Norman Merkel Tom Bateman Michael Bristow Elizabeth Davies Angela Merkel Professor Stuart Phidel Paul Henley Paul Norman Bryant Neda Tawfiq Mister Rees Mcguinness Kirk Kim Jong Jonathan Blake Joanne I Jonathan Blake Hillary Clinton Henley Helen Briggs Helen Hannah Dollard Frogger Emma Ahmed Duke University Damien Mcguinness Clinton Chancellor Merkel Berlin, Damien Bbc Graham North Korea Us York Germany Baghdad Kurdistan Asia United States Pyongyang Iman Washington Uk Turkey South Korea Philadelphia Iraq Iran India Us United Arab Emirates Supreme Court Mumbai Mcneil London Lartigue Kurdistan Region Hattie Europe Erbil Egypt City Of Kirk Abid

Global News Podcast 2017-09-25:23:10.00
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  • This is the B.B.C. for details of a complete range of programmes go to B.B.C. world service dot com forward slash, Welcome to the latest global news compiled in the early hours of the morning.

  • On Tuesday, the twenty sixth of September, I Jonathan Blake, with a selection of highlights from across B.B.C. world service news today coming up absurd.

  • That's how the white House has described North Korea's contention that President trumps warning to the leadership in Pyongyang amounted to a declaration of war.

  • We'll hear from an Asia analyst, it's still the same rhetoric, and it's obviously not a good sign when someone has to say, Hey, actually were not declaring war on the station, also in the podcast Chancellor Merkel has vowed to win back German voters who deserted her party for the far right A.F. de but said it won't mean a lurch to the right votes are being counted after Kurds turned out in huge numbers in a referendum for independence from Iraq in defiance of fierce opposition from Baghdad and other regional powers and later, how technology is helping her dress, the decline in suitable habitats for giant pandas remote sensing satellite imagery, and then use that information to come up with recommendations how better to manage this iconic threatened species.

  • But first, the white House has dismissed as absurd.

  • The North Korean foreign Ministers claim that President trump has declared war on Pyongyang.

  • That was what really young.

  • How is said to reporters outside his new York hotel in response to President trumps tweets over the weekend that the North Korean leadership would not be around much longer, more than four angle.

  • So, all the Member States of the United Nations and the whole world should clearly remember that it was the U.S. who first declared war on our country, the U.N. Charter stipulates individual Member States rights to self defence, since the United States declared war on a country, we will have every right to respond, including the rights to shoot down the United States strategic bombers, even when they're not yet inside our space those remarks by North Korea prompted the United Nations Chief Antonia good to declare a rise in rhetoric between Washington and Pyongyang would only increase the risk of what he called misunderstandings Paul Henley spoke to Isaac stone fish and international Affairs journalist and senior fellow at the Asia society based in new York, and he asked him with the white House now saying that it hasn't declared war on North Korea does this change anything, it's still the same rhetoric, and it's obviously not a good sign when someone has to say, Hey, actually were not declaring war on this nation.

  • What about U.S. planes flying close to North Korea.

  • This past weekend, albeit in international airspace, how much of a provocation.

  • Do you think that was intended to be a. and b. was was that We intend to be a publication, but I think we have to remember with North Korea's response was that they say things in such absurd beef three grin manner, is that we don't really know how much they actually feel provoked and how much they're just doing their strange form of brinkmanship.

  • So what is the world to make have a statement like that from the foreign Minister Mister Rees, saying that was now inevitable quotes that North Korea would target the U.S. mainland with its rockets.

  • I think nice career it to different other way trumped as doesn't believe what it says, has no compunction about going back on statements that it makes that it's been fascinating do a Google search and look at other times they have used the phrase, declaration of war and half a dozen times, at least in the last five years, that they used so much onion articles from October, two thousand sex, where'd she was called, Kim Jong ill interprets sunrise as act of war, marking the North Koreans for saying that anything anyone was doing amounted to a declaration of war.

  • Right.

  • Should this be a reassurance.

  • Then, we've been there before.

  • Nothing happened.

  • I think it's a reassurance and North Korea can say a lot of relief aggressive things and back down quite easily.

  • I think what's worryingly different.

  • Here's trump and cramps seeming inability to forget a slight, and it is black have steady hands, I'm in this Chris us.

  • Now you believe, don't you that the U.S. and North Korea have been closer to war in history.

  • Relatively recent history.

  • Can you give us an example.

  • Nineteen sixty nine nice, clean, fighter jets down did American spy plane enjoying all thirty one Americans are bright and next in we considered responding with nuclear weapons, but decided that restrain was a better option.

  • He was very much read Ahmad in a nineteen seventies sex to North Korean soldiers, we're using axes and knives killed two Americans who were in the D.M.Z. which separates North and South Korea and Gerald order time responded with a show at nods her in my, but without actually firing I nice career in territory without actually carrying nice crayons and that also was able to die.

  • I saw it, this situation and that happened under a different President ship, of course, how much of a wild card in all this.

  • Do you think the trump Presidency is, it's a huge wild card.

  • I mean trump has white almost throughout the year of pollen for experienced ever.

  • So we really don't know how he's going to respond in the face of a crisis.

  • If this crisis crows.

  • And we also don't know if he feels increasingly embattled at home and its core members continue trout, if you will feel incentivise incentivised chin up to some sort of international crisis.

  • So that is more popular that last part is very, very worrying to me, if we talk About just a war of words, we can't really step it up another notch can wait than the situation at the moment, it's, it's a good question.

  • Then I guess the fans on how creators trumped air, a nice plain state mediators trump. is said that the North Koreans were now with fire and fury, frankly, power, the likes of which the world has never seen, and it's hard to go beyond bad.

  • I wouldn't underestimate trap on that Isaac, stonefish and international Affairs journalist and senior fellow at the Asia society based in new York and staying with career, the B.B.C. has launched its new Korean service, it's part of an expansion of the broadcasters foreign language stations B.B.C. Graham is one of twelve new services, Asia Pacific editor Michael Bristow has this report, I know what a, Nigger you got the Korean service will be based on soul, Washington and London is just one of twelve new b. b. c. language outlets been funded by nearly four hundred million dollars from the British government, it will broadcast AIG, Eilidh.

  • Thirty minute radio programme and provide digital material that can be downloaded and shared a services aimed at audiences in both North and South Korea and commune speakers across the world, but seems directed primarily at the North, where government censorship restrict people's access to independent use Michael Bristow, the German Chancellor Angela Merkel has said that her party will not lurch to the right, as she tries to Win back the voters who deserted her for the anti immigrant a chef de partie in Sunday's election, but missus Merkel said she would try to regain the trust of a large number of people who she said had felt excluded the electoral success of the far right A.F. de left missus Merkel's party, the C.D.U., without an obvious coalition partner, she said she wanted to form a stable government deer, then I, this does cause police openness of work made Steph tippy, of course, we'll speak to the free Democrats and the Greens, but I want to add, also to the social Democrats, it's important that Germany will have a good and stable government.

  • I heard what the s. p. d. said yesterday, but nevertheless, I think we should be talking, and that sentiment is shared by the Executive Committee.

  • As far as the A.F. de voters are concerned, our aim is to win them back with good politics with solving problems, the F.T. all having their own problems.

  • The party's co chair Frogger pet tree announced she would not sit in Parliament, you should buy time, if I don't have gotten an anarchic party, as we have seen in the last weeks can be successful as an opposition, but it cannot offer the electorate are credible proposition as a possible government, and this is the reason that has led me, after much thought to decide not to be part of the A.F. de group in Parliament, one of The these leaders, Alice, Phidel expressed her anger at the moon, he said to me, the French just poppy interview had been me McNeil and he can go on, and I would have liked that missus petrol head, at least, personally, talk to me, or to Mister Garland that hasn't happened in the past few months, and I can only underscore the part of being a leader is showing reliable behaviour.

  • We owe that to our members.

  • Our correspondent in Berlin, Damien McGuinness explain the reasons behind the divisions within the a. f. t., you can define A.F. de as two major factions within the party, on the one hand, you've got the pragmatic side of the party, led by frog, a pet who you heard in that earlier clip.

  • She wants a pragmatic approach to power, essentially, she wants to tone down the nationalist rhetoric.

  • She wants to make the party more respectable, because she's aiming to in her eyes, hopefully, joining a government coalition in the next elections.

  • The other faction within the F.T. is more nationalistic, and they're not afraid to use tough language when they, when they talk about Muslims when they talk about migrants when they talk about all sorts of minorities and of that side of the party has the upper hand.

  • At the moment, we've heard over the last few days, that one reason many people voted for the F.T. was in protest at Germany's handling of Europe's migration crisis, the refugee crisis.

  • That issue is, is something which, not just the O.F.T., but many parties in Germany are grappling with how to tackle, aren't they.

  • Yeah, that's right, because, as you know, over the past two years, we saw one and a half million asylum seekers come to Germany.

  • What's happened since then, really, is that German bureaucracy as cope actually rather well and mainstream society has taken that on board.

  • Now, the big question is how to integrate those new arrivals.

  • There are lots of questions about that.

  • It's a logistical challenge.

  • It also has to be said that mainstream society does support missus Merkel's idea that Germany has a humanitarian responsibility to take in legitimate refugees, given that support them.

  • Will it be fairly straightforward for Angela Merkel to form the coalition government that she needs to, or is it going to be a tricky process or the problem for her is that she's going to have to try and bring together for different parties, her own party, the centre right, see to you.

  • Her sister party more conservative Bavarian party, and then also the free market.

  • Liberals at one end of the spectrum, at the other end of the political spectrum, the green party.

  • These four parties have very different ideas, when it comes to migration, for example, when it comes to asylum laws.

  • When it comes to the economy, and certainly when it comes the eurozone.

  • So I think the difficulty is going to be during the next Few weeks, and possibly the next few months to come up with an agenda and policies which all four parties can agree on Damien McGuinness in Berlin, a judge in new York has sentenced the former U.S. Congressman Anthony Wiener to twenty one months in prison for sending sexually explicit messages to a teenage girl in twenty sixteen the scandal played a role in the presidential election.

  • As you may remember, because his wife works for Hillary Clinton from new York, he's Neda Tawfiq, if any, winners lawyers told the judge, he had acted out of the depths of an uncontrolled sickness, it was now being treated, the former U.S. Congressman hope to get probation rather than time in prison, and cried when his sentence was announced, this is a spectacular fall for her once rising political star who will forever be remembered for affecting the outcome of the twenty sixteen presidential election, police, who seized his laptop found emails from missus Clinton, prompting an investigation into her use of a private emails, you're listening to global news, the most important stories and the best interviews, an on the spot.

  • Reporting from the B.B.C. world service every weekend, you can hear a review of the week's main new stories and why they matter that's in the world.

  • This week, and the programme is also available to download from our website.

  • B.B.C. dot co dot U.K. slash programmes now does a convicted killer deserve a second chance.

  • What about if they Were a child when they committed murder in the United States over two thousand people were given mandatory life without parole sentences.

  • When they were under eighteen, but a decision in twenty sixteen by the U.S Supreme Court means these prisoners now have the right to a new sentence, and the chance to be free.

  • Again, the b. bee sees Elizabeth Davies has been spending time with one juvenile lifer, he was convicted of murder in nineteen eighty five after he took part in a robbery that went wrong.

  • In January, he got the news, he'd been waiting for for decades, but when you've grown up in prison.

  • How do you adjust to a world that's moved on, without thirty two years ago, Norman Bryant was sent to prison for murder.

  • He was told at the time that he'd be behind bars for the rest of his life.

  • He was fifty years old when I first spoke to him, this spring, he just found out, he was being granted parole at a free call from, and he made it very now he was just waiting to hear when he finally get to go home with the right here.

  • Up to suite, it's exciting just to head it up at all be also always you be anxiety you their participation just deal really only just look at it like right now, I'm better than all right, you're such a look, he eventually got that chance in early.

  • Do you want sleep, They're afraid with a sauce, where you know all this time, you've been Norman's mother, who raised him on her own died while he was in prison, but incredibly about four years ago, he was reunited with his father, who you haven't seen since he was a toddler, and his parents separated ever since.

  • Norman has been in constant contact with his father and step mum Joanne trying to make up for lost time.

  • Osama giant do we have our can you bring him young lives.

  • Gong.

  • The next day, I went to meet Norman, for the first time, fortified by Joanne's fried chicken and his first night of sleep outside her cell in over thirty years, I was seventeen.

  • He's a huge guy towering over everyone else in the small House, and it's very easy to see how he played so much basketball in prison, he has a beard and Doric forehead mark of a devout Muslim and that morning, he was wearing black Nike trainers, they were so shiny and pristine, it was clear, they were brand new Joanne told me, Oh, she was making fried chicken for ears.

  • I was more excited just being here with in the evening, you know, I actually ate a plea F.A. brown Ali say made by enough, and it was just the family, it was good.

  • I have a hair, no fried chicken in.

  • I mean, after all that.

  • I mean, sounds like a long day, a long evening, what time, So I'm going to see, I think, I wanna sleep probably while Clark, one very chatty I want to check before becoming as mad as all the rest was already goddess is because I want to learn it.

  • All these features and play with a woman has of course been imprisoned since before mobile phones, even existed, but he seemed genuinely excited about getting to grips with the smartphone.

  • His friend gave to him during all the time I spent with him, it never stopped buzzing with messages.

  • When I was a kid, I didn't know, so it's an incredibly hot July day in Philadelphia, and I've come down, there's no one enter the area where he grew up in the South West of the city.

  • We're standing in front of what almost looks like a park, a sort of raised long, thin grassy area with a few skinny trees and some sets of concrete steps leading to know back before Norman went to prison, one of those sets of steps lead up to his House for the four nineteen floors, as it is, there's a tree, there represents where I grew up, have been on a pair of to go to cowards may have been a pair set out to do was for us, the visions that I head for myself in my firm, there was staying in a hood.

  • We were there was his being a, lifer in the hood, if you're talking about anything that you did It in the prison.

  • Instead of calling it a prison.

  • You great a high value and residential facility.

  • Imagine trying to find work when you've never written a job application, and when the only jobs you've ever done had been in a prison, and then imagine how you tell a potential employer that you were locked up for decades for murder.

  • The centre for employment opportunities and Philadelphia is working with juvenile lifers, including Norman to try to teach them.

  • How do you do just that, a thirty second pitch as what you say in the beginning of the interview, it's basically a sales pitch for yourself.

  • The conviction, seeing it as a little bit more difficult, because this is where you have to talk about the biggest mistake you ever made, or the worst decision of your life.

  • You and show you, I meet some incisions in the pears, I was convicted of murder.

  • As a result, I was, of course, go my incarceration skills and soling pressing for mate in my ball.

  • This will establish my own business.

  • One day in the help from making the same, same that report by Elizabeth Davies, and you can hear more of Norman story, and those of others like him in the documentary life after life, it's part of the B.B.C.'s life story season.

  • Just search for b. b. c. life stories to find the whole collection, as we record this podcast Ballets are being counted after an independence referendum in Iraq's Kurdistan region, the pole went ahead despite fierce objections from the central government in Baghdad, which described it as illegal, the referendum was also condemned by Turkey and Iran, both worry, it'll Stoke separatist feeling among their own Kurdish minority as voting ended a curfew was imposed on the city of Kirk cook, which is divided between curds and other ethnic groups, the bee bee sees Tom Bateman is in a built the regional capital.

  • Eighty eight kilometres North of Kirk.

  • Kirk and Paul Henley asked him what the atmosphere.

  • There was like we were one of the biggest polling stations in this city.

  • Throughout the morning, and I mean hundreds of people turning up that it was notable how people were coming as families, they were children clutching the Kurdish flag and parents coming in dress that is normally reserved for weddings and Festival said this was a real occasion, at least, the people in this city.

  • And remember, this is the regional capital of Iraqi Kurdistan.

  • And so I think the mood that has matched that throughout the day and into the night, has been one of celebration here, and the mood.

  • When you talk to people has been one about trying to fulfil that national aspiration that they thought this was their best chance in generations to aspire to an independent Kurdistan.

  • But this vote has been deeply contentious, the government in Baghdad has fiercely opposed it throughout, it has put pressure throughout for it to Be cancelled, as has the international Community who have wanted this per stoned feeling that it is the all time that it distracts from the fight against so called Islamic state.

  • And then you have the regional neighbours in the form of Turkey and Iran, you have those sizeable Kurdish Community take place, they see it as illegitimate and as the voters happened.

  • Those countries that they will not respect the result is this big sense of celebration and presumably a big turnout likely to turn into bigger disappointment when people realise that the vote might not have any effect.

  • This is, of course, the key issue, because throughout this the Kurdistan regional President, a massive buzz Arnie has made it clear that there wouldn't be any sort of sudden declaration of independence.

  • After this vote, it's a non binding vote, and that he would seek independence, if that was to be sauce through negotiations in a democratic way.

  • And yet we have seen from Baghdad or growing rhetoric about their belief at the illegitimacy of this vote in the face of that we've had an announcement from the Iraqi military that they will hold joint manoeuvres joint drills with the Turkish military on the board.

  • Now, it's hard to gauge the precise significance of that in what has been very heated rhetoric, but I think the key point now is about the politics, between Baghdad and bill when it comes to their fate of the people of that official Region of Kurdistan, and then also the way that the international Community continues to view the Kurdish leadership, because what you have here is Mister Barr's Arnie who has now raised the hopes of his people, but he is done so at the expense of much in international support Tom Bateman in Erbil an Egyptian woman once thought to be the world's heaviest, he's died in the United Arab Emirates, the case of Emma Ahmed had Hattie you'd weighed five hundred kilos attracted international attention, as she travelled to India, and then to the U.A.E. for medical treatment for Hannah Dollard reports in February this year, especially modified ear bus carried the half ton woman from Egypt to India for surgery at the time imaan Ahmed a bit arty had not left her home in more than two decades.

  • Her family said she had been born weighing five kilograms and diagnosed with elephantitis causing her body parts to swell the Indian team disagreed with this diagnosis and claimed she had a rave thyroid condition in Mumbai.

  • Doctor said, they're healthy mum, who's one hundred kilograms before she underwent a stomach shrinking bypass specialist were pleased with the surgery and claimed in total.

  • Iman had shed more than two hundred and fifty kilograms.

  • She is seventy five bus and beg go, then what she was she would never walk, because she has deformed legs.

  • She has lost a tremendous amount of weed, but her family fell out with the Indian expert, We can't be twice your promise me, she won't she's not, O.K., her sister disputed her progress and treatment, the door everything they gain fame money hang on one more Iman din travel double Derby, where dozens of doctors cared for her, she celebrated her thirty seventh birthday.

  • Last month, with a family and doctors by her side.

  • It's thought the Alexandria native one day hope to be healthy enough to visit the beach again more surgery had been planned for later this year, but on Friday her condition deteriorated Iman Abid Lartigue died in hospital in Apple Derby of multiple organ failure.

  • Now scientists say the amount of places suitable for giant pandas to live is shrinking.

  • Chinese and U.S. researchers say the forests, where they live, are in worse shape than in nineteen ninety eight, when they were first listed as endangered.

  • More details on this from Helen breaks the news last year that the giant Panda had been taken off the endangered list made headlines around the world, wild Panda numbers were finally recovering after years of decline, but the pandas still vulnerable to extinction.

  • With destruction of forests, seen as its biggest threat in the new studies.

  • Scientists use satellite imagery to assess changes in suitable Panda habitat.

  • Over the last four decades, Professor Stuart payments Duke University says the forests, where the Panda lives have been divided into ever smaller fragments by road settlements and logging.

  • What's new in this study is a Bh ability To assess the status of the giant Panda by using remote sensing satellite imagery, and then use that information to come up with recommendations how better to money this iconic threatened species, about one thousand eight hundred giant pandas left in the wild.

  • Researchers say its future rests on expanding nature reserves and protecting what habitat remains Helen Briggs, that's all from us.

  • For now, but an updated version of the global news podcast will be available for you to download.

  • Later, if you want to comment on this podcast all the topics we cover.

  • You can send us an email.

  • The address is global podcast at B.B.C. dot co dot U.K. I'm Jonathan Blake until the next time.