Hugh Hefner Tom Bateman Professor Robin Lovell Kj Matthews Danny Cox Tim Harford Sebastian Asher Saddam Hussein Saddam Martin Luther King Marilyn Monroe Jesse Jackson Hindus Hefner Fraser Stewart David Warner Conrad Christian Celia Hatton Celia Buddhists Asher Iraq Baghdad Kurdistan Japan Bangladesh Asia Wingfield Vanga Uk Tokyo Singh Rupert Netherlands London Angeles Us Texan Sirius Pierre North Korea Modi Middle East Kew Iran Hughes Hayes Harris Gilman Gandhi Erbil City Of Beale China Australia America Abi

Global News Podcast 2017-09-28:15:28.00
Full Text | View extractive summary

  • This is the B.B.C. for details of a complete range of programmes go to B.B.C. world service dot com forward slash, Welcome to the latest global me was recorded at thirteen hours, on Thursday, the twenty eighth of September, I'm Danny Cox with a selection of highlights from across B.B.C. world service news today coming up me anmah has cancelled a long awaited visit by foreign diplomats Dirac Ragtime state from where hundreds of thousands of revenge or Muslims have fled after an army offensive will get the latest from Asia Pacific editor, we now understand that those diplomats were actually sitting on an aeroplane waiting to take off to travel to northern rock kind state and the plane just simply didn't take off.

  • Also in the podcast, the head of the international airport in Iraqi Kurdistan says all foreign flights, there will be suspended from Friday after Baghdad ordered an air blockade of the region.

  • Japan's Parliament has been dissolved.

  • As the country prepares for a snap election, and later, I know that I'm living out despite objection from saw the quarters, a great many people's fantasies, and they are a list of places, and they're paying to see from childhood, I'm of thy whenever we lost touch with the ball, the founder of Playboy magazine.

  • Hugh Hefner has died.

  • But first, the government of me anmah has cancelled are visited by foreign diplomats to Ragtime state, which Has seen an exodus of hundreds of thousands of revenge or Muslims, an official from the un says the diplomats boarded a plane, but it didn't take off because of bad weather, the trip had been organised by the Burmese authorities from officials have been pushing to visit Dragon state to investigate the circumstances behind the exodus of revenge Muslims there began a month ago, tens of thousands of Muslims, as well as Buddhists and Hindus are living in temporary shelters since the military began an operation against Ranger militants.

  • More than four hundred thousand have fled to neighbouring Bangladesh, the Chief emergency doctor for the international organisation for migration in me and doctor, Patrick diagram told the b. b. c. that numerous revenge or women who fled to camps in Bangladesh have said they've suffered rape and sexual assault, they have been multiple ripple odds of six to engender nice violence, whether it has been for rape or sexual assault.

  • Other types of domestic abuse, as well, that has been reported has been reported.

  • Of the people who were here before, as well as the new arrivals and our main priority, ensuring to begin a life saving kit that they need to address those medical ones, like a social needs and ensure that they're being protected, that whilst they, I suppose, to a Asia Pacific editor Celia and asked her for more details of the visit by the foreign diplomats.

  • This is a really interesting visit this with, put On by the Burmese government after a lot of pressure by senior diplomats, including those from the U.N., we now understand that those diplomats were actually sitting on an aeroplane with one seat reserved for U.N. senior official, they were sitting on the airplane waiting to take off to travel to northern rock kind state to see for themselves what's going on on the ground and the plane just simply didn't take off, and they all were told x. at the plane at, there has been a lot of lead up to this trip.

  • We know that they've been pushing for this for a long time, the Burmese government has been resisting allowing a diplomat in tuned to northern Iraq.

  • I resisted allowing media organisations any aid agencies.

  • And what's the latest on the situation in Iraq.

  • Answer, it is the exodus continues the exodus is continuing, where we're hearing some really disturbing figures from rights groups who say now that they believe, judging by satellite imagery, half of row hinge or a Muslim villagers have been torched or understanding us, there's evidence for today from the international organisation for migration of mass rape and sexual assault from those who have fled to premier they Bangladesh.

  • And we're also hearing really disturbing first person account of remaining families, their families who were still in rack ein state, they're not there, presumably because they're there, they're happy with the situation we're understanding that the ones who were left.

  • Some of them Are people who are simply too weak.

  • They include the elderly people with very small children.

  • They don't feel that they have the the the the ability, or even the boats to make the journey.

  • And these are people were hearing accounts of them, leaving their villages in the daytime, to escape the military going into forests and subsisting on leaves and things really to stay away from for military forces and then going back at night time when they think it might be, say, so there's a bit of a cat and mouse game going on with those we understand some of the people who were still in rat kind state Celia Hatton a Burmese government spokesman has told the diplomats, including the un..

  • The visitor will take place next week, the airport's Chief in a all the regional capital of Iraqi Kurdistan says that all international flights are to be suspended from Friday evening, the Iraqi central government in Baghdad, as called front air blockade on Curtis down in response to the positive vote for independence and a referendum held there.

  • This week, Sebastian Asher reports, the Director of a bill airport has told journalists, but all international flights to and from a bill will be suspended from six in the evening, on Friday, she said she deeply regretted the decision, so you didn't only affect the Kurdish people, but the big international Community in the city, as well as refugees who use the airport, the number Of Middle Eastern airlines have already said that they'll be cancelling flights to Kurdistan in response to Baghdad's call for an air blockade following the independence vote.

  • Qatar Airways is the latest to announce it stopping flights as pressure builds on the Kurdish regional authorities Sebastian Asher.

  • So what's the feeling on the ground regarding a rackets Karen down some out of the past, our Middle East correspondent Tom Bateman, that's very nicely on the outskirts of the city of Beale lives as the year she turns the pages of a family photo album with an index finger stained purple the die was cast on the hand of every voter in this week's Kurdish referendum, O.K.. and this beautiful, it was, Ah, this is your father, O.K.. sphere here is in the snow.

  • And that's O.K., her family was buffeted in the turbulent history of northern Iraq's Kurds.

  • She spent much of Saddam Hussein's rule as a refugee in neighbouring Iran and recalls the arrival there children among those targeted him his regime's deadly gas attack on the city of her lab ger in a hospital.

  • There was all injured, just the babies from one month to nine months, and then I sow these babies, without any information they can't know their parents.

  • It was a tragedy.

  • What made you decide to come quit innovation in nineteen ninety eight a prize sink in all of the Iraq North lies on sold.

  • Because of this, we can return and jet Casa Bolo remembers all this history, he opened his music shop in a field in the nineteen fifties, when a generation here could recall an Imperial carve up of the region, the left.

  • Thirty million Kurds as minorities in four separate countries, there's docks that your lot over there, that's it.

  • He was a simpler place.

  • Back then, he tells me, but later it filled, he recalls has Saddam hit the villages and car Governor nearly fifteen years on from the U.S. led invasion, the relationship between Baghdad and the curds is under severe strain with territory oil revenues and budget payouts all in dispute.

  • The West frets all this distracts from the fight against so called Islamic state, but the Kurdish regions.

  • Foreign Minister fella staff are back here told me statehood was now inevitable.

  • No budget from Baghdad being engaged in these deadly and costly war, we have had a very tragic past, we have suffered.

  • We tried, they were her best to find the future.

  • Unfortunately, he did Bob word.

  • Therefore, we want a future.

  • This was the source of legitimacy with the people.

  • Of course, who gave a strong mandate and legitimate mandeep of the leadership to rot and negotiate independence celebrations continue for Iraqi Kurds, it is not only aspirations, their political leaders have raised, but also the steaks with Baghdad.

  • We didn't have any think in the past, but now very confident and optimistic, and I know we win, we will be free.

  • I see Our country, independent country will be established that that report from Tom Bateman in Erbil the Kurdish regional capital in northern Iraq, scientists and China, say they've performed a new and precise technique of gene editing on human embryos, for the first time, opening up the prospect of preventing inherited diseases, the team at sun Yat Sen University focus their research on the D.N.A. of embryos, which contain the blood disorder beta thalassaemia damned Damon spoke to Professor Robin Lovell badge had of stem cell biology and developmental genetics of the Francis Crick Institute here in London.

  • So how did the Chinese scientists do this so called, bass editing technique usually people talking about the scene and editing method, it's where they are and guide this, the system to a particular part of it.

  • Part of the D.N.A., and it cuts the D.N.A., and then it, it relies on endorsements processes occurring within cells to repair their D.N.A., and at the same time, you can introduce things make mate specific changes, I went on to lead jeans, or do whatever you want in this particular method, rather than cutting all the way through the D.N.A., it actually chemically alters one of the letters from a c. to a tee.

  • This was a perfect mechanism to using that for this particular disease, but thalassaemia was, we've got the other way around.

  • So, they're just reversing the mutation using this so called, bass, editing, and we've talk's not very long ago about Crisp out this amazing apparently relatively straightforward technique is straightforward, in order to edit D.N.A. sequences to correct disease, and this is even easier.

  • Isn't, I wouldn't say it's necessarily easier is based on exactly the same systems, it's the same components involved, but rather than using an enzyme that cuts there, use an enzyme that alters one of the lessons it has, I think, probably in ain't maybe an inbuilt inefficiency with it, because, although it can lead to what they were hoping to get, which was changing the base pair, where the mutation was back to, and I feel like the normal version, it can work both ways.

  • And actually, you can't control necessarily what you're going to get at the end, it can also occasionally the repair mechanism can decide what we don't want that mismatch.

  • Could you create a mismatch.

  • First, it just remove the whole thing which can create a different total mutation, they found both these things, probably were occurring in the cells, they tested their methods and in the early human embryos.

  • They test their methods on, it's not an ideal way of doing things.

  • Always, but it's worth exploring further, and maybe you could tweak it to make it do what you want more efficiently and more of the are you talking about letters just describe, so we can visualise this, and when you say a sequence of letters, what are you actually talking about its only only, it's not little bits A font has it, what is it.

  • It's not there are four bases in D.N.A. is short hand, they are called a A.C. t. envy.

  • This particular editing method converts a c. to a t. the D.N.A. is double stranded, so you have base pairs, and usually, of course, a sea will pair with a g. and t. will pair with an a., so when you convert the sea to a tea, then the other strand, you have a mismatch the diseases caused by a single letter, one base pair was wrong.

  • So it had a g. instead of L.A and so they want to now turn the Genie back into into an, I am, that's what they've done with this technique, in your view, how much to these techniques, the crisp further space editing offer hope to people who have this disease, there is actually very good hope thalassaemia sickle cell disease would be ones where they are either trials have started or about to start, because in, in this case is, you can take out the bone marrow stem cells do your do you know anything, and then put them back into the patient.

  • Other diseases, such as, let's say, muscular dystrophy, there's been a beautiful studies dumb animal models on minus to scale it up to use in humans is going to be challenge, but there's, there's hope when you're talking about manipulating the embryos, it'll be really hard to take the jump from doing their research To actually trying it for real or an implant in the embryos.

  • So we would have to have go through lots and lots of checks and balances to know that it was really going to work, not cause any problems, and then you have all the ethical issues on top, so it's going to be some time before we see quite some time before you see that, so people shouldn't get too excited about it.

  • At the moment, as an option to have a child, free of genetic disease, because we have an awful lot of more work to do.

  • Professor Robin Lovell badge from the Francis Crick Institute in London.

  • Hugh Hefner, the founder of Playboy magazine has died aged ninety one he achieved instant success with glossy photographs of naked women Hefner, first published Playboy in nineteen fifty three at its peak.

  • It sold seven million copies a month, and you have her later expanded into, casinos and night clubs with the rabbit's silhouette becoming one of the world's most recognisable logo us James cook looks back at his life.

  • Hugh Hefner was the teenage boy who never grew up, a pioneer of sexual liberation in the nineteen sixties money girls, night clubs, a corporate jet called big bunny or made possible by the magazine, he started at his kitchen table with Marilyn Monroe, as its first centrefold Playboy was an instant hit in its heyday it sold seven million copies a month, I suppose you're the world's Most famous hedonist is in a very public way.

  • Are you a happy man.

  • Oh yeah, Oh yeah, never more happy than Hugh Hefner or lived the lifestyle portrayed by his magazine, but feminist accused him of reducing women to sexual objects sales eventually dwindled, and he retired to his mansion where the partying continued at the age of eighty six, he married his third wife crystal Harris, a Playboy playmate sixty years his junior, you have no wasn't all about sex.

  • We also publish some great writing and fought in a quality he died at the Playboy mansion in L.A surrounded by friends.

  • The self styled godfather of the sexual revolution, James cook K.J. Matthews is an entertainment journalist who interviewed Hugh Hefner at the Playboy mansion, she shared her memory of the experience with Plummer Donald, I grew up in los Angeles in English team, which was for quite some time.

  • And at the time I was working for us.

  • And I had these kind of ideas of what the Playboy mansion was like, what's this kind of me, and would be like that with you know how these nude models in mirrors, year after year, on remand he really turned out just be very gentlemanly really nice, very caring and I was pleasantly surprised to learn about all of his social activism was really into civil rights in person in their right and those were things that I really didn't know about him, just because I had, You know, kind of heard of him as being this womaniser, a realist one valley guy, it was constantly surrounded by one me and him had multiple Royal friends, and it was really interesting to see another facet of this gig I cut when it's really interesting, isn't it.

  • Because it's almost like a tale of two men, because we have this vision of him as the old guy's surrounded by the very young women in the mansion in his later years text from a listener, Conrad Christian's been attached from los Angeles, he says this, of him a true pioneer in the battle for free speech, an American icon.

  • He defended lenny Bruce the comic when he was arrested for obscenity people forget that nightclub acts couldn't cruise in public in the nineteen fifties and sixties until people I have not fought for free speech, he very much said, you know, I'm not oppressing women.

  • I'm not exploiting them.

  • This is, I'm a libertarian.

  • This is what I'm about and amps, and it was true to a certain extent, wasn't it.

  • He was, he was, he was a fair and guard.

  • He was really a Maverick and not what people don't know, you know, want when I went to his House back in meet you at the time, there was a documentary coming out by a filmic about any met Bridget BRM in a documentary was called Hugh Hefner Playboy activists and rebel and one of the things I learned about him.

  • When I saw the film and interviewed him, and a filmmaker was set, you know, he was friends with the separate activist Jesse Jackson and new Martin Luther King, junior, and I had no idea that he had many conversations with them to try to help, they'll fight for or civil rights, any quality in America, and I think a lot of people don't know all the things that he was doing behind the scenes to try to make sure everybody had first in the grapes in that everybody could you not just have basic human rights in this country, entertainment, journalist K.J. Matthews, you're listening to global news, the most important stories and the best interviews, and on the spot.

  • Reporting from the B.B.C. world service now news about how you can vote for what's going to be included in the final episode of a B.B.C. world service podcast series fifty things that made the modern economy.

  • Here's Tim Harford fifty think stemming the modern, I couldn't stick to fifty, I'm going for fifty one.

  • So what thing.

  • Should I be making an extra special podcast the credit card glass, the global positioning system, irrigation, the pencil all to spread.

  • These are all suggestions that came from a podcast listeners, and now you can vote for, which will be the fifty first thing that made the modern vote online now at B.B.C. world service dot com slash fifty one things that's five one where you'll Also find full terms and conditions.

  • Voting closes at twelve noon, on Friday, the sixth of October twenty seventy and now back to our own podcast Japan's Parliament has been dissolved.

  • Ahead of a snap election next month, called by the Prime Minister, so zo Abi, he's been getting support for his handling of the North Korea crisis, but he faces a significant challenge from one of his own former Ministers he Rococo y. k. from Tokyo Rupert Wingfield Hayes reports, Prime Minister, so Abby's decision to call a snap election next month has unleashed a dramatic shift in Japanese politics, the main opposition, democratic party has in effect decided to abolish itself, the party is throwing its support behind the popular Governor of Tokyo Yuriko on Monday Miz call U.K. announced the formation of a new political party called hope.

  • The aim is to present a United front in the hope of defeating Mister Abi's liberal democratic party Rupert Wingfield in Japan.

  • When it comes to the story of Indian independence from British colonial rule in nineteen forty seven Mahatma Gandhi, and his colleagues are known worldwide, even hailed as heroes for advocating a non violent struggle back at seeing is someone you might not have heard off and had a very different approach.

  • And yet, today, on the one hundred and tenth anniversary of his birth is being celebrated by the Prime Minister and end remedy and tributes to him, are being widely shared on social media Are South Asia, editor, John, a gibbering has more, he was a very passionate young man in the nineteen twenties, a revolutionary Socialist, he wrote extensively about the need to fight for freedom and the struggle involved in that, and he became involved in a more radical movement frustrated, I think, with people like Gandhi, who were, as you say, espousing a non violent approach, and he felt that wasn't enough, there, sometimes the ends justified the means and you did have to use violent in order to achieve a political end, he was convicted by the British.

  • A couple of offences when was that he was involved in a bomb attack on the the fledgling Parliament, the Assembly of the day, but also, he was one of two men who shot dead a young British police Officer, and basically, he was hanged in nineteen thirty one, but also became very well known, while he was in prison because he led a quite controversial in high profile hunger strike demanding that he and some other prisoners should be treated as political prisoners should have more rights.

  • In fact, the British saw them as common criminals because they said that you've been you haven't you're not in prison because of your political ideals, you're in prison because of the things you've done, including murder, and what does the Prime Minister and remote, he said about him today.

  • Well, he's used quite powerful language.

  • Um, he saluted him on Twitter, no end Of Modi uses Twitter quite a lot, saying, I bow to the brave Marta bhagat Singh his greatness and exemplary courage inspires generations and Indians there seems to be much more of a cult, as it were, a sense of veneration around him.

  • At the moment, and briefly.

  • Why do you think the Prime Minister has chosen to speak about him.

  • I think there is a sense that this is a, this is a right wing Hindu nationalist government, although actually bhagat Singh and declared himself an atheist and in his own life.

  • And I think that they are, there is a sense that they are looking for points of national unity and a sort of rallying cries and as part of that process are appropriating some of these revolutionary figures, I'm giving them a sense of rehabilitation Gilman covering changes in the laws of cricket of being introduced, which will give umpires the power to send off players for Sirius must conduct, there'll also be new restrictions on bad sizes, a sports news correspondent Alex capstick reports.

  • It's known as the gentlemen's game, but cricket has not been without incidents of bad behaviour.

  • And now, for the first time, officials on the pitch can punish the worst culprits, with the ultimate sanction.

  • It means those guilty of making deliberate physical contact with players or umpires or threatening violence could be dismissed for the rest of the match.

  • Under the new rules, they won't be the drama of a red Card.

  • Instead, the offending players Captain will be asked by the umpire to remove him from the field.

  • It's one of several changes announced by the m. c. c. the custodian of the game.

  • It's laws manager is Fraser Stewart, there's always been sanctions, but they've been after the game, so a player might receive a suspension after in the sort of thing, but we felt that if someone is doing that sort of the fence, they don't really deserve to carry on to play in the game, and perhaps one hundred to win the game for their side, and we have had in football, we have, and in rugby.

  • It is well known, and sadly, it's a move, we have had to taken cricket.

  • Just to give those umpires a bit more power at their silly umpires will also have the power to ban big bat, and the new size limits the permitted length and width remains the same, but edges cannot be more than forty millimetres thick and sixty seven millimetres in depth officials will carry her gaze to check on their legality is designed to make it a fair, a contest for the bowler's Australia's Vice Captain and opening batsman David Warner is one player who must now find a new bat Alex cabs.

  • Now, it's the stuff of nightmares for many a rat that weighs nearly a kilo and has teeth sharp enough to North through a coconut now, for the first time, researchers have Found it, nicknamed, a Vicar on the Solomon islands in the South Pacific.

  • Up to now, it had been part of local folklore Tyrone library from Chicago's field Museum told us more about the giant rat, they belong to the family, we call tree rats, sometimes called mosaic tailed rats or giant rats.

  • This is the only animal that's ever been captured of this species, and we didn't get a weight for her, but we estimate based on other species that are similar, that it would be around half a kilogram insight on other Solomon islands, there's been rats, which were discovered the scribes back in about eighteen hundreds and early nineteen hundreds and then haven't been seen since.

  • So there was a little bit of fear.

  • Perhaps this species did exist, but it might have already gone extinct.

  • So we're unsure whether it was still around to be found on Vanga.

  • No, there's a lot of logging occurring by commercial companies, and this one animal that we've been able to find so far, actually came from an area that was being logged my co-author, it cane is actually from this Community called Sara likely they're protecting their area of Vanga new forest as a conservation area, and we're really hopeful that that will be enough to allow this ratty not go extinct.

  • That traditional knowledge of people, one thing gonna they say that Vicar is able to eat coconuts I haven't evidence of that.

  • Yet it doesn't mean They can't do it, but we have found that they another number, which is called a gnarly that, and that's quite a thick shelled, but much smaller than that, and we found it quite a few places.

  • I'm going to where the rats have been eating these nuts.

  • They're able to chew holes through the show of than that which is really quite thick or theme park Emma Netherlands is about to begin an experiment designed to remove the need to waiting queues for rides and a hologram boarded a rollercoaster to find out how it works.

  • Seven million people visit Saint this theme park.

  • Every year during peak times.

  • So the average wait to get on one of these rides is about horse, the new system means you can't just turn up in Kew.

  • Instead, you'll have to book an exact time slot in advance, either on the existing f. or in real life.

  • On one of their newly installed, they call it virtual waiting Charon coupling from after Ling has come to explain how it works.

  • Two machines, two separate machines, it looks, sort of like he'll find the right, they'll find a slot to see where they can, of course, we had to bring your part of the report from on the board.

  • There, they're real, they're posters, and the, I'm Pierre is to minimise the waiting and Maxim.

  • It also means you're a lock survey to a schedule in a place you'd normally associate with a Skipping them carrying copper min egg analogy has visitors will have to make sacrifices.

  • It's clear that you have to make a choice.

  • If you really want to have this right and want to make sure to make a choice.

  • O.K., this is not a fast pass it is already, I think, means you don't get priority reduces your waiting.

  • We want to know is if people if I, none of us with chaos.

  • Isn't the spontaneity, part of the attraction for me, that would take why some of the fun away because of me more kids on the telephones, watching the airport, they like, Oh, no, we going to, we have to build this wall, where you just want to be parky, just go everyone just finding a Texan you want to go.

  • And I don't think the park.

  • I think that will be in a group.

  • And what do you want a biscuit.

  • It's going, I think it's really bad, but we like to plan thing share the fish.

  • This their engineers are in touch with others and say they're willing to share their technology will be to see if advanced timeslot booking Hughes without ruining these realms of fantasy and freedom.

  • I'm a hologram in the Netherlands, and that's all from us.

  • For now, but an updated version of the global news podcast or be available for you to download.

  • Later, if you want to comment on this podcast of the topics covered in it, you can Send us an email.

  • The address is global podcast had B.B.C. dot.

  • C.O. dot U.K. I'm Danny Cox until next time.