Angela Merkel Fitz Patrick Merkel Martin Julian Marshall Ian Brennan Curtis Wayne Berit Rosier Julian Ronald Reagan Professor General Noriega Burger President Gorbachev Patrick Stewart Pacific Patrick Oliver Dominguez Norman Nelson Mandela My Patrick Lord Norman Lisa Suliman Lisa Solomon Kota Son Jill Johnston Johnston James Baldwin Ezra James Baldwin James Henry Miller Greg Kate Francis Fitzgerald Dean Martin Curtis Curtis Bazaar Arnie Arnie Iran Amy Bell China North Korea Iran Germany Europe Kurdistan Catalonia Washington United States London Barcelona America Tehran Sweden Zambia York Vietnam Pyongyang Madrid Islam Catalan Africa West Germany West Berlin Wanda Vienna Twa Stratford On Avon Spain Shani Saigon Rwanda Papi Othello Mustafa Munich Monaco Merkel Cdu Manco Korea Jilly Israel Iraq Havana Hanoi Guinea Gandhi France Fitzpatrick England East Berlin Dresden Dionne Deutschland Desdemona Costa Rica Burundi Bolton Avon Aachen

Newshour 2017-09-23:13:00.00
Full Text | View extractive summary

  • Welcome to news from the B.B.C. world service coming to you live from London, I'm Julian Marshall in a moment.

  • Iran successfully tests a new ballistic missile, we have the latest from Tehran and Washington also coming up in the programme ahead of Monday's disputed referendum in quite a stun, we'll hear what to driving the move for independence, I have gone through a horrible times as a child, when I was three years old, I went to jail for six months, just because my father became a push America and twenty two off for his closes the relatives were executed.

  • I believe that Curtis will be a more peaceful place and going through the violent childhoods.

  • Peace is very important for me, that's all to come.

  • In this edition of news that we were again with an act of defiance by Orion only days after President trump lambasted the country at the U.N. general Assembly Iranian state t. v. is shown the launch of the new medium range, a quorum sharp ballistic missile the missile has a range of two thousand kilometres, um, was unveiled on Friday at a military parade in Tehran, and which President said that Iran would not ask any countries permission to strengthen its minute missile capabilities in his U.N. speech Mister trump had spoken of the need to stop what he called a murderous regime building dangerous missiles and called the nuclear deal with Iran and embarrassment to the United States, said eczema collam is Professor of politics at Tehran University, can we take it that the missile test was a riposte to the trump speech.

  • What aspects of the speech, would the Iranian government have taken exception to do you think that dad could hardly have come as a surprise to the Iranian government, but at the U.N. general Assembly gave as good as he got he described President trump as a rogue newcomer to international politics.

  • Send condemned his ignorant and absurd and hateful remarks.

  • Why, therefore, than need also to test a ballistic missile that could easily be viewed as as quite provocative President trump dead also those speak of the need to stop Iran developing it its missile programme so very specifically, a request to Iran to stop doing what it just has done, but Iran says that it has the right to a missile programme for defensive purposes.

  • That was a sad death civic alarm, Professor of politics at Tehran University.

  • So, President trump is now for engaged in two new Claire confrontations one with Arana Brits missile programme and a nuclear record, he finds an embarrassment in the other with North Korea, where many are now asking whether the exchange of increasingly bellicose rhetoric or between Washington and Pyongyang could be the precursor to open conflict marked Fitz Patrick as a non proliferation expert at the think tank, the international Institute for strategic studies in Washington, and My Patrick this missile that Iran has just tested does it represent an advance and its missile programme.

  • Yes, er Jilly.

  • And I think it is an advanced this Missal may have been tested back in January at a shorter distance, it's said to have a two thousand clamour to range, that's the same basically the same range, some other muscles, North Korea tested several years ago, but dismissal based on the engine may actually have a longer range two thousand possibly up to three thousand foreign ourselves about the engine is correct, which would pay put which countries within reach.

  • Three thousand actually doesn't do anything new.

  • For Iran, two thousand brings Israel and into its range, three thousand brings portions of Europe, but why Iran would need to threaten Europe, it would be needlessly provocative to have a longer range Missal and less and less as part of a development programme to get something into continental there could reach the United States, but that's pretty far from Iran's capabilities.

  • Today, and could I just clarify with you, there's nothing illegal about what Iran has just done, but it does breach made with the spirit of the nuclear deal.

  • Well, it's certainly first order.

  • It's not even legal it breaches the spirit of the un resolution that his partner to the nuclear deal.

  • Then U.N. resolution cos Arnie Iran stop whistle testing testing missiles, they're inherently designed to be capable of carrying nuclear weapons, and this certainly falls into That category.

  • Nuclear deal itself is strictly limited to the nuclear deal.

  • But this U.N. resolution is seen as part of a package to the nuclear Dionne, that's why the trumpet ministrations may say that it's a violation you heard a commentator in Tehran, expressing their view that this was probably a riposte to President trump speech at the U.N. general Assembly would you concur with that.

  • Or do you feel that Iran is determined to go ahead with this missile programme, whatever.

  • Oh, I certainly confer the timing is very definitely every parts to President trumps belligerent speech, just as North Korea's next testing will be a re pasta that Iran unveiled this Missal raid after the speech, it has been in development for some Prime, as I said, it it, it was probably tested in January, it was first spoken about a year ago, so it's been part of their development programme, but Iran's muscle development designed a much slower pace, then, North Korea's, and therefore the testing of the miso, I'm assuredly the timing has a political element to it.

  • In response to the speech and Pacific Patrick him if I could turn briefly to North Korea seismologists have detected tremors in North Korea, but disagree as to whether this is a smaller earthquake or ramp, perhaps a human made explosion.

  • Do you have a view.

  • Well, my initial assumption was that it was another nuclear test in response to the President's speech back the latest word From the c. t. b. t. o. organisation in Vienna, which is the organisation set up to prevent and then monitor nuclear testing is saying that it probably was an earthquake.

  • Another actually to tremors, which is further indicative of it being an earthquake earthquake probably had something to do with North Korea's previous nuclear test created a lot of seismic disturbance underground my Fitzpatrick, many thanks mark Fitz Patrick or non proliferation expert at the think tank at the international Institute for strategic studies in Washington, for the moment, the world is relying in economic sanctions to pressure North Korea to change its ways, and a significant move today from China, which North Korea regards as an ally China has announced an end to imports of textiles from North Korea and the gradual halt of oil exports, in line with the sanctions approved by the U.N. security Council eleven days ago, Sinn Lee at the B.B.C.'s Chinese services with me in the studio and what impact will this have on the North Korean economy, he will have a lot of impact on the economy, because North Korea totally rely on the oil supply from China and also rely on the export of coal, oil and natural gas to China for you to economy.

  • Now that China has cut off big majority of fit oil supply.

  • So that means China is stepping up his pleasure in North Korea to stop its weapon.

  • Hooray development programme.

  • China is only doing what He'd signed up to do at the U.N. security Council with these sanctions, but it has become more willing over the recent months to apply economic pressure to North Korea.

  • Why is that.

  • Because, actually, China has been fearing about North Korea's nuclear programme.

  • From the start, and don't forget, it was the former Soviet Union, which helped North Korea to a set up its nuclear facilities and the facilities.

  • They are testing grounds was only fourteen kilometres away from the Chinese border.

  • So whatever kind of nuclear disaster happened singles, Korea, China will be the biggest victim, but it seems to be only recently that China has started to express those kinds of fears openly and only recently, indeed, that we're starting to have a lot of rhetoric from Pyongyang directed at China itself.

  • Of course, China doesn't like those high pep Elise, but China steel rigg asked North Korea assets ally, because China doesn't want her sudden collapse of the North career routine, which may lead to a huge influx of refugees to China, all the American troops station at the Chinese North Korean border is China.

  • Do you think um more inclined now to join with the United States in trying to find a diplomatic solution.

  • Is it rather worried.

  • Now my Fanny about North Korea, but also about President trump, and what might be his intention, China has been there for a long time.

  • Here, because, on the one hand, it doesn't want North Korea to Develop his nuclear programme which can threaten its, although they lack economic development.

  • On the other hand, it doesn't want to see the collapse of thin North Korea regime.

  • So now, China has been negotiating with America, with their Tum and a mystery.

  • Send for a long time.

  • How to solve it diplomatically.

  • So steel, China, although with all these economic sanctions, China, the peaceful soft mind that the problem Shani of the bee was his Chinese service.

  • Many thanks coming up the devolved government in the Spanish region of Catalonia are still committed to holding an independence referendum, despite the Spanish authorities seizing voting materials and arresting Catalan officials.

  • There's protester in Barcelona, says the Madrid government has refused to discuss the issue, we have to the tall, they say, no, we can look as big about it.

  • So, if we have arrived.

  • The spine is because they don't have any honour there, it is headlines from the b. b. c. news from Iran as test fired a medium range ballistic missile or days after being criticised by President trump for its missile programme.

  • China is banning the import of textiles from North Korea, in line with the latest U.N. sanctions, it's oil exports to the North will also be cut you're listening to the B.B.C. world service, this is news with me.

  • Julian Marshall, a delegation from the Kurdish regional government sit in Iraq is travelling to Baghdad amidst mounting pressure for her to postpone a referendum on Kurdish independence on Monday and advisor to the Kurdish leader massive Bazaar Arnie said, the referendum would be discussed in talks with a central government, but he insisted that it would go ahead as planned, the U.N. security Council, as also warned of a potentially de de stabilising impact of the referendum, but the Kurds long history of strife has meant that they've been scattered around the world, you'll find Kurdish populations and cities everywhere, but with Iraqi Kurdistan fast developing a new and relatively prosperous identity, many among the diaspora have now returned to a region, some of them have never seen, or at least can't remember, and they've become active participants in the campaign for Kurdish independence has poor Marts reports now from the Iraqi Kurdish capital to be sitting in the Costa Rica cafe.

  • He really could be anywhere in the world.

  • It's an international star coffee shop with its cappuccinos frappuccino e's and an impressive selection of patisserie.

  • But this is ere Beale Iraqi Kurdistan, and this cafe really embodies for locals.

  • What has been an attempt to create a modern thriving city out of what was, until only a decade ago, a fairly run down.

  • Place the locals themselves describe as an overgrown village, and I'm here with three Kurdish people who all grew up in Europe, but all decided to come back here and help build what they see as a new Kurdish nation.

  • My name or throw them or stuff we left, Kota Son, when I was ten years old, and I've been in London, I never wanted to come back to curd a son, in the beginning, and then I found almost like a calling, I started helping with the orphanage, and I also saw the potential for change how we, those who live abroad, how we can influence our society for the better.

  • My name is, these are Barry's, though, I lived for most of my life in Sweden.

  • My family went there as political refugees.

  • When I was only to almost every day we would sit down around the table, and my family would tell me stories about the bravery of my grandfather, who fought for Kurdish right.

  • I always thought I'd come back to Kurdistan.

  • So, Monaco, you were ten when you left Kurdistan, to, it was a place you knew the then moved also to Sweden.

  • Did you always think you come back here, yes, I did, especially because I left without my parents was always on my mind.

  • Well, owls living there.

  • A Swede in a safe or a Swede in as mods ever, a lot, but I always felt like Curtis Curtis animals, not as developed this region, there were some cultural challengers, they will want me to wear a Kurdish dress, sometimes I listen, sometimes I didn't way to Mustafa well need sort of being told you can't mean men, and you can't talk to them in public cafe is that I don't like that, That is, those from my family, I realise other families were quite open minded, but that's the only thing I dislike that then here, it's, it's a different sense, this sort of like in here.

  • I don't have a refugee statis, I'm not British Kurdish in the, I'm just Kurdish, he's a buzzer.

  • At first, when I came back to could I just wanted to bring back with me.

  • Everything that I had the privilege to learn in Sweden and apply it here.

  • Award torn country, the people my age, had never been asked, why do you think the way they think just to have discussions, just bring two people together to try to solve issues, I think people who learn something from abroad have made great impact, to an extent, because head, you've been here, two thousand five are greatly differs from now, we are speaking at a crucial time for Iraqi Kurdistan, on Monday, you will hold a referendum on whether to break away and become independent.

  • All the signs are that Iraqi Kurdistan will vote for independence.

  • How much is that affect your dream of a building this new nation that you came back here, for I have, through a horrible times as a child, when I was to be years old, I went to jail for six months, just because my father became a push America and twenty two off for his closes her relatives were executed.

  • I believe that Curtis will be a more peaceful Place and going through the violent childhoods.

  • Peace is very important for me, I always lived with the dream of an independent could stamp.

  • This is what I came back for just to be part of working for it gives me a thrill I truly hope that this region wool witness independence, they deserve it and that report by the B.B.C.'s poor Mar sin Iraqi could a stun coppices and corsets doublets the Pope's hats, not the sort of items you'd find at any old jumble sale, but there to be had are plenty at a costume wardrobe clear up by the Royal Shakespeare company, some ten thousand items are on sale today at the R.A. assise home in Stratford on Avon in central England, they've been used in theatre productions going back twenty years, and they have to go, because the companies running out of space.

  • I spoke earlier to Amy Bell's r. he press Officer in the thick of the sale, so would be most popular with shoppers.

  • I think everybody likes a little bit of everything we've had a lot of amateur groups come up, we've had an amateur I spoke to earlier, and they were looking, particularly for some doublets and hoses.

  • I've also spoken to some people from re enactment societies, looking for armour and people who just a gentleman's of it.

  • Looking for something a bit different and a bit interesting and a little bit of a c. history.

  • Other queues for the Cod pieces.

  • I think they could fit in there in high commands, along with a bum rolls as well at the cos, you know, everyone was really wanting was there some very fetching pink or costumes, but all went really quickly.

  • Early on, the people at the very front of the queue were queuing from five P.M. yesterday, cos they desperately wanted those pig costumes, and I think they nabbed all three of those stone, so there's a lot of random bits as well, and I got a copy says, but you mentioned in passing bum roll what I was a bum roll is what a Lady would wear, that's to ensure that the sketch it was properly puffed out, people like those because it kind of is a good way, making sure your skirt is appropriately puffed out now, all these items are listed are they in terms of the theatrical productions in which they were used, and maybe the actors who use them.

  • Yeah, so inside and nearly every single costume.

  • There's a small and R.S.C. label in that, obviously, label it housed the actor who wore them the character they played and the production in which wore that costume, so you can really know, though, what you're buying is a piece of art.

  • As the history, so the moment, I'm just looking at this.

  • Is this a small cars going, I'm looking at now, which is from mouse and his child, and was worn by an actress Called Naomi shaldon she played the seal in that production, and on the other red here, I can see, there's a beautiful silver dress, which was worn by Joanna Vanda hand when she played Desdemona in Othello.

  • So you can really see where these costumes kind started out their lives, everything's pretty affordable starting in a bloke what roughly a dollar in the kind of been wow schnell currency unions national Connie currency.

  • You're looking at stars, a Donna or fifty pence and the most expensive item, I can see where I'm standing at this very point, it's twenty Pounds.

  • I think our most expensive item was around about fifty Pounds, which is in one of the other had been with a beautiful long cloak cos often the fabrics and souse he's so gorgeous that a lot of people are buying items where they can take the fabric and use them for something else.

  • What about to you tempted, Oh, very kind.

  • It is, I've seen a very nice lion's tail, that I'm quite tempted by for yourself.

  • Yes, Sir, won't you doesn't want a lion's tail mean there's Halloween coming up, that would be brilliant, and there's some lovely hats some brilliant hats that you could definitely have you fancy dress box as well, so you're happy to empty the wardrobe and up.

  • What are you going to do with the proceeds, so it's a great thing is that every when you purchase his items today that money's going To go towards a costume workshop development Fund, we launch a public fundraising campaign called stitching time so veteran Shakespearean actor, Sir Patrick Stewart is one of our main supporters a stitch stitching time costume workshop appeal and that money will help us to redevelop and renovate a very old custom workshops, which means that the making of costumes can continue instruct funny Avon and we can pass on those skills to younger generations as well.

  • For many, many years to come.

  • Was any Belsen press Officer for the Royal Shakespeare company on their giant costume wardrobe sail with us here on, he was a lot more to come.

  • Coming up next will be live in Berlin, ahead of tomorrow's general election that first uncertainty rains of the Spanish region of Catalonia, whether devolved government are still committed to holding a referendum on independence.

  • On October, the first, there's been a concerted effort by the chat Spanish authorities to stop the vote from going ahead, a Catalan officials have been arrested voting materials seeds, Catalonia has its own police force, but a large number of Spanish officers are on board too huge ships docked in the port of the regional capital, Barcelona and reinforcements from Madrid are apparently on their way.

  • Tom burridge reports protests had become the norm here in Barcelona, head of a referendum on independence, which Catalonia's devolved government wants to hold in just over a week's time, this one outside a Court insider cattle and officials Arrested by Spanish place earlier in the week, they're accused of helping to organise the referendum, we are only one at the wall wizard.

  • Go ahead, even though all the bricks that he's doing a lot of people have been protesting in Catalonia, listen.

  • A lot of people, maybe even a majority of the population.

  • Here, don't want independence from Spain, where there are claiming is for democracy will have the right before that we will see, we have the tall, they say, no, we can't there was big about it.

  • So, if we have arrived.

  • The spine is because they don't have any honour solution.

  • My name is, but do you the most.

  • I'm fifty seven, and I am a teacher.

  • Is it really legitimate.

  • How did to hold a referendum in the current chaos, which is happening.

  • They want his or her friend them forever.

  • You can say, yes, you can say no, the Spanish authorities are not going to let you hold his referendum are, they don't want you were Guinea pigs.

  • That's like wait, they're all going all these repression.

  • They don't want to see us boat.

  • Why away from the protest.

  • Many people here in Catalonia.

  • Take a more nuanced approach on the independence question, and whether there should be a referendum at all, for example, muddy Thiele Pini, Aye.

  • When I say you're doing the Ben, then they say yes to a friend.

  • No, but add fifteen to one for all that's Catalan, and I speak Catalan within my mum's from the mainland, the spin in the here and there's a lot of people like me with that filth and back.

  • That's Oliver Dominguez, most of us want to vote, but not like this, I really have the note what I would vote.

  • I almost have vote.

  • Now, the referendum is against the remoteness, it's a trap.

  • And then there are some, like Professor fed em brunette actively working to prevent any referendum from taking place on the Gandhi, I lowered by a Spanish bar, a referendum is affecting the silver.

  • Indeed, in the silvering is in the hands of the space.

  • Karl for the authorities in Madrid.

  • It is a difficult dance, you Spanish police to prevent the vote, and risk antagonising cattle and protesters further for several years, the Spanish government is told, Catalonia's devolved administration, it cannot all the referendum this long standoff has now reached a critical point, top Lawrence with that report from Barcelona, you're listening to the B.B.C. world service, a mezza crostata news as Razia Iqbal, on the eve of the German elections Rosier Julian, thank you.

  • I am sitting high above Perry's or plaits overlooking the imposing Brandenburg gate, the eighteenth century neo classical monuments here in Berlin.

  • It's one of the best known monuments in the country.

  • And, of course, the site of many significant episodes in Germany's history.

  • Back in nineteen eighty seven your remember the President of the United States, Ronald Reagan Came here, and he address the population of then West Berlin and appealed to President Gorbachev and the Soviet Union to tear down the Berlin wall.

  • Once the war did come down.

  • The official ceremony of the reunification of Germany was held here.

  • Early in October.

  • Nineteen ninety and just walking distance from the gate, I can see the Reichstag building the fabulous glass dome re designed and constructed by the British architect, Lord Norman foster, and it's why we're here to talk about the people who will sit in that building after Sunday's election, who will shape, Germany, its place in Europe and the world for the next four years.

  • It is, as you say, Julie, in the last day of campaigning or campaign dominated by two broad issues, social inequality and immigration Chancellor angler Merkel have the C.D.U. is in a commanding position, she made her last big rally speech last night in Munich, she was heckled and boo to pretty much people calling out lies when she said, the numbers of migrants, she had allowed to come into Germany back in twenty fifteen more than one million will never happen again.

  • And this issue has strengthened the rhetoric of the right wing anti Islam anti immigration party, the A.F. de who may well have a significant presence in the Parliament, she defended her policy on immigration, though, and said that the C.D.U. was the only party that could guarantee a stable, I say, we cannot spare a Single vote, we need every vote, so that we can continue to live well and feel good.

  • In Germany, the social Democrats had never said, they will not do a red red, green coalition.

  • That means they're not excluding that, and that means that Germany would be looking at an uncertain future.

  • We can't be doing with experiments, we need stability and security.

  • So I ask you to give both your votes to the C.D. you for a strong Union for a strong, Germany, the successful Germany for a Germany, in which we live.

  • Well, and feel good in the woods.

  • The words of Angela Merkel, and she referred, of course, to her main opponent Martin shorts of the s. p. d., he has held his last rally today in Aachen in West Germany, near his home town speedy's appeal has been up to the undecided voters, telling them that they can still make an impression on the outcome of the election, and they're by denying Angela Merkel her fourth consecutive Chancellor, she came to power back in two thousand five, and there is a generation of young people who have only known her as the leader of their country.

  • My colleague James nottie has been exploring why so many young people support all over Berlin in the shadows of a twenty first century city scape, the history of the last century, is laid beer checkpoint Charlie was one of the best things between East and West.

  • Visitors still search For some traces of the Fuhrer bunker, a few steps from the Brandenburg gate here, where I'm looking over towards the Boulevard of unter den Linden into East Berlin, which for a generation lay on the other side of the wall for Germans beyond Middle age, the memories are sharp and dark for the young, it's the stuff of school books, the millennial and looking forward.

  • My name is Max, and I am twenty years old, I'm gonna Michael Chancellor of my generation, and I'm really proud, she's a strong leader in a country, and it's remarkable how many of them are going to vote for Angela Merkel centre right C.D.U. and somebody he and his fellow students can't remember another Chancellor, they look at the coming economic and social challenges in a chaotic world and talk about progress and stability in the same breath.

  • A lot of people who I know my age, they don't know anything but Manco in government, they were too young to understand politics before Macca voting against her for someone new is quite unrealistic Antonia a first time voter at eighteen, he's probably gonna vote, green, hoping that they might be part of a coalition, but she has no doubt, but she wants the incumbent, as Chancellor they really don't like Surete, I also think that with Tramp.

  • It's safer and away to have someone who knows the system and knows the country and who we know can deal with trump us, you've been Undermined Zambia, Puddy undermines that's a fact.

  • That is a terrible cuts.

  • Why Martin shoots of the central f. e. s. p. d. has found this campaign.

  • So difficult his party's been in the so called, Grand coalition with Angela Merkel another's since twenty thirteen, and it's been very hard for him to carve out his own territory.

  • Here's an extraordinary fact from the poster Peter mma to check when we look at the first time voters also the aged under thirty, they're voting behaviour is quite similar to that of the whole electorate.

  • So we do not really see much variation and would us very striking is that, especially among the young, borders, aged eighteen to twenty one backing of angular workless even stronger then among the whole electorate in how many other countries in Europe.

  • Could you see youth unemployment.

  • Here is the lowest on the continent, and that certainly helps, but there is something else.

  • The politics of the street with the rise of the far right here, that's a piggy de movement demonstration in Dresden, the alternative for Deutschland will win federal seats for the first time on Sunday, if you speak of the German spirit of nationalism, using language that was for Bolton for decades and which the young, don't want to hear.

  • That's a past, they've heard about, and they want to forget Peter my two checkpoints.

  • That being conventional is as much about rejecting the far right as about supporting mother Merkel sixty Three Chancellor for twelve years, who has plenty enemies as well as devotees, although the criticism is often couched in either a leftist critics definite will risk with his band prototype.

  • We've got a song, and it's called, dank Marco, and it's about the populism in Germany, which just giving Merc or ever blame for what happens, like the refugees come to Germany thinking America and their Internet site, which makes jokes about it and try to shove the thank you mark it down with some jokes, so it's like, Oh, I broke my leg.

  • Thank you, my stuff like this, and we wrote a song about it.

  • Just try to make her live, but fun of it.

  • Well, back at the Nelson Mandela international school, they're hoping for different kinds of coalitions that many green voters here among the young.

  • That was one overwhelming choice for leader, both done really convince me through much, but I guess if I had a truce.

  • I would also go for Marco come out claimants runs the youth wing of the Merkel C.D.U. party, he argues that young Germans of this generation, a different, there's couldn't a change in the attitudes of young people in Germany, in the society, we see a growing number of people talking more about values, in a way, it's become called be conservative in our centre and away in Germany, in the other, the more pragmatic.

  • Take your life into your own hands.

  • In other words, many Germans Are seeing themselves in these last hours before voting at the still point in a turning world where, for their parents and grandparents.

  • It was so often the other way, f. d. on the right, as Professor general Noriega Burger of the free University here explained have come together and started to rise to try to disturb that feeling.

  • If do you would be the first party after a party, we had from nineteen forty nine to nineteen fifty three, the Parliament, his successor party of the German Nazi party.

  • It's a party with people were not interested in talking about the problems that had to be solved.

  • They all talk about less in common with the really province of the dumb society.

  • So, in this city of dark memories for many voters, the most anxious moment on Sunday, is when they will see their total vote for the A.F. de France, in the spring, after all eleven million people voted for the national front here, it will be much smaller, but if the figure were to reach, say, ten per cent, it would bring a noticeable presence into the blender stag there behind me of a group that simply couldn't have used a nationalist rhetoric, a generation ago, because it was still unacceptable patriotism here has long been a difficult one Berlin feels young, it's a city that doesn't sleep, and everything's on the move, but, especially among young voters that is more optimism, maybe less feeling Of being adrift of uncertainty and government that in many European capitals.

  • Think of London, it's inescapable that, though, the euro crisis, isn't far behind them, and the unrest over migration is real, and often toxic.

  • This is an election with an ingredient that many voters elsewhere, haven't known in recent times, confidence, the insurgents in this election, haven't yet invaded the centre ground.

  • Maybe the feeling of continuity will turn out to be a loser, but for now, it's everywhere, Jane's knotty reporting were joining me here, overlooking the Brandenburg gate is a pollster from in for tests de map rhinehart welcome to news, our, what are your latest polls telling you, this is angler Michael still in a commanding position definitely, you know, we have eighty eight per cent.

  • My own personal financial situation would be as good as this year, or even better.

  • Next, right.

  • So that's what they're thinking about their thinking about their pockets.

  • On the economy, definitely, but I think it's a head, it's a haven of stability, they look around in Europe, little Club in the world.

  • What about the issue of immigration, which has really seen at the rhetoric of the right wing in the kind of really have some traction, it's about eighty percent will be eighty you were.

  • This was a vote for the cubicle for you want to give us.

  • I'm going to see the refugees in there, a country and issuing drum me, really, for the first right Wing rotas and protests, and to people who are thinking, the undecided because, in the, in the end, the s. p.

  • Dean Martin short's is really appealing to them, are they, the people who are going to make the difference.

  • Possibly no hope, no ripple never dies.

  • If you have forty percent undecided.

  • We don't have a turnover of one hundred you get seventy five percent, you know, the number of undies, he comes through the undecided and graft sure is and the significance of the possibility of actually a big presence of the right wing party in the rice, it's possible.

  • I do think it will be attributed Papi.

  • Some time ago, I said, no, the election campaign here in Germany, I've been really down Yuki's question boat, we're from Islam.

  • And, of course, we help these London in this incidents right before rhinehart poster for in protest do, Matt.

  • Thank you very much for joining us here live overlooking the Brandenburg gate in Berlin.

  • Do join me again tomorrow, we will have a special programme on the B.B.C. world service at seventeen hundred hours, where polls close here, we will be seeing the first exit polls, which will give us a very good indication of who is going to be taking power.

  • Here we might have our top story, this hour Iran as test fired a medium range ballistic missile days after being criticised by President trump for its missile programme, I did as a Nuclear proliferation expert mark Fitz Patrick told us that the decision to launch now was no coincidence, the timing is very definitely passed to President trumps belligerent speech.

  • It's said to have a two thousand clamour to, but dismissal based on the engine may actually have a longer range two thousand possibly up to three thousand in far an hour.

  • Since about the engine is correct.

  • In other news, China is banning the import of textiles from North Korea, in line with the latest U.N. sanctions, it's oil exports to the North will also big cut, and the United Nations says, as many as five hundred people a day are fleeing to Zambia, because of increased violence in the democratic Republic of this is Julian Marshall with news from the B.B.C. world service, the village voice epitomised a whole era in new York the Bohemian world of Greenwich village from which it took its name, offering a platform to writers like James Baldwin Ezra pound and Henry Miller, Norman mailer was one of its founders from this week, the newspaper will be available online.

  • Only the end of the new York news stand staple at Lisa Solomon work for the paper from nineteen eighty three until two thousand and four, there are some of her reflections.

  • Do you know what's, like me, who, at the start of the voice and for untold numbers of readers who wants queued up at new stairs to snatch up an early copy.

  • This is The end of an era, the voice brought his unconventional takes to the hyper local for a late night performance art, the city Council corruption to the global sending reporters Tohru Havana in Hanoi Jerusalem Johannesburg.

  • During the sixties Francis Fitzgerald reported for the paper on the Vietnam war from Saigon from inside the world looks exactly as it had appeared in the books, magazines or Newspapers, and yet it is not the same to come to Vietnam is to work through the looking glass of a print into a land beyond the vanishing point solid objects break loose from their lines of perspective sensations collide daily rituals habits of thought collected over a lifetime refract concentration on the war in a state of persistent abnormality one makes periodic checks on oneself, like an airline pilot before take off to see whether responses are motions opinions or in some semblance of working order, the voice won three Pulitzer prizes, more than any other, aren't we probably self described as a writer's paper, the voice, opened the way for radical pros like Jill Johnston Johnston's looping stream of consciousness and Greg Kate's illuminating mash up of high theory in flyboy James Baldwin, like to say artists are here to disturb the peace true that Jimmy true that when those rowdies are really on their game.

  • They also ripped folks out a modelled in the fear of extinction loans them away from their circadian like stepping into the white water roller Rollercoaster rush of myth ritual frenzy becoming Mayor redemptive Angel benches on the loose testing wired nets scream in love lover.

  • Yes, participant observers, we covered social movement black civil rights feminism, Gay liberation pro immigrant into, you know, thus inventing a vivid form of political journalism.

  • There was both rigourous and, we're organised as a labour Union pioneer child care subsidies, the inclusion of free Mercers and same sex partner benefit back in nineteen seventy nine, the late, great Muck raker Wayne Berit profiled the rise of a real estate developer, who was getting ahead by working his family's cash and political connection reported that his subject alter it, we tried the bribe him to be a jeweller Tory and threatened to sue him if he wasn't the subject's name, Donald trump trump's problem, it's not so much what he's done, but how he's done it, I decided at the start that I want to profile him by describing his deals not his lifestyle or personality, I have to getting to know him, I realised that his deals are his life, he once told me, I wanna make a deal, just to make a profit.

  • It has to have flair.

  • Another Manhattan developer said it differently, trump won't do a deal unless there's something extra, a kind of moral larceny, innit.

  • He's not satisfied with the profit, he has to take something more.

  • Otherwise, there's no thrill morning, the demise of the papers print edition may seem a Little like lamenting the loss of the dial a copy of every type has been facing a revenue crisis for years.

  • So, yeah, I'll miss the voice striking covers that have formed part of Newark's visual landscape for decades, but I realise it that really the hunk of newsprint, that we grieve.

  • It's the Defiant sense of justice and of cultural core that rubbed off on readers as surely as the papers print smudge their fingers Lisa Suliman who worked for the village voice from nineteen eighty three until two thousand and four, the batter or people are perhaps better known outside of Africa by the name Pygmy denoting, they're short stature, the nomadic hunter gatherers living in central Africa, but their traditional lifestyle is increasingly under threat from development music producer Ian Brennan has travelled to the remote border region between Rwanda and Burundi to hear, they're back with stories to give voice to their concerns.

  • He's produced an album of songs called, why did we stop growing tall.

  • He's been speaking to the B.B.C. once or twice a week, I'm happy, and like a lot of nomadic people throughout the world.

  • The about Twi increasingly with industrialisation limited in their movements and then driven off the land, which is usually rich resources, minerals, forests and jungles, increasingly, they live and villagers were at their way of life has been disrupted and changed, and they have a very high rates of poverty, there are generally historically and rule One, the about while we're always seen as the music makers, they were the ones that would entertain the King's, historically, they were the ones that still to this day, oftentimes were hired to entertain at weddings.

  • This Rector was made up mostly of non musicians, we did songwriting workshops, the people that had no previous experience in these very remote areas, on the border of brandy and a longer than the other half of the record or people playing traditional music and traditional instrument, the tide or the record comes from a song.

  • Why did we stop growing.

  • There's a lot of questions as to why that is, historically, often the women that were taller ordinary outside the tribe, and apparently that help to perpetuate the fact that the individuals are often diminutive come closer by an individual from the villagers, on the border of broon Wanda, it's abadas ribby as honest men, a scene of a rap song, as you could find one, not that, and I know I don't feed them.

  • Surprisingly, she's talking somewhere positively about the fact that rewind that since the nineteen ninety four genocide, the most recent one of the three that the tribes have come together Warren is by Beatrice mokele Rudy, and she is the oldest person on the album, and she has an older doing more of a traditional song, and it's so more one for in many ways.

  • One is that a bit of a crossroads.

  • There's a stability There, there's burner unification within the country, and there's also wildly increasing opportunities for some of the population, but, unfortunately, that hasn't necessarily change their way of life for the people that are outside the cities and outside the capital.

  • One particular music producer Ian Brennan, and the a back Twa, ending this edition of news, a goodbye.

  • Here's our has been a download from the B.B.C. to discover more and our terms of use with it, b. b. c. dot com slash podcast.