Benazir Bhutto Diana Princess Diana, Princess Princess Diana Michelle Barney John David Davis Bennett Jones Williamson Tony Blair Simon Prince Philip Prime Minister Eduard Philippe President Obama President, Emmanuel President Emmanuel Philip Mohammed Salah Lucy Williamson Kim Jong Kevin Connolly Kevin Connelly John Sutter Jacob Zuma General Zia Emmanuel Andrew Crawford Alex Chamberlin France North Korea Tanzania Paris Britain Russia China Us Uk Pakistan Germany Barcelona Washington Wales United Kingdom San Francisco London United States Tim Franks Moscow Liverpool Europe Dubai Donahue Brussels Wilton Venezuela Us Ria Norway Merkel Lavrov Kay Japan India Ganja Dodi Dodd Custer California Buckingham Palace Beijing Audie Africa

Newshour 2017-08-31:21:00.00
Full Text | View extractive summary

  • Hello and welcome to news from the B.B.C. world service as committed life from London, I'm Tim Franks, in a moment, we'll ask with a force five orders and thirty six measures amount to one great transformation.

  • That's what the French President, as promised, with his changes to labour laws.

  • So was one of the world's major economies, about to be remade also after the latest round of high level talks between Britain and the y. you ever breaks into the negotiations tough, or just plain terrible.

  • After this, we, it is clear that your gate.

  • Doesn't it feel you go to your guy wished to under his obligations.

  • After departure.

  • How can we build trust and start discussing her future, what a change smell the sulphur in about thirty minutes.

  • First, though, what France needs, says it's energetic new President Emmanuel macro is not reform, nor is it me or change rather re says, France needs a transformation.

  • And so, mackerel, it's promising to haul his country far further and far faster into a new world of labour relations and budget balancing, and it has seen for decades, and this in a country, renowned for its large and restive trades unions for a history of strike action and street protests in a moment, we'll ask just how exceptional France's and how radical these changes are first, let's hear about what happened today, when we got detail of those Reforms, he's our Paris correspondent Boosey Williamson come up the video games are from the last generation, the building is almost a century old, but this brand new campus in southern Paris is for France's new President, a vision of the future.

  • So this is the start of someone, so this is a creative zone.

  • That's how we call it, this is where we had three thousand work station, a little bit over three thousand work station under the soaring concrete roof of a former railway Terminus.

  • One of the projects Directors Cedric God our explained.

  • The idea behind station, f. bringing together thousands of hand picked start up entrepreneurs to nudge, France's economy in a new direction, we think about exit is helping was, I think, the President, the new President is really pro start ups.

  • I think that's also helping and ray now would just in a great momentum when there's light going on starter allying tenants are aligned, and I think people internationally, and they have an the first points friend indicated to women engaged in contact sports like ragged aunt Letitia Peugeot has developed a new kind of sports protection for women using technology from motorcycling in the military, compared to just a few years ago, she says, attitudes towards start ups have changed, and the election of President my Crown is helping it's definitely reassuring.

  • It's also a really positive impact.

  • How many people rally towards being really positive start entrepreneurs helps like deed to Die life today's labour reforms will curtail the power of French unions and remove it entirely from firms with less than fifty employees, they will also cat compensation for unfair dismissal and make it easier for companies to adapt working conditions to changes in the economy, bits others Audie, no, no, Prime Minister Eduard Philippe said that the election of President mackerel was a mandate for change was more severe.

  • He put those, no one believes that Francis existing labour laws help create jobs grow company sustainably for small companies and for bosses, the rules, I consider to be a brake on investment is not the first French President to attempt this kind of reform, the last time it was tried a year ago, the response was widespread strikes.

  • Only the hardline c. g. t. e.

  • Union has so far, called for a strike again, but others like didio odds from another Union force of Ria, so the door is still open to strike action if the reforms, don't add up the economy in France is improving.

  • We're not against improving the showing off the economy, but if, in fact, it's only a matter of cutting costs in the working that force and asking people to make you forward to make to tighten their belts.

  • When, at the same time, the economy's improving of Scottish people wouldn't understand what is going on.

  • However, weak, the protests, the gloss is coming off France's new pro business, in the months since His election, there's been a sharp drop in approval among voters, exposing the tensions over these reforms, as President, Emmanuel mackerel wanted to remain aloof above the fray of daily politics, but embodying the wishes of voters from both left and right is becoming harder, as his campaign vision gives way to concrete choices between reforms that, please business and protections that pacify, he's left the beef's, he's Lucy Williamson reporting from Paris.

  • So how important are today's announcements and how exceptional is the world's sixth largest economy, Simon deacon is Director of the centre for business, research at Cambridge University in some ways, a change is not very extensive.

  • What they have said they'll reduce the amount of compensation paid to an employee who is unfairly dismissed, and they've extended the scope for negotiation at, thank you.

  • Price level in small firms employing twenty people they've also made some procedural changes to unfair dismissal claims, which reduce the pyramid, within which you can make a claim for dismissal.

  • They haven't made a major change to the system of labour market that'll collective bargaining, they've retained the principle that agreement sat so called patch level or industry level, as we would say still mostly do you take priority over enterprise chorister bargaining.

  • I want to talk to you about what the effects of those changes.

  • Those relatively small changes as you characterise some might be in just a moment.

  • But, first of all, can I ask you, in a sense, How big France's problems are because France has often been absorbed by word for a sclerotic old fashioned economy.

  • Is that fair.

  • I think it's a peculiar description of an economy where productivity is significantly higher than it is in Britain, and is comparable to Fay, I predicted that in countries like Germany or Japan.

  • So, France has made a choice to focus on employment protection and the implication of that is that when first homework workers.

  • All they have to train them, we had to invest in capital equipment.

  • They have to invest in organisational innovation.

  • So, France is a country where it's quite difficult to get hired, I guess, but also, it's difficult to be dismissed positivity is very high as high level of innovation in the French economy, it is choose a high level of registered unemployment in the French economy, there isn't you Kay, can't you make choices, we opted for a difference.

  • Labour market regime really thirty years ago, when we had to such a government had a Mitchell on government, they much in one direction, U.K. went in the other direction.

  • Today, British policy makers would say, we have a more flexible labour market and the higher employment level, but we have a real problem with productivity.

  • There is no real consensus on z. at the effects of labour laws.

  • It's a highly debated issue within social sciences, but I think the conventional wisdom that tougher labour laws always equate to more sluggish growth Or higher unemployment that just isn't reflected in the in much of the social science, and I goes on.

  • In that case, I just wonder whether we should read too much into what's going on in France.

  • You know whether France's either the exception.

  • Right now, as it's often portrayed within Europe, or whether in fact, as a result of these reforms.

  • If they go through, whether it all sort of suddenly become the Paragon for the rest of the world to copy.

  • I think these reforms are really minor in the bigger picture, essentially below where it's actually the market works.

  • I think some more comfortable puzzles were put forward, find emperors, think tanks, and desert organisations, they haven't really been adopted and the unions, some of them anyway.

  • A lot of parents have days of action.

  • At the moment, or strikes for this, that some are some aren't.

  • So I think them up on governments, trying to steer a sort of Middle way here.

  • I think there's clearly a political imperative to be seen to be doing something about French labour market, partly because of pressure from Germany to do that.

  • So I think the sort of reform.

  • It sounds important is highly political whether these reforms will actually lead to a major change in either French label all there with a face like a market works in this really doubtful, I think, and in terms of the example of the United States.

  • By some measures, still, the world's biggest economy and are famously liberal labour environment.

  • What lessons, if any.

  • Does France have to take from there, O.K.. snow lies a, you do have weak employment laws, but also had a tremendous record of innovation silicon valley over the past twenty six years, however, studies have shown that, even in the U.S., we can ring labour laws, doesn't always produce more innovation, it's a little level below which you shouldn't go, because if you take away working protections that often less willing to share ideas, a show what show knowledge that firms need for innovation, so study carried out using a Cambridge data by a group of economists from N.Y.U., a few years ago found that strengthening employment rights in a simpler countries, including the U.S., strengthening upon it.

  • Watch led to more innovation, measured by more pageant thing and citations similar study by the same group of researchers in California when labour laws were tightened.

  • A little bit to protect workers, a bit more from unfair all wrongful dismissal, there was more innovation insensible patenting an even more star tips by high tech small enterprises, which is very interesting.

  • So I think, possibly counterintuitive, but this studying, I think it's Simon deacon, Director of the centre for business, research at Cambridge University, relations between the U.S. and Russia, appear to have soured a little further today, Washington has ordered Moscow to clothes, within two days, it's concert in San Francisco, and two other trade missions correspondent Carrier Donahue is following developments out of Washington.

  • Well, the U.S. calls it, parity, a decision based on parity, which I think is diplomatic parlance for you started it, and here's a bit of tit for tat.

  • So effectively.

  • This is part of an ongoing row that started under President Obama when he threw out thirty five diplomats at Christmas, just before he stepped down when he became clear the Russia heard interfered in the election, all is the intelligence services here, said that to him and prison Pugin didn't actually retaliate straightaway.

  • He thought there'd be a new atmosphere, under President trump, but things have soured.

  • There's been new sanctions passed against Russia decided after that to hoik out seven hundred fifty five U.S. diplomats who have to leave by, we're always tomorrow, I think set the symptom of the first, and now the Americans have have retaliated with this, though, it's not quite the same kind of retaliation, because they're not actually chucking Russians out, they're closing this consulate and residents in San Francisco cuppa trade missions, which will be pleasant dipped economically for the Russians, but they're not chucking out, then I think that is, that is the sense in which they have perhaps not stepped over the brink, but stepped to the brink of this diplomatic row, leaving an opportunity open fur Rex to listen and Circe Lavrov in the sidelines of the U.N. general Assembly in September to try and sort this out a Correspondent carrier Donahue, confirming that, at least in Washington tomorrow is September first and just an update on the story.

  • Reuters news Agency is saying, just in the last couple of minutes that the white House has the decision to order Russia to close the consulate and the annexes was made by the President himself, who, in other news has pledged one million dollars of his personal money according to his press Secretary to help with the relief efforts in Texas, following tropical storm Harvey.

  • This is new coming up on the programme will be reflecting on twenty years to the day since this, the people everywhere, not just here in Britain, everywhere they kept faith with Princess Diana they liked her, they loved her.

  • They regarded her as one of the people, she was the people's Princess look back on the death of Diana, Princess of Wales and the impact it continues to have headlines, it's ours, we've been hearing from carrier Donahue, the United States, as ordered Russia to close its consulate in San Francisco, and two annexes elsewhere in a tit for tat response to Moscow, forcing a reduction in the U.S diplomatic staff in Russia, and one of the headline for the b. b. c.

  • Newsroom Venezuela's government is investigating an oil corruption scam allegedly involving the former Chief Prosecutor Luisa Ortega it with a b. b. c. world service and line from London, this is news that the South African President Jacob Zuma has had A tough time of it recently accused repeatedly of being up to his neck and corruption.

  • Those allegations have extended to the rest of my zoom as family.

  • So what's his son, I've got to say about it.

  • Do you do sarnies Zoomer is a business partner of the controversial Gupta family who themselves are mired in allegations of shady dealings over government contracts as southern Africa correspondent Milton cosy travel to Dubai, to meet two designers Zoomer, and he began by asking him why he thought the wealthy Gupta family had chosen him to be their business partner.

  • I think they like theirs.

  • I liked him, but I'm, I think I'm a likeable guy, but why did they like you, you think that's a patient of tossing modern, I think I'm a likeable guy is this is, this is not doing untoward about it, there's non pecking you don't look back and said, maybe they wanted me, because I am the son of the present, I look back, and I think I'm glad I met these guys, and I'm glad we all we got, and then we had this bulked out of the blue in twenty fifteen when the Deputy Minister fine could be see John that's comes out tells the public that he was offered a bribe, by the group Gupta's in your presence, where you present that day was, I'm going to see John has offered a bribe, by the Gupta's Mister Jonas was not offered a Are overcooked I did meet him, I was present, there was no such thing that what was the pebbles of his visit, then it wasn't.

  • No, it wasn't a visit per se, it was a meeting that was arranged from my side to of Dodd certain issues that had nothing to do with the cooked as any other related people sure you up clear, it's either you or telling the truth, or he's lying, it's absolutely so, which is it.

  • I'm telling you want the sun of the South African press in Dubai.

  • Why are you here.

  • Do you have a property here.

  • Firstly, I'm on business.

  • Secondly, to buyers is a wonderful place, and I'm sure you'd agree, and thirdly, I do not have a property in Dubai.

  • I not only an apartment in the Bush does your father.

  • Oh no, and up their houses and apartment here, my father owns this, it's, then the serious corn Ganja, it's a, no, then was, of him at all into buying, he does not only whatsoever.

  • Did the group does buy a property on his beat.

  • I think my father's a grown man.

  • He doesn't need anyone buying a property properties on his behalf, including myself, my home, my corrupt, there's a, I'm not.

  • I'm not.

  • I'm not involve myself seen myself in any corrupt practice when you corrupt business.

  • Are you quite sound that you may be, in the end, locked up following all these allegations going to prison for Corruption does that does that cross your mind, it just crossed my mind.

  • That's the first time, so I don't know if you saw a cutting, I'm not, it's gone, it doesn't cross, why should it worry at what is just cross not since you mention it now actually saw across in minutes, I was the son of the South African President, do you design me Zoomer and operating the grill was tha P.C.s Bilton Nkosi it was ten years ago that the former Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto was assassinated.

  • And today, a Court in Pakistan passed judgement on five suspected members of the Taliban charged with conspiracy to murder the five were acquitted.

  • Two police officers were jailed, but only for their negligence and failing to prevent the killing users own Bennett Jones has himself spent years investigating the assassination, there's been an investigation and a trial going on for years.

  • These people were picked up these five young lads fifteen years old when the murder actually happened, they were picked up very shortly afterwards.

  • And they've been languishing in prison ever since, with the case proceeding at a snail's pace, and then suddenly, for reasons I'd simply don't understand.

  • There's been a rush on to get daily hearing's now this verdict with the astonishing outcome that they will be acquitted why astonishing because there was a large amount of evidence presented to the Court, including their phone records on the day exactly where they were in the area around Benazir Bhutto just before her murder there was evidence which they provided in their very full confessions of exactly how they organised it, how they met up, how they actually lead the police to buildings in the Alp Indians have been used in the plot, and so on.

  • So all this evidence was, but the Court, in its wisdom, has acquitted and did the judges say why they were discounting this, I'm not away.

  • Yet, why this decision has been taken.

  • Quite often, what happens is that the investigation, the police put on is his flawed that the forensic techniques, they use are basically non existent or just don't work.

  • Don't stand up in Court.

  • But, you know, the end of the day, we'll have to see what the judge is saying about this, but there'll be many and Pakistan will be surprised by this outcome, and I can see the family, Benazir Bhutto's family are very surprised surprised and presumably dismayed.

  • Well, there is a question mark over the role of Benazir Bhutto's widower, in the sense that, when he was President in the five years.

  • Subsequent to her murder.

  • Many of her friends were dismayed to see how little, he did to investigate what I've got on.

  • Now that doesn't mean anything other than, yeah, it wasn't really investigated, for whatever reason, so there is, there's always been unhappiness amongst her loyalists about that, but certainly, of course, have the children.

  • They are desperate to know Who killed their mother, and they still don't have any answers.

  • Is this the end of it.

  • Do you think, well, I guess that's why it happened.

  • I've been if you've, except that bunch of fifteen year olds didn't dream is that themselves, and that they were organised to do it, and there was a conspiracy to murder her, then whoever always she always said, didn't I did it when she said it to you.

  • Surely, she told me, the people who's that she thought was involved people, and she would put at the deep state of Pakistan military establishment, whoever if we accept, there was a conspiracy, which you have to do fifteen year olds don't have to do this on their own accord.

  • Then whoever organised conspiracy, you'll be extremely pleased by today's result, cos the fact is that the case has collapsed.

  • The boys will presumably be set free.

  • And that's an end of it, so I guess you don't think you're going to take up, I mean the leads are going to be so old and cold by now.

  • So I think that it's not the first time, the Prime first Prime Minister of Pakistan, was assassinated.

  • That was never resolved general Zia was assassinated.

  • That was never resolved Benazir Bhutto has been assassinated it, whatever the result, I guess, partly because of that history, but also because she was assassinated.

  • What ten years ago, I have to ask the callous question, how much does it Matter to Pakistan.

  • Now that justice be done, I think it's necessary much to Pakistan that are two times.

  • Prime Minister, he's murdered there is quite a significant amount of evidence as to who did it.

  • And the case collapses after her ludicrously lack days ago effort to progress, it took ten years to get to the point where there's an acquittal minute says that Pakistan cannot defend its most important politicians, it cannot hold to account.

  • People who have murdered and organise the murder of one of the most important political personalities in the country's history, news has own Bennett Jones on the acquittal the surprising acquittals of those five suspects in the assassination of the former Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto you with news if you can stay with us, please do will be looking, among other things, at just how the brakes, it negotiations appear to be going.

  • Are they tough, or are they terrible that's coming up in the next thirty minutes.

  • Next on the business of Brecht's it.

  • First, let's hear about the business of football, soccer, to our American friends, because today is transfer deadline day for English, German, French and Italian football clubs to sell and purchase players and the money is well, I think the technical term is bonkers.

  • But that carries the football stats man for the times newspaper, if you look back over the past three decades, you can see that football transfer prices have risen by about forty fold.

  • If you look at the backs you nineteen ninety the top ten transfer fees, then paid by Christmas clubs.

  • I've reached one point two million Pounds.

  • Now, if you look at the top ten.

  • This summer, it's forty eight million Pounds.

  • So that's an extraordinary arise funded largely through television rights that companies will pay now you go back to nineteen ninety there was very little football on television.

  • This was before, satellite T.V., took over and allowed companies to have broadcast football on many different channels and to charge for it.

  • This summer, there's been the extra ingredient of Paris deciding name all the Brazilian player at Barcelona is worth two hundred million Pounds.

  • That's what they paid Barcelona earlier this month.

  • Now, Paris, now owned by the catarrh sports investments, who are an arm of the Qatari government, you could argue, they handsome political reasons for spending so much money to buy such a height profile player.

  • Whatever the reason, now that sort of set off a chain transfers around Europe, so Barcelona suddenly flush with cash.

  • Two hundred million, they promptly paid almost one hundred million for his men, they're late your dormant is only a twenty year old French player, and he played seven times for France bustle and then offered one hundred and thirty eight million to Liverpool for Philip could senior now Liverpool intern anticipated that sale cos they paid thirty five million Pounds each that Alex Chamberlin Mohammed Salah, meanwhile, today asked their Loss, it ninety two million Pounds to Monica, aided by Thomas, the law.

  • So it's a combination of both.

  • This huge extra money from the T.V. rights, and the fact that if you have this one high profile player like name a setting this new world record, it will sort of drag.

  • Everybody else up in his way, yes, because Liverpool.

  • No, that Barcelona.

  • Two hundred million in their back pockets.

  • And so they can say, well, we went self elected, and finally, Barcelona, go up and up and up and up to some astronomical or maps, when they're offering.

  • One hundred and thirty eight million for Kitty Liverpool any signed Tina to eight million four years ago and bill is your best guess at this will continue.

  • Every year, we seem to scratch our heads and say, you can't go on, and it does, certainly in terms of the U.K. football fans seem to be exploited, as it were, as much as they can.

  • They're paying as much as they want.

  • I suspect for football, you go back thirty years.

  • Apart from paying through the turnstiles to go to a match, it was very little way of putting your money into football at you.

  • Do you think is getting a bit ridiculous.

  • Now bill had Kurt film, the times newspaper and the insanity of the transfer window almost over, this is news live from the b. b. c. in the heart of the European Union in the polished corridors Of Brussels, a sound is growing louder.

  • It's the sound of drawers grinding teeth gnashing a cloud of impatience is billowing over the bricks it negotiations.

  • Today, at a press conference, the two Chief protagonists, the you negotiate negotiator, Michelle Barney, eh.

  • And his British counterpart David Davis gave rather different opinions as to how those fraught and complex discussions are going Europe correspondent Kevin Connelly was watching behind closed doors, the brakes, it process, he's getting tetchy and tech cheer.

  • If you want some sort of clue as to how much Britain is going to hand over as part of his divorce settlement and the U.K., says the European science demands, not just massively over egged the mounted on pretty flimsy legal arguments to, so the British tactic this week has been to push back on those demands and ask for a proper line by line explanation.

  • We shall Barney, if they were peers to detect an old fashioned reluctance to pay up disguised as a point of diplomatic principal after this week, it is clear that your gate doesn't feel you go to your guy wished to or his obligations.

  • After departure.

  • How can we build trust and start discussing her future polishing shape, we need to address to get listen shoes.

  • So, really, and we've got ours, a dark suspicion is growing on the British side there, when the E.U. talks about progress.

  • They really only means the extent to which Britain is prepared to agree with It in that spirit, David Davis clearly came prepared for an argument about money and equally clearly got one.

  • He is adamant that unpicking what he and his team regard as extravagant demands is just a basic negotiating tactic and, more importantly, that the U.K. is a country that pays its bill once it sure what it's being asked to pay for, that is, we wear a country which meets international obligations, or continue to do so.

  • Those obligations will be well specified, they'll be real.

  • They don't necessarily have to be legal.

  • We also recognise moral obligation, sometimes it will course lead to difficult exchanges, nobody will pretend it was anything but a tough exchange as weak, but I think the British taxpayer would expect nothing less.

  • Even with two media savvy pros on stage, it's becoming clear that the talks are deadlocked.

  • And there's particular interest in what Michelle Barney has to say, because he is not only the y. you'd lead negotiator, he's also the man who decide whether or not.

  • Britain's made enough progress by October to allow him to recommend to the E.U. heads of government, they should start talking about her future trade deal with the U.K., not much progress to report fernack and not much time to go till October.

  • Stand by for the one week of meetings a month pace to be intensified.

  • Kevin Connolly sounds like he's looking forward to it.

  • A few people have better contacts among the power brokers, Of the European Union than Charles grant the long time, Director of the centre for European reform, behind the public pronouncements from the two sides.

  • Was he hearing on the inside, about the negotiations, the Purcell relations are O.K., that hasn't been a lot of storming out a lot of rudeness or unpleasantness.

  • But there is on that side growing frustration with the fact that the British had not actually put forward concrete proposals on some of the key issues that matter most liked the money.

  • Question, and there is still a feeling that the British don't really realise that to exaggerate somewhat, they're going to have to take the deal that E.U. offers them cos if they don't take the deal that won't be a deal, and that's really very bad for the British economy in quite bad for the European or can't be, but because the European side think they hold most of the cars.

  • They think they can afford to wait for the British to come round and accept what the European side regards as reality, and I think there are some signs of that in the British now accept that will be a transitional phase, the British are only some private prepared to say that will pay.

  • Quite a substantial amount of money, but I think the European side thinks time is on their side, because the longer the British delay in getting it down to the nitty gritty of the negotiation, the longer we have To wait till that you will agree to talk about trade, and that is where the twenty seven a United at the moment, people often do you talk about the fact that the consensus is that the European Union has more leverage in these negotiations than the United Kingdom, because, so the received wisdom goes, the U.K. has more relatively to lose.

  • It's also tough for the United Kingdom, because, in a sense, if it's Chief negotiator, David Davis, wants to have a modicum of flexibility, or he needs to do is go back to the Prime Minister or senior members of the cabinet for Michelle Barney, the E.U. itself is so much more unwieldy.

  • It's actually more difficult for him to show flexibility.

  • Yes, that is a point, the British negotiators mate, and there is truth that point, but sometimes I think they go too far in implying that, if only those wonderful Member States like critically, France and Germany could play a bigger role in the go shaky very missus make her talk directly to Emmanuel mackerel a Wrangler Merkel, the log jam would be unblocked.

  • I think the British wrongly think that this very hardline Commission is stopping a compromise.

  • And the truth is the real power lies the Member States of the particular France and Germany in pushing the Commission to take a tough line.

  • Do you get a sense, given how by now well rehearsed some of the sticking points are particularly over how much Money, the United Kingdom is in hock for is it just a matter of sort of both sides.

  • Finding political cover, or do you think the numbers really still have to be thrashed, I think the exact number probably won't be decided until shortly before the whole deal is put together, perhaps a year from now, if it is, but what the E.U. wants is a cycle methodology, it's a way of working out the number, and I think progress on this is possible, but on both sides, the moderate forces are going to have to face down the hardliners on the British side, there are people in the British government, who are willing to say, look, let's do a transitional deal three years in the transition, where almost like members that we wouldn't have a vote in the Council's, so we will pay roughly ten billion Euros a year.

  • Three years.

  • That's a big chunk of what he is looking for the rest of what he's looking for can be handed to specialist committees.

  • That is a view in the British government is also due in certainly parts of the Brussels institutions and in the French government and some other governments have the course in the British system, there are hardliners who think that's been found to be generous to a twenty seven partners and the E.U. system.

  • There are hardliners as well, and think that if the British want to pay the so thirty billion, which the E.U. Thinks the British really do about them.

  • Find with anything.

  • One of them stay in the single market, a transition, I have to pay extra for that privilege, just like Norway, so on both sides, the hardliners are preventing you do my guess would be some sort of compromise, along the lines I mentioned will, in the end, happened because I don't think there's any other way of getting the Greens, ultimately, both sides do want an agreement, so the British will have to do an awful lot of giving her, not so much.

  • Taking these negotiations from all that you're saying it sounds as if this sort of benchmark of encode sufficient progress by October.

  • The next summit looks pretty unlikely.

  • At the moment, it looks unlikely that he will be able to declare sufficient progress by the October summit allowing trade talks to start, this is because the British if that was to happen, would have to give ground, quite quickly on two key issues.

  • One is the money issue.

  • The second is the transitional arrangements that use only prepared to offer one sort of transition that is very close to membership, but without Britain having any votes in the institution.

  • So Britain would be in the supermarket in the customs Union pay money into the budget, except free movement, and except rulings of the Court of justice.

  • Some Eurosceptics, you'll find that rather hard to accept, but that is, in fact, what the British rule, I believe, Except, because that's the only kind of transition, the use probes contemplate there isn't time you says, I think, rightly, to create a customised set of transitional arrangements specially for the British that would kitchen.

  • When we leave, and then kick out when the future free trade agreement enters into a suspect.

  • If the British moved quickly on those two issues, then I think sufficient progress could be declared in October, but the way it looks in Brussels, the British had not yet moving quickly enough to make those offers, so that you can say his progress has been made, and trade talks can start Charles grant the Director of the centre for European has invited bids for the construction of a huge hydro electric dam inside one of the country's largest game reserves the country's long suffered power shortages and the government says that the new project would double electricity capacity.

  • However, it's due to be built in the world heritage listed Saint Sandhu game reserve, which has prompted concern from, among others, the world wildlife Fund Anthony field is the W.W.F. international campaigns manager, we are looking to protect salu, it's got massive benefits for Tanzania and massive potential for Tanzania, in terms of the tourism industry in growing that, and there are alternatives available for developing and producing hydropower in Tanzania, that were on the table.

  • Prior to this announcement, we're asking the government of Tanzania, to act responsibly and to carry out their valuations to ensure That this is really going to be the right decision for Tanzania, it's people from what I understand the footprint of this dam is just three per cent of the park would would it be that damaging, you're absolutely right.

  • The direct footprint of this is three per cent of the park.

  • However, there will be potentially fishing villages around the edge of the lake, there'll be access routes to that there will be increased infrastructure to support them, and that's all going to have an impact on what is a wilderness area and was designated a world heritage site.

  • Because of the Wilton this value and the populations of elephants and rhinos.

  • In addition, research, there'll be talk, you've had commissions on this project highlights that there is a risk to two hundred thousand livelihoods down river outside of the saloon.

  • So, whilst the direct footprint is three per cent of the saloon, actually, the impact of this dam is three per cent, because of the dam in the reservoir outside of that the impacts go for tens of kilometres are right, the way to the coast, and will impact on hundreds of thousands of people, but if you're talking about impact on hundreds of thousands of people, I guess, the government in Tanzania, and, and, and a lot of people in Tanzania, would say that far more of us suffer from the chronic power shortages that blight the country that this hydro electric dam would would go a Long way to changing that absolutely and W.W.F. wants Tanzania to develop, we want them to develop in a beneficial way for the country and for the people, and they do need power for their economy and their growing population, there are alternatives to this project that we're on the table.

  • Prior to this announcement, and we would look to the government to do these assessments and evaluate the alternatives.

  • Against this project, to make sure this is the right decision, and he's going to have the maximum benefit for the country in terms of the animals that might be affected.

  • What have you done any sort of mapping all guesswork as to what the impact could be.

  • Well, if you're building a big hydro powered dam with reservoir behind it, that's going to cover a suggested by the Tanzanian government.

  • One thousand three hundred fifty square kilometres, that is going to flood that habitat, which is a very vibrant habitat, next to the river, the elephants that migrate through the area will be impacted the rhinoceros will be impacted.

  • These are species that have been in the sluice for as long as we've known and have suffered dramatically from poaching and the Tanzanian government is doing some absolutely brilliant work in reviving their population numbers, just at the levels, where we are now starting to see a massive reduction in the poaching.

  • So we're hoping that the populations will be increasing, and this damn starts to put pressure back On those populations from that Anthony field from the W.W.F. on Tanzania's plans to build a big hydroelectric plant inside the salu game reserve, you're with news from the B.B.C., to have our top story.

  • This, the French government has presented its controversial plans to change the country's labour laws, including measures to make it easier for bosses to hire and fire, not everyone is convinced that they will have such a huge impact, as I heard from the labour law expert Simon deacon, I think there's clearly a political imperative to be seen to be doing something about French labour market, partly because of pressure from Germany to do that, whether these reforms will actually lead to a major change and, either, French label all the weather from supermarket works in this really doubtful.

  • I think one of the headline story, we've been looking at the United States has ordered Russia to close its consulate in San Francisco, and two annexes elsewhere in a tit for tat response to Moscow, forcing a reduction in U.S. diplomatic staff in Russia, this is news that live from the b. b. c. with me.

  • Tim Franks in Paris and in London today, people gathered to mark the death.

  • Twenty years ago to the day of Princess Diana, she was killed in a car crash in Paris.

  • And there followed a remarkable outpouring of emotion, across the United Kingdom, along with some anger towards the Royal family accused at the time of being Out of touch and unfeeling the B.B.C.'s Royal correspondent Peter hunt looks back at an extraordinary episode Diana, Princess of Wales, was in hospital in Paris tonight seriously injured after a road accident close companion, Dodi al Fayed has been killed.

  • Initially, it was thought this was a Princess in peril.

  • Who could be rescued, a former Queen in waiting, who would survive a crash in a Paris tunnel.

  • I first heard about the accident.

  • What twenty five past eleven U.K. time on Saturday night, a reporter at sea and Elliot lighter he phoned up to, say, can you tell me about the crash Dickie arbiter had worked for Diana and then went into the living room switched on the T.V. and saw this thing unfolding, and I thought, my goodness, nobody can possibly survive.

  • And then there was nothing his instinct was right, a drunken driver with photographers in pursuit had crashed into the tunnels thirteenth pillar, killing three of the four occupants.

  • Now, at twenty past five, there is an official announcement here's Andrew Crawford, Buckingham Palace has confirmed the death of Diana, Princess of Wales.

  • In a statement, it said, the Queen and Prince Philip, were deeply shocked and distressed by this terrible news throughout the night.

  • Tony Blair spoke with his officials in the first flush of his Premiership.

  • He was searching for the words that would best capture a nation's pain at the loss of a Princess the people everywhere, not just here in Britain, Everywhere.

  • They kept faith with Princess Diana they liked her, they loved her.

  • They regarded her as one of the people, she was the people's Princess, and that's how she wore stay how she will remain in our hearts and in our memories for ever on a different continent.

  • The media was clamouring for a reaction from old Spencer outside is Cape town, home Diana's brother obliged, in a way, the reporters might not have anticipated, and in a way that provided a foretaste of the eulogy.

  • He would deliver six days later, this is not a time for recriminations but for sadness.

  • However, I would say that I always believe the press would kill her.

  • Not even I could imagine that they would take such a direct hand in her death, her seems to be the case, it would appear that every proprietor and editor of every publication that has paid for intrusive and exploitative photographs of her encouraging greedy and ruthless individuals to risk everything in pursuit of Diana's image has blood on his hands.

  • Today, the passing of the Prime ministerial enabled people's Princess was marked by the people in their thousands.

  • They came to Palace gates to leave flowers and to weep an uncharacteristic displaying at the time of British emotion on this day at this time.

  • Twenty years ago, few would have been in a position to predict how the public reaction would grow and how the windsors would be wrong footed by the perception That they were geographically and emotionally detached from a country, and it's suffering on this evening in nineteen ninety seven, the priority was bringing Diana home in life after divorce, she was stripped of her H.R.H. title in death, the coffin of Diana, Princess of Wales, was covered with the Royal stand Peter hunt on the impact of the death of Diana, twenty years on, if you were listening to the programme.

  • Yesterday, and you weren't upset me by telling me that you weren't you'll have heard the U.S. Ambassador on disarmament, making the familiar call from Washington for China to exert more pressure on North Korea.

  • How much late leverage does North Korea's giant neighbour really have for this episode of his regular China Desk, we thought it would be timely to ask a Beijing correspondent John sub with to tell us throughout a tense past few weeks as Donald trump and Kim Jong and frayed threats Beijing has when it has been saying anything been repeating it's well worn mantra calls for calm and a return to dialogue, and it has in the past few hours been at it again, playing the grown up in the room.

  • Here's the Chinese foreign Office spokeswoman acquire challenging and out, it was a current of ten situation on the producer is nada screenplay, I've read your game.

  • It is for real.

  • And he sent your menace and the serious, they're directly involved a safety of people from both the North and South of the peninsula, as well.

  • Peace and stability of the entire region.

  • We help us all parties can truly take a responsible attitude with your caddy to the people of India, countries and their region and make a rationale and a wise choices.

  • Washington's view has long been that China, North Korea's biggest trading partner, could do more, but doesn't want to, partly because the bonds run so deep and can be traced back to the Chinese intervention on North Korea's side in the career, the shared loss of life is brought into stark relief by the crap they newsreels of the day.

  • There's a certain truth in this, but the real reason for China's caution is more pragmatic than emotional today, while it's urged to do more to make sanctions bite against North Korea, it worries that if it really turns off the life support, two things will result first North Korea's incentive to develop nuclear weapons with which to use as leverage against a hostile outside world only increases, and, secondly, regardless of the success of that strategy.

  • North Korea will be pushed to the brink of economic collapse, bringing chaos and a refugee crisis to China's recent trip to the border city of damned I watched as a band of North Korean women played electric guitars and drums for Chinese Custer most Chinese people nowadays view, North Korea, with a mixture of pity and been used a reminder of their own totalitarian impoverished past, although one Man planning a short tourist trip across the river said he hoped to see something tell me people think.

  • North Korea is a backboard Alice, but I hope to see it's developed now that isn't as far fetched as it might sound, despite the sanctions trade in consumer goods has been booming in recent years, privileged wealthy North Korean urbanites have access to fashionable clothes electronic goods, and, increasingly, even cars, and this hopes China is really the way forward that North Korea should be brought in from the cold through economic in gage mints not isolation and it fits, of course, it's exactly the same model that China embarked upon itself.

  • All those years ago, three sees Beijing correspondent John Sutter a resplendent behind the news, our China Desk, that's it.

  • From this edition of the programme for me.

  • Tim Franks, and the rest of the team here in London.

  • Thank you very much for listening is our has been a download from the B.B.C. to discover more and our terms of use with it, b. b. c. dot com slash podcast.