Angela Merkel Curtis Merkel Washington Jilly Washington Ronald Reagan Professor General Noriega Burger President Gorbachev President Emmanuel Mac Paul Moss Paul Nelson Mandela Mix Lord King John Jean Luc Jean Everything, Ok Ella Curtis Curtis Comrade Kim Jong Chancellor Merkel Arnie Iran North Korea Iran Germany Zambia United States Us France Kurdistan York Paris Europe America Us Sweden South Korea London Japan Turkey The Middle East Tehran Mexico Goodwin Austria Ali Hamad West Germany West Berlin Washington Schofield Pyongyang Mustafa Munich Monaco Merkel Cdu Marcia Manco Lou Kurdistan Region Kansai Fitzpatrick England East Berlin Dresden Dionne Deutschland Costa Rica China Bolton Baghdad Aachen

Newshour 2017-09-23:21:00.00
Full Text | View extractive summary

  • Hello and welcome to news from the B.B.C. world service coming to you live from London, I'm Julian Marshall in a moment.

  • More insults directed at President trump as North Korea defends its right to have nuclear weapons at the United Nations, and later in the programme, the flight of hundreds of refugees from the democratic Republic into Zambia escaping a military offensive, while in France labour reforms are met with opposition on the streets of Paris, then the President just slice of square. is a real sense of resignation.

  • I feel powerless.

  • I want to tell them, but they're not powerless.

  • Because there are a lot of us, and it's really worth talking to your neighbours reading thinking and being informed, because what's happening today in France is a catastrophe.

  • I never thought I'd see it in my lifetime.

  • That's all to come.

  • In this edition of the news, but we begin with North Korea and a show of military force by the United States, American bomber planes or scalded by fighter jets flying over international waters.

  • He stop North Korea and escalating already sky high tensions between the two countries, while on the ground, North Korea's foreign Minister was calling President trump a megalomaniac and defending his country's right to have nuclear weapons.

  • In his speech to the U.N. general Assembly, let's cross to new York and the B.B.C.'s written a shower and the speech written, Ella and Mix of justification threat and insult absolutely after the war of words, Julian, that's raged this week between North Korea and the U.S., there was a certain amount of anticipation about what might be in this speech today bear in mind Yong Ho is an experienced diplomat, he said to be articulate and well connected, but in today's speech to the U.N., he certainly let rip, I was in the hall, and my re was speaking, and he spoke for longer than be a lot at fifteen minutes.

  • He's been pretty calmly, not in that made a dramatic style of that news reader.

  • We often hear declaring North Korean news people sweating profusely.

  • I have to say, and he started by saying that, given the President trump had used violent words in his speech at the U.N., but my said he was going to respond at a similar tone, and he certainly lived up to his own billing.

  • What followed was a tirade of, threats and insults, perhaps the most chilling moment came when mystery said that Donald trump had made the visit of what he called, our rockets to the entire U.S. mainland inevitable by calling the North Korean leader King John own rocket man, and he went on to say that, Mister trump was mentally deranged and full of megalomania.

  • And he said, the U.S. President would pay dearly for his speech in which he said, of course, that he totally destroyed, North Korea, if the U.S. was Forced to defend itself or its allies taz, how longer with Adam.

  • I mean, then you will be none other than trump himself is on a suicide mission in case innocent lives are harmed because of this suicide attack trump will be held totally responsible, the respected Supreme leader of the d. p. o. k. comrade Kim Jong own stated as a man, representing the d. p. o. k. and on behalf of the dignity and the honour of my state, the people, and my own, I will make the man holding the prerogative of Supreme command in the U.S paid dearly for his speech, calling for the total destruction of the d. p. o. k. might not be aware what he uttered from his mouth, but we will make sure he bears consequences far beyond his words, far beyond the scope of what he can handle, even if he is ready to do so.

  • And it wasn't just the U.S that came in for a bashing all of America's allies were in North Korea's sites with South Korea and Japan, dubbed as U.S. stooges.

  • And the North Korean.

  • Foreign Minister kept stressing that was vital for North Korea to have nuclear weapons in self defence, and it was a point that he made over and over again, and he was pretty Defiant in the face of the new, tougher sanctions, which you may remember, were imposed by the U.N. security Council following North Korea's last nuclear test at the beginning of this month, and they were tightened again this week by the U.S now mystery repeated that the restrictions wouldn't make the country stop its nuclear development somewhere not Goodwin and woody through such a prolonged and arduous struggle.

  • Now we are finally, only a few steps away from the final gate of completion of the state's nuclear force, it is only a forlorn hope to consider any chance that the deeply k. would be shaken and in a change its course, due to the harshest sanctions by the hostile forces and be in there was quite an odd moment when mystery was almost poetic describing North Korea's testing of intercontinental missiles, and, of course, this is this testing that's got everybody so jittery, but he talked about them flying over the blue sky and the tremendous explosion that had been recorded on the planet.

  • Who, though, was, do you think his speech directed because, from what I could see the the Chamber was pretty empty.

  • What's it was, we got full her, actually, I have to say, I've been sitting there for some time, and more people definitely came in for this speech, but it is the end of what was a very long week here at the U.N., and it is interesting that his speech came towards the end of that week, you can't help wondering whether there was a reason why he was moved from Friday to Saturday, when there were far fewer people around, I Don't know, I have no proof of that of why that might have happened, but it, but it is interesting, I think your speech was definitely aimed at the global audience.

  • He talked about the United States, he mention, South Korea and Japan, he kept talking about the United States allies.

  • This was a speech for everybody out there who from North Korea's point of view, has lined up rain themselves against North Korea and their nuclear project.

  • And, of course, today, you have seen this show of strength from the United States, they America, hasn't felt that it could simply sit back and let this speech happen, the Pentagon said that U.S. bombers Lou close to North Korea's East coast, and they were essentially demonstrating in the Pentagon, pretty much said this in a statement, the military options that are available to them to defeat any threat they felt they had to be seen to be doing something, and I think they're in their statement, the Pentagon went on, they wanted to underscore the seriousness with which the U.S. takes North Korea's reckless behaviour and grave threat written are many thanks.

  • That was the B.B.C.'s written a Shire in new York.

  • Well, North Korea was shaken earlier today by tremors sand, it big North Korea, the speculation, was that it might be the result of another underground nuclear tests, the tremors certainly took place, close to the site of the test.

  • Earlier this month, but experts are divided as To whether they were caused by an explosion, or whether it was indeed a natural earthquake.

  • Let's speak to the scene as bow, head of the comprehensive nuclear test ban Treaty organisation, the c. t. b. t. in Austria and my, though, what's your assessment of what happened today in North Korea, Julian the lost chord, e., and reason is, he's not a Mac to use reason syce machli so any event that upland draws our attention.

  • So this morning we recorder toy event, one at four forty three you, T.C., and another one at eight twenty nine, so the one eyed four forty c. was much smaller under one at e. twenty nine, which is similar to the second event detector.

  • After the main plus on Sept.

  • Cert, so these were what you might describe as after tremors, as a result of that earlier nuclear test, yeah, they often look after prom as what we call after shocks come immediately odd slightly later have men.

  • Plus, this time, we're talking about weeks later, but it could have been, but at the men, plus the Nicola tests.

  • I'm not us, I'm said, September could have just distress chilled in the region and have caused some geological structure to become active, and that could be the course request any better Corsican softer men plus, that's what we seem to be Dylan.

  • We've been term of the physics that the signal that's ruined us with with the North Koreans have been aware Of this sort of the geological consequences of what they are doing by conducting underground nuclear tests.

  • I think this case was quite unprecedented Intel moffett's magnet spirit, and we talked about our goats in many followed Newell's, and we talk about a magnitude that is over six body with money at that estimate to be unprecedented in term of underground nuclear test detective sort by international monitoring Cisco so Assizes at this kind of Monger toot made across some geological stress, and stress that will be that will induce possible, more than one in the surrounding a geological structure and of North Korea would be aware of that, because we have expert as well, but more saw what I wanted to add these this, there's why precisely, we need answering to force of this Treaty.

  • In that event, would have alongside to specs, and that would give better case, and often more than one inder grant before the tests and after the tests, and that's what we're missing today.

  • Yes, I was going to mention that, given that you are head of the comprehensive nuclear test ban Treaty, every time there is one of these North Korean nuclear tests, you must be very disturbed.

  • Indeed, we are disturbed disturbed, not only by the fact that we, you know, I'd hope that Tess would be off history, but also not disturbed by the fact that we longing for about into force of this Treaty and us, while we Hawk a Business remains the last wake up call to the international Community to work towards doctor into force off three Treaty and eight remaining countries would certification is needed.

  • So, if we have that there would be no more tests, no more warriors in recording and peninsula, and nor stress at all for the international Community, we getting into a Peter that was quite stressful to all of us, not only doors were work tirelessly buttered all international Community, because in the discussions that we here between North Korea, all the discussions evolve in the United States and North Korea, and indeed, China, Japan, and South Korea.

  • We very rarely hear about your nuclear test ban Treaty.

  • Why is that.

  • That's it's a million dollar question.

  • I'm just, I've just landed this morning from new York we habit.

  • Article fourteen cough once they'd saw quad confidence to broad answering to force of the Treaty, but it could be that some of the main actors, but if you go silly still pending, and I think it's a difficult, it's difficult when your doorstep is not clean.

  • When you ask others to keep yours.

  • So, but that's something that we have to work on.

  • I were working closely with all the countries to get there.

  • I mean that if you kiss ification process for doctoring to force of the Treaty, but it is told that is deterring that people this connects these shocked accordion peninsula from answering to force of the comprehensive test It.

  • Do you find it disturbing the way things seem to be progressing on the Korean peninsula.

  • At the moment, absolutely, I think it is disturbing, because we face seeing it high tension periods where what I've said, is that a words seem to go beyond our thoughts, and that's in petered off this in in time, like that one has to be pretty careful, we have to reduce the tension try and work together towards finding the solution in the quad em pronounce led the best way possible and into into soft international Community, and that means a dampening down of the rhetoric, one would think so, my many thanks.

  • That was the scene as a bow, head of the comprehensive nuclear test ban Treaty organisation, the c. t. b. t. in Austria and earlier, we heard from my colleague written a shark at the U.N. general Assembly in new York coming up, we cross to Berlin, on the eve of the German elections and hear from the Turkish Community bear, they Dorsey Merkel as mother figure almost in the sense life has changed, you've been given a second chance.

  • They think that they would be feared for with this, a level of gratitude towards food, but still to come.

  • The latest headlines, though, from the b. b. c. news from United States airforce bombers and fighter jets have flown over international waters, East of North Korea.

  • Shortly after North Korea's foreign Minister defiantly told the United Nations That sanctions would not force his country to change its nuclear policy and Mexico has been struck by another strong earthquake at the third in less than three weeks.

  • This is Julian Marcia with news, a live from the B.B.C. in London, a delegation from Iraqi Kurdistan in Baghdad to discuss Monday's independence referendum insisting that, despite objections from the government, it will go ahead, the Kurds, a long history of strife tha's meant they've been scattered around the world, you'll find a Kurdish population since cities everywhere with the rocky Curtis done fast developing a new and relatively prosperous identity, many among the diaspora have now returned to Kurdistan region, some of them had never seen, or at least couldn't remember, and they become active participants in the campaign for Kurdish independence as Paul Moss reports now from the erect Iraqi Kurdish capital that would be sitting in the Costa Rica cafe.

  • He really could be anywhere in the world.

  • It's an international star coffee shop with its cappuccinos frappuccino e's and an impressive selection of patisserie.

  • But this is ere Beale Iraqi Kurdistan, and this cafe really embodies for locals.

  • What has been an attempt to create a modern thriving city out of what was, until only a decade ago, a fairly run down.

  • Place the locals themselves describe as an overgrown village, and I'm here with three Kurdish people who all grew up in Europe, but all decided to come back here and help build what they See as a new Kurdish nation.

  • My name or throw them or stuff we left code son, when I was ten years old, and I've been in London, I never wanted to come back to curd a son, in the beginning, and then I found almost like a calling, I started helping with the orphanage, and I also saw the potential for change how we, those who live abroad, how we can influence our society for the better.

  • My name is, these are Barry's, though, I lived for most of my life in Sweden.

  • My family went there as political refugees.

  • When I was only to almost every day we would sit down around the table, and my family would tell me stories about the bravery of my grandfather, who fought for Kurdish rates.

  • I always thought I'd come back to Kurdistan.

  • So, Monaco, you were ten when you left Curtis dancer, it was a place you knew the then moved also to Sweden.

  • Did you always think you come back here, yes, I did, especially because I left without my without my parents was always on my mind.

  • Well, owls living there.

  • A suite in a safer, but I always felt like Curtis Curtis animals, not as developed, there were some cultural challengers, they will want me to wear a Kurdish dress, sometimes I listen, sometimes I didn't way to Mustafa, well, you need sort of being told you can't mean men, and you can't talk to them in Public cafe is that I don't like that, that is, those from my family, I realise other families were quite open minded, but that's the only thing I dislike, but then here, it's, it's a different sense, this sort of like in here.

  • I don't have a refugee statis, I'm not British Kurdish, and I'm just Kurdish, he's a buzzer.

  • At first, when I came back to Curtis, and I just wanted to bring back with me.

  • Everything that I had the privilege to learn in Sweden and apply it here.

  • Award torn country, the people my age, had never been asked, why do you think the way they think just to have discussions, just bring two people together to try to solve issues, I think people who learn something from abroad have made great impact, to an extent, because head, you've been here two thousand five are greatly differs from now, we are speaking at a crucial time for Iraqi Kurdistan, on Monday, you will hold a referendum on whether to break away and become independent.

  • All the signs are that Iraqi Kurdistan will vote for independence.

  • How much is that affect your dream of a building this new nation that you came back here, for I have gone through a horrible times as a child, when I was three years old, I went to jail for six months, just because my father became a push America and twenty two off for his closes her relatives were executed.

  • I Believe that Curtis will be a more peaceful place and going through the violent childhoods pieces are very important for me, I always lived with the dream of an independent could have stamped, this is what I came back for just to be part of working for it gives me a thrill I truly hope that this region wool witness independence, they deserve it.

  • That report from the b. c. missus Paul Mar sin Iraqi Kurdistan and now tour largely abler conflict in the democratic Republic of Congo, that is driving hundreds of refugees into Zambia thousands, thousands of people rather have been killed and more than a million forced to flee their homes in the deer sees Eastern coast ci region.

  • Since the start of an insurrection nearly a year ago by a tribal militia, which is demanding the withdrawal of the military, could be has been defending the actions of his armed forces at the U.N. general Assembly in new York saying that they're fighting what he called terrorists, the United Nations says, as many as five hundred people a day are fleeing to Zambia, because of increased violence in the democratic Republic of Congo, and they're telling a very different story from the President, as I heard from p. arena Lara, the United Nations high Commissioner for refugees, Chief representative in Sam.

  • Sorry, there are seeking sanctuary.

  • Because of the same reason, they are being looters some after my being killed, others have been raped their Houses have been burned.

  • So do you are looking for a safe haven.

  • That is why they don't mind walking long distances to cross into neighbouring Zambia, because it would seem that there's been an intensification of military activity, but not one, it depends, some of them claimed that occasionally, the military activities have intensified over the past two days, seeing dad.

  • It is rather sporadic.

  • So, is it possible to put a total on the number of refugees who have arrived.

  • Already in Zambia from Gran from January to the end of July, we received altogether over a two thousand five hundred people, they are crossing, on average, one hundred a day.

  • Today, for instance, the total number of people who crossed is over two hundred, but the figures keep fluctuating and are you able to cope.

  • They're in Zambia.

  • With this influx look on that ramp, I have to contest had Zambia, was not prepared to receive these refugees.

  • When the emergency started, we mobilised their armed forces and all resources to cope with the situation, but they need support, they need sizeable support, because these refugees.

  • They need food they need water and sanitation, and they need everything.

  • Currently, the government of Zambia has allocated land to horse them.

  • They also have a locator trucks for their transportation.

  • So dear being supportive and, presumably, the United Nations would like an end to whatever it is that's happening inside the day.

  • Ah, see that is causing these people To flee at the United Nations is of d. if you had that the international Community should mobilised to bring back piece that the see if the odds.

  • He's a stabilised are few trees will he stop crossing into a neighbouring countries, and presumably a part of that stabilisation include Sir a halt to the government offensive en Casa, yes, there should be a linkage, because all the refugees when they're interviewed, they say, unless presidential relinquish as the power, they are not willing to go back to d.

  • I see, this is a dilemma, because we're present, we don't know he's his agenda, and they don't want to comment on that, but obviously, if he does not to relinquish power, where these Fugees will not go back home.

  • So there is a belief that the only way the conflict in side can be resolved is President cabbie lower leaves power.

  • That's what did a few trees, I saying the conflict in Kansai is one packet of to conflict, those who are crossing into Zambia, they are coming mainly from two provinces, which are a close talker sigh.

  • So it seems as if the fighting has spilled over from cos ci into neighbouring provinces.

  • Yes, there was a period at a lower of the unmade see are in Zambia, have caused those were her words, and because of the poor quality of the telephone line.

  • Stay with us for a new Tsar a lot more to come.

  • You're listening to A podcast edition of news available twice each day, straight after the live edition of the programme.

  • And if you're enjoying this, then, you know, you can take a look at other podcast from the B.B.C. world service, you could download witness, for example, which is remarkable stories first hand accounts from important moments in history, or for a round up of the very best news on the B.B.C. world service, try a global news podcast tens of thousands of supporters of the French for left politician Jean Luc aminal straw had marched through the streets of Paris to demonstrate against President Emmanuel Mac was labour reforms my Sean's France, some bowed parties, says the changes signed into law on Friday and an attack on workers' rights is lot an off onwards, the decrees may have been signs, but they're not law until they've come back before Parliament, so the struggles only just virginity fickle mossy there's in a slice of fire. is a real sense of resignation.

  • I feel powerless.

  • I want to tell them that they're not powerless.

  • Because there are a lot of us, and it's really worth talking to your neighbours reading thinking and being informed, because what's happening today in France is a catastrophe.

  • I never thought I'd see it in my lifetime, the views of some of the protesters on the streets of Paris to, so what aspects of these labour reforms to they object to the businesses who Schofield is in Paris objection Is general to this, the reform of the labour code, which they see every inspired entirely by kind of Thatcherite liberal economic ideas, for example, they do not like the way that, from now on, smaller companies with, say, between twenty and fifty employees will be able to that, but the owners will be able to negotiate directly with the workforce, without going via a Union that there is now going to be a ceiling on the amount of money, which is paid to workers who were laid off.

  • If a labour Court says that they've been wrongly dismissed, there will be a ceiling on the money they can get.

  • If there are loads of small elements in this labour code reform, which have been far too detailed to go into, but the overall effect of which is to make it easier for employers to come through their own arrangement with with their workers, and thus to fire, the more easily and food higher, the more easily, but for the left of the far left.

  • It is all complete surrender and a backward step overturning all the years of social progress that they say that the workforce was made over the last decade for them, it's portrayal of what France found four, they're going to continue to object, a baby by coming out onto the streets because there's new labour code is law, or are they going to tried to obstruct its implementation of a political demonstration today, as opposed To the Union demonstrations, which will happen before the other point.

  • Remember, as I think that, you know, even if they don't say it, I think, they all, no, that it's too late to stop the labour, the labour code is in law.

  • It's been promulgated, there is no question, really, I don't think even they would think it's possible for this to be to be rolled back.

  • It's going to happen, but what they're doing, unions, for their part, and Jean had Welsh over his part is looking ahead, because they know very well, but after the labour code reform come raft of other reforms which were also in the mackerel manifesto, which have been the come which to do are to do with the reorganising pensions, which will do with reorganising workplace training, which I do reorganise unemployment benefit all ideas which are metal spelter perky claim his manifesto, which do you go in the direction of shaking up their traditional way of doing things.

  • In France, and what the unions are micron both want to do is to lay down a market.

  • So, you know, we are going to, we are going to turn out or mast to stop them and they haven't stopped this, but they feel that they can stop what follows his scaffold in Paris, you lassoed the news from the b. b. c.

  • I'm Julian Marshall, and let's cross now to use as Iqbal, on the eve of the German elections.

  • I'm sitting High above her Reza plaits overlooking the imposing Brandenburg gate, the eighteenth century neo classical monument in Berlin, it is one of the best known monuments in the country, and the site of many significant episodes in Germany's history.

  • Back in nineteen eighty seven, the President of the United States, Ronald Reagan came here, he address the population of then West Berlin appeal to President Gorbachev, then the President of the Soviet Union to tear down the Berlin wall, and once the wall did come down.

  • The official ceremony of the reunification of Germany was held here in nineteen and just walking distance from the gate, I can see the Reichstag building fabulous glass dome of it re designed and constructed by the British architect Lord.

  • That's why we're here to talk about the people who will sit in that building after the election, who will shape its place in Europe and the world for the next four, we are in the last hours of campaigning now campaign dominated by two broad issues, social inequality and immigration.

  • Chancellor Merkel is in a commanding position, she made her last big rally speech last night in Munich, and she was heckled and boo throughout people calling out lies when she said that the numbers of migrants.

  • You're allowed into Germany back in twenty fifteen more than a million would never happen again.

  • And it's this issue that has strengthened the rhetoric of the populist right wing A.F. de party with their anti Islam anti immigration message, they may well have a significant presence in the Bund starbug after Sunday her main opponent Martin shorts of the S.P.D. has also held his last rally in Aachen in West Germany, near his home town, and he appealed to those undecided voters.

  • Now a reminder, Angela Merkel came to power in two thousand five, there is a generation of young people who have only, no, as the leader, my colleague, James nottie has been exploring why so many young people are supporting all over Berlin in the shadows of a twenty first century cityscape.

  • The history of the last century, is laid bare checkpoint Charlie was one of the best border crossings between East and West.

  • Visitors still search for some traces of the Fuhrer bunker, a few steps from the Brandenburg gate here, where I'm looking over towards the Boulevard of unter den Linden into East Berlin, which for a generation lay on the other side of the wall for Germans beyond Middle age, the memories are sharp and dark for the young, it's the stuff of school books, the millennial and looking forward.

  • My name is Max, and I am twenty assault, I'm gonna Michael Chancellor of my generation, and I'm really proud, she's a strong leader in a country, and it's remarkable how many of them are going to vote for Angela Merkel centre right C.D.U. and somebody he and his fellow students can't remember another Chancellor, they look at the coming Economic and social challenges in a chaotic world and talk about progress and stability in the same breath.

  • A lot of people who I know my age, they don't know anything but Manco in government, they were too young to understand politics before Macca voting against her for someone new is quite unrealistic Antonia a first time voter at eighteen, he's probably gonna vote, green, hoping that they might be part of a coalition, but she has no doubt, but she wants the incumbent, as Chancellor, I really don't like Surete, I also think that with Tramp.

  • It's safer and away to have someone who knows the system and knows the country and who we know can deal with trump us, you've been undermined by the undermines that's one half of Thackeray's, I'll tell Adama coats.

  • Why Martin shoots of the central f. e. s. p. d. has found this campaign.

  • So difficult his party's been in the so called, Grand coalition with Angela Merkel another's since twenty thirteen, and it's been very hard for him to carve out his own territory.

  • Here's an extraordinary fact from the poster Peter mma to check when we look at the first time voters on some of these boulders aged under thirty, they're voting behaviour is quite similar to that of the whole electorate.

  • So we had to not really see much variation and would us very striking is that, especially among the young, borders, aged eighteen to twenty one backing of Angela Merkel us even stronger then among the whole electorate in how many other countries in Europe.

  • Could you see youth unemployment.

  • Here is the lowest on the continent, and that certainly helps, but there is something else.

  • The politics of the street with the rise of the far right here, that's a piggy the movement demonstration in Dresden, the alternative for Deutschland will win federal seats for the first time on Sunday, if you speak of the German spirit of nationalism, using language that was for Bolton for decades and which the young, don't want to hear.

  • That's a past, they've heard about, and they want to forget.

  • Number two, check points out that being conventional is as much about rejecting the far right as about supporting mother Merkel sixty three Chancellor for twelve years, who has plenty enemies as well as devotees, although the criticism is often couched in either a leftist critics definite will risk with his band prototype.

  • We've got a song, and it's called a, Marco, and it's about the populism in Germany, which just giving Merc or ever blame for what happens, like the refugees come to Germany thinking America and their Internet site, which makes jokes about it and try to shove the thank you mark it down some jokes, so it's like, Oh, I broke my leg.

  • Thank you, my friend stuff like this, and we've wrote a song about it.

  • Just try to make her live at fun of this well back At the Nelson Mandela international school, they're hoping for different kinds of coalitions that many green voters here among the young.

  • That was one overwhelming choice for leader, both done really convince me through much, but I guess if I had a truce.

  • I would also go for Marco come out claimants runs the youth wing of the Merkel C.D.U. party, he argues that young Germans of this generation, a different, there's couldn't a change in attitudes of young people in Germany, in the society, we see a growing number of people talking more about values, in a way, it's become called be conservative in our centre and away in Germany and the other, the more pragmatic.

  • Take your life into your own hands.

  • In other words, many Germans are seeing themselves in these last hours before voting at the still point in a turning world where for their parents and grandparents.

  • It was so often the other way.

  • The f. d. on the right, as Professor general Noriega Burger of the free University here, explains have come together and started to rise to try to disturb that feeling.

  • If do you would be the first party after a party, we heard from nineteen forty nine to nineteen fifty three, the Parliament, his successor party of the German Nazi party.

  • It's a party with people were not interested in talking about the problems that had to be solved.

  • They'll talk about issues less in common with the really problems of The dumb society.

  • So, in this city of dark memories for many boaters.

  • The most anxious moment on Sunday, is when they will see their total vote for the A.F. de France, in the spring, after all eleven million people voted for the national front here, it will be much smaller, but if the figure were to reach, say, ten per cent, it would bring a noticeable presence into the blender stag there behind me of a group that simply couldn't have used a nationalist rhetoric, a generation ago, because it was still unacceptable, and that was James knotty looking at young voters to other B.B.C. colleagues have been talking to different migrant among the oldest migrant group here in Germany are the Turks, they've been longstanding hostility between President air daoine of Turkey and anger Eileen of the b. b. c.

  • Turkish service has travelled to some of the places where Turkish communities live, but first to the newest arrivals those predominantly from the Middle East, the ones who came in twenty fifteen and swelled the population of this country by more than one my mood Ali Hamad is from the B.B.C.'s Arabic service, he's been telling me what they think about Angela Merkel three Merkel of mother figure almost in the sense life has changed, you've been given a second chance.

  • They think that they would be safer with her, although she actually said, at some point, what happened in two thousand fifteen will never happen again.

  • This a bit of gratitude towards beach that is really interesting, I've in the Turkish Community in Germany, is among the oldest in terms of Migron population, the one has asked these people not to vote for the enemy.

  • What was your finding did did people feel that they were going to listen to the President of Turkey, or were they going to listen to the campaigning taking place in the country.

  • They've made, they're still move connected to choke you with their hearts, my colleague said, there'd be a refugee see Michael as a modern figures or the sea and one as a father figure, so they're really to follow up.

  • I'd like you both to tell me what impact the rise of the populace right wing, f. d. has had these groups of people, because clearly they're kind of anti Islam anti immigration message has made an impact on the bigger political discourse to what extent Eileen has it made an impact on the Turkish, we can say that I was interviewing this Turkish, I'll tickle party eagle has just established last year by Turkish immigrants, they are racing for the first time for a federal elections and Beth was one off main reasons to formed at a party, but still, runny talked a Turkish comedy, too, they're not really concerned about the rise of fifty because they believed German systems to protect my Gran's in that sense, they want to go to extremes.

  • They say that Everything, O.K.. would it could could be very different.

  • If they have a significant presence.

  • Obviously, what about you.

  • I mean that there was a real backlash in the immediate aftermath of what was alleged to have taken place in Cologne, where recently arrived migrants were accused of sexually assaulting women in the city of to what extent have have those people who came in twenty fifteen seen the coal face the kind of anti Islam anti immigration rests interesting thing is that many of them, but we're both going to come were tried to majority of the German population, and there would be all with England, they have no doubt the Fugees here, and the people and the Middle East to watch, because it's a system that is very different to what we have back home.

  • Oh, them.

  • This is a novel, you know, to see people go in and actually voting in those notes, you could put it ordering an election, really, that's what you get the studio, all the time, they are learning the model of democracy, able to protect the vulnerable, um able to protect those who are in need.

  • And if you look, this is it's odd to be the only, and they are afraid this will change, there would be records.

  • They know that, you know, they are did this sector that is easy to pick on wherever they go.

  • They're going to be picked on, they'd rather be picked on in Germany, rather Than, and that was my mood Ali Hamad of the Arabic service.

  • I was speaking to Eileen from the Turkish service.

  • That's it from me, Iqbal, I will be back, though, tomorrow, Sunday when the polls closed.

  • Seventeen hundred, for a special programme from Berlin, the exit polls will have been published, and we'll talk about who looks set to bleed this country, he's as resurrect Bell land, as she says she'll be reporting live from Germany, throughout the day.

  • Tomorrow, and particularly on the late edition of new Tsar had twenty hours, as the polls close, they might have our top story, this hour United States airforce bombers and fighter jets have flown over international waters, East of North Korea.

  • Shortly afterwards, North Korea's foreign Minister defiantly told the United Nations that sanctions would not force has country to change its nuclear policy somewhere not Goodwin, and would equal through such a pro prolonged and arduous struggle.

  • Now we are finally, only a few steps away from the final gate of completion of the state's nuclear force, it is only a forlorn hope to consider any chance that the deeply a k. would be shaken and in a change its course, due to the harshest sanctions by the hostile forces or of the headlines as a Mexico has been struck by another strong earthquake, the third in less than three weeks, and tens of thousands of people have held a rally in Paris against President microns reforms To French labels.

  • This is Julian Marshall good news from the B.B.C. world service now an act of defiance from Iran, any days after President trump lambasted the country at the U.N. general Assembly Iranian state T.V. are shown the launch of the new medium range cuirm Shah ballistic missile the missile has a range of two thousand kilometres and was unveiled on Friday, had a military parade in Tehran, which President said that Iran would not ask any countries permission to strengthen its missile capabilities in as U.N. speech Mister trump as spoken of the need to stop what he called a murderous regime building dangerous missiles and called the nuclear deal with a rather than embarrassment to the United States sat exhibit Columba's Professor of politics or Tehran University, can we take it that the missile test was a riposte to the trump speech.

  • What aspects of the speech, would the Iranian government have taken exception to do you think that that could hardly have come as a surprise to the Iranian government, but prison Roo Hani at the U.N. general Assembly gave as good as he got he described President trump as a rogue newcomer to international politics.

  • Send condemned his ignorant and absurd and hateful remarks.

  • Why, therefore, than need also to test a ballistic missile that could easily be viewed as as quite provocative President trump dead also those speak of the need to stop Iran developing it its missile programme so very specifically There a request to Iran to stop doing what it just has done, but Iran says that it has the right to a missile programme for defensive purposes, make alarm, Professor of politics at Tehran University.

  • So, President trump is now fully engaged in two nuclear confrontations one with Iran over its missile programme and a nuclear accord he finds an embarrassment and the other with North Korea, where many are now asking whether the exchange of increasingly bellicose rhetoric between Washington and Pyongyang could be the precursor to open conflict does this latest test by Iran represent an advance in the country's missile programme mark Fitzpatrick is a non proliferation expert at the think tank, the international Institute for strategic studies in Washington Jilly.

  • And I think it is an advanced this Missal may have been tested back in January at a shorter distance, it's said to have a two thousand clamour to range, that's the same basically the same range, some other muscles, North Korea tested several years ago, but dismissal based on the engine may actually have a longer range two thousand possibly up to three thousand foreign ourselves about the engine is correct, which would pay put which countries within reach.

  • Three thousand actually doesn't do anything new.

  • For Iran in a two thousand brings into its range, three thousand brings portions of Europe, but why Iran would need to threaten Europe, it would be needlessly provocative to have a longer range Missal, unless, as Part of a development programme to get something into continental there could reach the United States, but that's pretty far from Iran's capabilities.

  • Today, and could .is clarify with you, there's nothing illegal about what Iran has just done, but it does breach made with the spirit of the nuclear deal.

  • It's not even legal it breaches the spirit of the un resolution that his partner to the nuclear deal.

  • Then U.N. resolution cos Arnie Iran to stop Missal testing testing missiles, they're inherently designed to be capable of carrying nuclear weapons, and certainly falls into that category.

  • Nuclear deal itself is strictly limited to the nuclear deal.

  • But this U.N. resolution.

  • It's seen as part of a package to the nuclear Dionne, that's why the trumpet ministrations may say that it's a violation you heard a commentator in Tehran, expressing their view that this was probably a riposte to President trump speech at the U.N. general Assembly would you concur with that.

  • Or do you feel that Iran is to tell me to go ahead with this missile programme, whatever.

  • Oh, I certainly confer the timing is very definitely every parts to President trumps belligerent speech, just as North Korea's next testing will be a, Repast at that Iran unveiled this Missal raid after the speech.

  • It has been in development for some time.

  • As I said, it it, it was probably tested in January, it was first spoken about a year ago, so it's been part of their Development programme, but Iran's muscle development designed a much slower pace, then, North Korea's, and therefore the testing of the miso, I'm assuredly the timing has a political element to it.

  • In response to the speech that was a mark that Patrick or non proliferation expert of the think tank, the international Institute for strategic studies in Washington, and that's it.

  • From this edition of news from me.