in a massive here.

  • It is now many Department of the government.

  • We are seeing a lot of that, or I'll be in a big effort from my local partners, I think the government here are vocally as well, and your partner's not on the list.

  • I'll get them in as well, members felt that putting in a big effort and a bit of fun.

  • How desperate are people do you get a sense that Patients and stab.

  • No, he's wearing thin.

  • Yesterday, I was visiting some of the shelters that infinity ha people that have water.

  • They don't have air conditioning, they don't have pure Dren generator.

  • If they're lucky enough to have a generator that one gentleman who bet you'd waited two hours about bread.

  • I spoke to a woman who is the single mother with, she's not sure, then back to work.

  • He kicked her out because she doesn't have anyone to care for her children with buses, the way the situation is absolutely getting more desperate why we need if they'll be of the defect, but without getting papayas, and are quickly began to reach it.

  • So he says something that you would like to happen.

  • Now, in order to get a aid out more quickly to people, what would it be.

  • What we really need is more my Saturday, we have to be correct.

  • If you're liver opening the quite quickly.

  • For that.

  • What we really thought we found at making sure that you get, it's all we had quickly past, but if I do, I definitely don't, whatever that Casey Harrer teeth from save the children in Puerto Rico instability in Iraq seems to have no end.

  • The fight against the jihadists of Islamic state may have made huge steps, but there's growing tension between Baghdad and the region.

  • That is home to more than five million Iraqi Kurds on Wednesday, the Kurdish regional government announced that ninety two Percent of voters backed its call for independence in this week's advisory referendum, which was vehemently opposed by the Iraqi government and many outside powers who fear for the unity of the country, a Middle East correspondent Tom Bateman report some air Beale the Kurdish regional capital in northern Iraq.

  • It's on the outskirts of the city of Beale lives as kids year she turns the pages of the family photo album with an index finger stained purple the die was cast on the hand of every voter in this week's Kurdish referendum, O.K.. the speeches because my father was a, this is your father, O.K., here, he's in the snow, and they'd say, Hey, a family was buffeted in the turbulent history of northern Iraq's Kurds.

  • She spent much of Saddam Hussein's rule as a refugee in neighbouring Iran and recalls the arrival there of children among those targeted him his regime's deadly gas attack on the city of her lab ger in hospital.

  • There was all injured just the babies from one month to nine months, and then I sow these babies, without any information they can't know their parents.

  • It was a tragedy.

  • What made you decide to come quit innovation, not in nineteen ninety there are prize sink in all of the Iraq North lies on sold.

  • Because of this, we can return and jet Casa bollo remembers all this history, he opened his music shopping in the nineteen fifties, when a generation here could recall An Imperial carve up of the region, the left.

  • Thirty million Kurds as minorities in four separate countries, but the docks and it does, that's it.

  • He was a simpler place.

  • Back then, he tells me, but later it filled, he recalls her Saddam hit the villages and car Governor nearly fifteen years on from the U.S. led invasion, the relationship between Baghdad and the curds is under severe strain with territory oil revenues and budget payouts all in dispute.

  • The West frets all this distracts from the fight against so called Islamic state, but the Kurdish regions.

  • Foreign Minister fella Mister Arthur back here told me stated was now inevitable.

  • We're tied, they were best to find a few telling.

  • Unfortunately, he did Bob word.

  • Therefore, we want a future afford the source of legitimacy with the people.

  • Of course, who gave a strong mandate and legitimate mandeep they the leadership to rot and negotiate independence celebrations continue for Iraqi Kurds, it is not only aspirations, their political leaders have raised, but also the steaks with Baghdad.

  • We didn't have any think in the past, but now very confident and optimistic, and I know we win, we will be free.

  • I see our country, independent country will be established that this Nascar dear ending that report from Middle East correspondent Tom Bateman in northern Iraq, and it brings this edition of news out her clothes from all of us here for meat and Frank's in the rest of the Team goodbye has been a download from the B.B.C. to discover more and our terms of use with it, b. b. c. dot com slash podcast.