Theresa Hugh Hefner Washington, Theresa Tower Tina Simon King Rory Kath Rory Catherine Jones Owen Kristen Hi Kristen Heiberg Kristan Hi Jones Joan Smith Jane Smith Ike Sally Empire, Tina Curtis Reza Collar Claire Jude Japan Us Britain Norway Turkey Kurdistan Iraq Uk Tokyo Sweden Baghdad America London United States Uk Germany Bahamas York Wylfa Vilnius Vic Venus Us Pasion Lowe Lithuania Ireland Iran Hudson Institute Ghana France Faye Europe Erbil Dow Dover Canada Calais Ankara Accra

World Business Report 2017-09-28:15:04.00
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  • This is world business report from the B.B.C. world service, Hello.

  • I'm Roger hearing coming up on the programme, the election campaign begins in Japan.

  • As a base seeks a stronger mandate, but a new, strong opposition Challenger has emerged as a he bore unless we give hope to everyone and grasped this wave of reform to change Japan.

  • I think this is the last chance for Japan to change in a big steady way, but you when you're not there.

  • He must also flights suspended in the Kurdistan regional government area of northern Iraq as Baghdad tightens the screws after the independence referendum.

  • What are the risks of a transatlantic trade war in the dispute between bowing and the Canadian company bombard e. a., I think we just now entering the first Faye is of trump trying to deliver on his protectionist policy how Norway manages smooth, high tech border controls and Hugh Hefner is dead.

  • He was the founder of Playboy, but was he a sexual revolutionary or an exploiter of women, I can honestly say that I made some of the best friends and created some of the best memories and Playboy enabled me to do that.

  • You have a ball, I don't only you, woody, sure, or walk that was Japan's Parliament being dissolved and the election campaign, getting underway in that country.

  • The Prime Minister should so Abby called this snap vote in an Attempt to increase his majority, the third longest serving p. m. in post war Japan seems confident he can keep the electorate with him, you're your hundred Sir a difficult battle starts today.

  • This is an election about how to protect the lives of people and enough, but he's facing an interesting challenge you Rico Coy Cavey, Governor of Tokyo.

  • And one of my hobbies former Ministers has founded her own opposition group, the party of hope, and she's now won the backing of the main opposition, democratic party, she told a press conference in Tokyo.

  • She was the candidate of chain Ziggy keep or unless we give hope to everyone and grasped this wave of reform to change Japan.

  • I think this is the last chance for Japan to change in a big steady way that, and I don't like that thought you when you're that he must, so efficient, so a Bay, there is a bit of uncertainty about the outcome could he, like Britain's Prime Minister, Theresa may earlier this year end up making his situation worse.

  • I've been speaking to Max society Tokyo Bureau Chief of market news.

  • International, it was a bit of a gamble for Arby's ruling party., L.T., p. you can be good news or bad news.

  • If it's good news for Abi's party, the opposition remains fragment it, then, then they can't really join hands together, because they're a bunch of different parties and agree on, or the policies, the bad news, Could be that they me, nor the differences and Courtney in the field in the candidates, I guess.

  • A lot depends on the personality Yuriko croquet, the Governor of Tokyo, cos, she's the one who leads this new party that the democratic party might be supporting is she someone, do you think you could be an effective Challenger titians are a bit, she's a survivor, and she's gone through many political parties on the national level.

  • In this, she's shown real leadership as the Governor of Tokyo by weeing in the torture Assembly elections in them.

  • Why, so you can be the biggest threat and others trying to downplay it, saying that confronting with each other.

  • But, of course, they are, in the end, rivals.

  • I mean it.

  • Do they have a very different personal style.

  • Yes, I know they're both conservative also competing in in a very simplified election campaign phrases like the two dozen twelve selections by saying we will regain Japan now kids saying we, well, we said, what about ordinary Japanese people do they look on these sort of disputes with great passion order order later, see you in a way as choosing a new manager for a political system that pretty much work, I spoke to some voters yesterday and today, um, I could feel voter apathy and lot of people are disappointed with the democratic party, because they would do anything to win seeds really presenting credible policy plans of gauze so that we Don't want to go for voting, but they're not sure who they were, vote for, I suppose, the other issue as well.

  • He's having a woman Prime Minister, potentially, I mean, Japan has never had one, are they ready for what I think they are.

  • There are more business leaders who, well, we're men, but would people be happy to accept a woman Prime Minister, all there some very traditionalist, do you think that might, in fact, stop her winning.

  • I don't think that's the issue in your girl, because we see so many corporate leaders and also a party leaders who are we men haven't says.

  • So there is this very conservative right mentality sentiment among some politicians and the voters, too, but I don't think that's going to stop people from trying for the leadership Max satyrs market news into now, the Kurdish regional government in northern Iraq is in crisis.

  • This week, a referendum showed massive public support for breaking away from Iraq, but the government in Baghdad, declared it was illegitimate.

  • And now, a series of measures by them and their regional allies, Turkey and Iran are threatening the k. argies economy, the borders have been closed.

  • All flights in or out for being suspended from Friday evening, Turkey is now told all its citizens to leave to laugh Ike Sally is the Director of the k. argies main airport in a bill.

  • The decision say that all fly if Claire Jude did not hand over The airport back there, then all international flight.

  • I'm going to be stuffed, except the intern off like what just run by Iraqi Airways with military and some exceptional light that cross mission, the crisis risks crushing what's become a highly successful economy inside a de facto independent part of Iraq, Lufthansa, Austrian airlines and British Airways will have regular direct flights to peel and have been substantial foreign direct investment in the k. r. g. over recent years, joining me now live is the bee bee sees mark Lowe in who is in Erbil mug.

  • How is the Kurdistan regional government, dealing with all this pressure from outside.

  • At the moment, Roger they say they can deal with it for a few days, at least they say that the blockade should be lifted by the Iraqi government, they say that it's come to pretend productive, and they're willing to engage in talks with the Iraqi government in Baghdad, but Baghdad has replied saying that they were only going to talks if the Kurdistan regional government and moles, the independence referendum, which resulted in a ninety two percent vote in favour, so you really, you're getting this impression.

  • Now that the Iraqi government is applying extreme pressure.

  • They're suspending these international flights.

  • Tomorrow, I arrived a little early today on one of the last flights to landed at the airport, but from tomorrow, from Friday evening once they're suspended.

  • That is a major waves of tightening the screw, you've Got the Turkish government's lashing out and saying that they're no longer going to train Iraqi military personnel matters Peche mug.

  • There's talk of a build up and restrictions on the land, water, leading to Turkey.

  • So all of these kind of regional powers for powers flexing their muscles sabre rattling.

  • The Iraqi government deeply frustrated at the Kurds went ahead without their consent.

  • So has Curtis Reza box itself into a corner.

  • What can actually now do with that.

  • Ninety two percent vote in favour of independence, and also a pretty successful part of Iraq, it's its economy.

  • I know he's done very well.

  • These links that it has two to Europe or very important, this is going to smother the economy, at least in the short term, it is, but the thing that is keeping the courage economy afloat is oil.

  • The Kurdistan regional government exports oil pipeline in cut cook, which was a dispute was a disputed part of the country, the Vic at the Kurds, tried to take as part of the aorta to try to include as part of the independence referendum government.

  • It's pewter, so the oil pipeline cut cooked to the Turkish Mediterranean port of Jihad and so that is why really when Turkey lashed out at the Kurdish authorities for holding this referendum, you get the impression that the that the rhetoric from Ankara is actually different publicly to privately because, actually, that oil pipeline keeps at feeds the Turkish energy needs.

  • It keeps the courage economy afloat.

  • So if Turkey really wants to tighten the screws, they would turn off the oil pipeline, which which really accounts for ninety per cent of Kurdish of their courage economy, they haven't done yet.

  • And so, and until that happens if and when that happens, then the Curragh Connolly really is going to be in dire Straits, but as long as oil continues to flow, the cutter start economy can continue to flourish and mugger priest.

  • You've just arrived, and we did see lots of signs, after the referendum of triumphant scenes in the streets of Erbil and elsewhere in Kurdistan.

  • Do you get a sense now that people seem, perhaps they've bitten off rather more than they can chew.

  • At the moment, I don't think that I've just spoken to at it to some people as um, as I was coming in and govern officials, they th, they are still very much feeling that this was a triumph of democracy that for for years, the Kurds have wanted an independent region.

  • Here, they feel that this is now the basis of statehood talks, they don't believe that they have missed played their hand.

  • But of course, if the blockade intensifies if the Iraqi government continues to apply even more pressure on the your government in the coming days.

  • Then, of course, that confidence could begin to fade and mood.

  • He could begin to sound mark.

  • Thank you very much, mark well in their Lives on the line from Derby.

  • Now, let's have a look at what's been happening on the share market astronomy here in the studio in London is Russ mould of A.J Bell Russ, first of all, I mean, there was the announcement, of course, yesterday in the U.S from Donald trump about his plans for tax reform, how the market's responded to that Wylfa swallow policing something a little bit more substantial, we got in the spring, nine pages, rather than one, but it's still not fully funded, but for all of that, the Maquis come to the conclusion that he means U.S. economy will grow quicker inflation Maria's quicker interest rates may go up more quickly.

  • So therefore, the dollar is up bombs, which are traded government loans are down, he's maiming, there'll be other better ways of earning interest and stocks are broadly flat because, although it may mean that American corporate earnings grow more quickly higher interest rates are generally bad for stocks Goldman's accident report saying one point off U.S. tax is about three quarters of per cent on American company profits to the cut that Mister trump's talking about a twelve per cent increase, but don't forget the U.S. stock market.

  • At nineteen percent since he became presents a lot of may already factored into the into valuations and talking over transatlantic relations as well.

  • In all that we know about the bombard your dispute.

  • In fact, we'll be talking at the moment, the Canadian Company facing massive tariffs from America because of a dispute with bowing is that beginning to have an effect as well, it is it shares a very weak and actually won ear, which is quartz in Canada is actually under attack on two fronts.

  • This got this tariff problem with President trump and relations between the U.K. and the U.S.A.. it's also seen emerged beating took between two of its biggest competitors in rail equipment manufacturing seaman's of Germany.

  • Ultima France, so ulcer mix the trout en Grande vitesse Siemens is the I.C.A., they're big competitive on body and then, I've got a formidable European upon it to compete with as well, and staying in the Ryanair.

  • Now there's a name, I can see the look on your face, but it's, it's been a bad few days or weeks, even for them with all these cancellations is beginning to affect their their share price, I don't like the share price actually just started to weaken today, interesting as you went up yesterday, when I was the latest round of cancellations that was more because they said that they weren't looking at buying the Italian airline Alitalia, they've got enough on their plate, without taking on those problems, but they do was having annoyed their customers and annoyed their pilots, they've now annoyed the British regulator, the civil aviation authority, so there now fighting a battle on three fronts.

  • All right, Russ thanks very much.

  • Indeed, I'm sure hear more about That, in terms of numbers here in London, the one hundred share index little moved at the moment.

  • Seventy three thirteen in York, the Dow is down, not one per cent twenty two thousand three hundred and eleven now Britain's Prime Minister, Theresa may has delivered the latest warning.

  • Yet, in the U.S., to the U.S., a plane, make a bowing over this growing dispute, which mentioned just now over the massive U.S. tariffs threatened against the Canadian company bombard Britain is concerned, because bombard E.A. employs thousands of people, making it see series planes in northern Ireland missus may set on Thursday Boeing's behaviour in pursuing the case, through the U.S Department of commerce was undermining its commercial relationship with Britain, I've been speaking to the distinguished economist Owen stilts or of the Hudson Institute custom is there a risk of a growing transatlantic trade war.

  • Now, as some U.K. Newspapers are suggesting remember it is, it's only three months ago, there are your Prime Minister, and my President sat down, and he agreed.

  • We were going to have this gigantic free trade agreement.

  • No, now we've got already the first fired in its over airplanes, you have to see it in the context of America, right.

  • President trump needs a win, he's lost a lot of things, and Simon King is Lee with that need, he's got now have the negotiation.

  • She's got here, planes, he's got washing machines.

  • He's got solar panels, and he's got South Korean Cars and steel are just about to be honest.

  • Desk, you guys in the Canadians happened to come first rider have they now have time, so he had he now has to put up and shut up, I was shut up on trade policy, what he's going to do to put up is to put some swinging carrots on bomber DAs.

  • A new airplane, which was designed to break up the do up of here buyers and bowing so woodall threats from Theresa may that to this good do bad things.

  • To contact between bowing, in the U.K government, the contracts that already exist.

  • Would that make any difference.

  • I think this sweep toward protectionism is now fully underway, I think, from what I hear in Washington, Theresa may's threats are not credible, because they would hurt Britain, more than the United States if they tried to cancel these helicopter another counteracts that you guys have with us.

  • So I think we're just now entering the first phase of trump trying to deliver on his protectionist policy, it's rather ironic because both her parties to this dispute that bowing and bombed by the a. have been beneficiaries of substantial state subsidies and that's with you, accusing each other of doing a lot of people in Britain are again, saying, well, what does this or go for post bricks it free trade relations across the Atlantic to which were much trumpeted, well, I think they were much trumpet is as much Of Mister trump wants the trumpet by, it will have to be in the context of a policy, which he will decide what affects American jobs.

  • And I think one advantage at least have the British have is that you don't threaten jobs in industries in the old manufacturing industries, of which I hear about, which is concerned, so unlike Germany, for example, which threatens jobs in our automobile industry.

  • Jag why really does not are not significantly, so there is an advantage in there's another advantage, apparently, I'm a very, very good working relationship between your Prime Minister, and my present, do you think.

  • Now, we were in a much less pally area of trade relations.

  • Internationally, led by the U.S., that we are going to see much more of this kind of attacks on each other.

  • In a way, and this is the future of international trade, President trump was elected, we call those, the people who supported free trade in the United States were insensitive to the consequences.

  • It had on the working class in America.

  • Here it enriched as globalisation Darla's in enriched already rich people, and it hurt entire communities in America, instead of addressing the problem on the people who are for free trade kept talking about the virtues of free trade, in the aggregate, rather than its effects in the particular, and that's why we've gotten to this mess.

  • We're in, where we've elected a President, who is now going to change the Tudor round of protectionism.

  • It was Erwin stilts, you're listening to the B.B.C. world service, the world's radio station, Hello, to our listeners in Accra in Ghana, one.

  • Oh, one point three F.M. and in Vilnius in Lithuania on ninety five point five, now, the U.K. has ambitions to run as smooth a border with the e. u. s. possible following bricks it without long queues of Laurie's waiting for customs checks will Norway, which isn't an E.U. Member has a thousand mile long border with sweeten, which is the Norwegians claim that a mix of technology and co operation with their neighbours makes, there's the smoothest running border operation in the world, a technology correspondent Rory Catherine Jones has been to see how it works.

  • Well, I'm driving across the bridge which connects Norway to sweeten, and I have to say, it's a pretty simple experience I've chosen the green lane.

  • Nothing to declare, and there I am, I'm now in Sweden, pretty friction is not quite so simple.

  • If you're an honest truck driver, declaring goods on the way.

  • Thirteen hundred lorries crossing here.

  • Each day, but the border agreement between Norway outside the E.U., and Sweden, a Member cuts down on the bureaucracy, and they're using technology to speed things up, I don't think there's any border in the world, that's so smooth really Kristen Heiberg runs the Norwegian customers posted three innocent and is proud of its efficiency transaction time.

  • Here is about four minutes and The waiting time is about the same when you deal with us, it's about eight minutes in the control room customs officers are looking at screens monitoring dozens of border crossings, many of them unmanned there looking, I think my work in the neck recognition systems, and we can see, of course, passing over the borders, a big star so Lucy some shipments, we'll always have to be stopped and checked, but more technology is at hand to help Kristen Hi begins officers look inside a lorry, and they are using ariela capable scanner was x. rayed to look through the cars to see if there's any discrepancy, it's a big investment, but it increases the volume more, we are able to control fault, yes, for now, though, they're still friction at this border, in the form of the documents drivers have to show to the multi lingual customs officers by mid afternoon, there's quite a crowd building up and lorry drivers, aren't all impressed with the efficiency of this operation, it's not fast enough.

  • It very slowly, so they could work harder treat their customers, but sometimes you get a bit impatient waiting here, they must be page reborn Pasion so you were impressed.

  • Yeah, you'd love it.

  • Do you think they could make it faster.

  • No, I don't think so, because you must check their pay.

  • Can the U.K., learn from this border as it prepares for Brecht's region and vida Gunderson from Sweden, worked for their Country's customer services.

  • Collaborator, it is possible to set up solution, the crossing's without stopping, but it's her Allergy is there already, it would involve lorry drivers, having, I don't know, a smart phone Apple having some system in the lorry, which said, you're clear, you can go absolutely that's possible.

  • You have to work on this together, and everyone has to see this as common a challenge, don't you.

  • Hmm..

  • Hmm..

  • That's Venus and the main crossing between Norway and Sweden handles less than a tenth of a lorry traffic between Dover and Calais and Norway has a closer relationship with the E.U. than Britain is planning Kristan Hi buggered from Norwegian customs thinks a good brakes, it deal is vital for the U.K.. if you don't get any agreement.

  • It's a big problem, because everything out.

  • It's not that they have had the clear everything, if you don't have a Corporation, they'll have to stop on both sides of the border area.

  • There's a lot of red, so I wish you the best of luck, really, that report by Rory Kath and Jones on the Swedish, Norwegian now Hugh Hefner was a man who divided opinion, the founder of the Playboy magazine.

  • Empire, who's just died aged ninety one was either the godfather of a sexual revolution, bringing female nudity into the public sphere, and supporting liberal causes and good journalism, or he was an exploiter of women and a purveyor of smut or even pornography.

  • Here he Is, in his own words, and those who know me already sentry are very real romantic, and I know that I'm living out, despite some objections from saw the quarters, a great many peoples, they had a sea, and they are a lesson very seasonal, they're paying to see from childhood, and I'm a bio, whatever the lost touch with the boy that include the Playboy magazine.

  • The Playboy clubs, the Playboy mansion, the bunny girls dressed her till eight with bunny ears and a fluffy white tail.

  • It was all part of a nineteen sixties and seventies culture that now seems almost quaint the British author and journalist, Joan Smith sees him in that context.

  • He's born in nineteen twenty six, he's already an established publisher.

  • By the time the sixties come along, and I think he was in a position to kind of be parasitic on that huge explosion of energy of the baby boom generation, they were post war, they were questioning everything, their parents had wanted everything their parents are done, including everything about sex and who else was there.

  • Where else could you turn, but Playboy, I think, probably more important than Playboy was the development of the pill.

  • The scientists who developed the contraceptive pill, I was very conscious of being part of a generation of women who could control fertility.

  • I also remember just how few images, they were of women's bodies.

  • At that time.

  • And, you know, a Playboy was there, And I think there was a brief moment when he could pose as a kind of, you know, a champion of liberation, and so on.

  • But, you know, he ends up as this sad old guy who, at the age of eighty six, he marries a woman.

  • Sixty years younger than him.

  • I mean, that's quite an infantile fantasy.

  • You read about the accounts of many women who actually spent time in the Playboy mansion and were summoned to his bedroom night after night and expected to have sex with him, one after the other.

  • It's a very old fashioned male fantasy.

  • I think he has very little legacy, except he's part of that whole celebrity culture, there was a reality T.V. programme wasn't there about the Playboy mansion.

  • He becomes part of that culture are celebrity, lots of people have built multi million dollar business Empires are not contributed much in the progress of humanity.

  • Jane Smith will for a different perspective.

  • Let's hear now from one of the people who actually worked in his Empire, Tina Priestman worked as a bunny girl in the London Club from nineteen eighty to nineteen eighty two, and then transferred to the Bahamas.

  • Until that Club closed in nineteen eighty four, it was hard work, it wasn't quite as glamorous as everyone may think, but it is basically, it was just that uniform, which was cute and fun with which had a little bunny tail, which had had by a Tower and Collar and cuffs bow tie, which was cute, not degrading or humiliating was a lot of people, perhaps much I never felt that way for an instant.

  • It was my choice to go to the interview, I just thought it was, it was fun and glamorous, really, that's the way that I looked at it, I never felt degraded in any way, shape or form.

  • What about the attitude of the people there, because the whole Playboy essence, I suppose, is glamorous girls there.

  • I mean, do people cross the line, sometimes was the harassment, I never experienced any of that there were no lines crossed, because we were looked after very, very well, and all of the bunnies, they had an eye kept on the management kept an eye on them.

  • So they were no chances of any lines being class whatsoever.

  • What do you think of the whole Playboy image something see this very dated now, but do you think it's something that was gloom.

  • It's time, and perhaps something that we've helped quite a few.

  • I've really, really, for me, it's certainly helped me help shape my life help shape my personality, it opens up opportunities that I otherwise wouldn't have had, and I can honestly say that I made some of the best friends and created some of the best memories and Playboy enabled me to do that.

  • Do you think it's study era is over now, do you think that whole thing about that whole Big because of the way women are now perceived that you just doesn't really work in the in the twenty first.

  • I really hope not.

  • Yes, times have changed, and with their political correctness that I think sometimes, he's a bit crazy.

  • Really, so I hope I really do hope that it hasn't.

  • Do you know what you did was a good thing.

  • I'm here, we obviously did to make money.

  • And it was hugely successful, but you think it was actually a good thing I do, I cannot say a bad word about Playboy.

  • It's the girl's choice, it was their choice to go and work for them, and I think it's the freedom of choice, they'd ladies, all the people that doesn't agree with, they don't have to be any part of it, say, those of us that did it was fantastic.

  • Tina policeman who was a bunny girl in the Playboy Club in London, and also in the Bahamas, reflecting on whoever has died at the age of ninety, one that's Wilbur's report.