Maria Von Trapp Maria Tom Professor Margaret Macmillan Bethany Bell Von Trapp Royal Belfast Roberts Richard Blurton Reporter, Michelle Professor Macmillan President Montero Mp Tom Michelle Roberts Margaret Lord Shiva Lord Ganesh Hindus Stuart Charles Stuart Charles Stewart A Belfast Bangladesh Houston Salzburg United States Louisiana India Texas North Korea Mumbai City Of Salzburg Asia Japan Venezuela Uk Uk Thora Tennessee South Western South East United States Salzburg City Pyongyang Pegasus Parvati Orleans Nepal Mozart Memphis London Ireland Iraq Gulf Of Mexico Greenwich Geneva Galveston Bay Falklands Euston Crimea Crete Columbus British Museum Britain Bordeaux Bombay Austria

Global News Podcast 2017-08-30:15:27.00
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  • This is the B.B.C. for details of a complete range of programmes go to B.B.C. world service dot com forward slash, Welcome to the latest global news recorded at thirteen hours G.M.T. on Wednesday for thirtieth of August, I Nick with a selection of highlights from across B.B.C. world service news today coming up aid workers say thousands, if a hinge of Muslims have fled across the border from me and Mars right kind state into Bangladesh to escape Burmese military action.

  • Many sitting just in front of the waiting for boiling and small set with all of their belongings hauling two, there are small children, the un acute is the Venezuelan government of trying to instil fear in its population.

  • The authorities, we believe, have responded with a demonstration with repression or repression that has, taking the form of extensive human rights violations.

  • Tropical storm Harvey hit Louisiana and the misery in Houston, goes on.

  • We have a guy who never showed up some time this morning, they've found his vehicle in some sort of North Korea says it's firing of a missile over Japan was the first step in a Pacific operation, but we ask did it constitute an act of war.

  • And do you remember the film based on the singing governess Maria von Trapp, sorry, I just knew I was seeing.

  • I think it would be good to name a street after here.

  • Find out why The city of Salzburg in Austria has decided not to honour one of its most famous former residents, the international organisation for migration says, thousands of a hinge of Muslims have fled across the border from me and Mars Rach, I'm state into Bangladesh to escape the Burmese military violence in rat kind state involving the majority, Buddhists and Muslim or hinges isn't unusual, but this fresh outbreak has been described as one of the worst in the past five years, the latest clashes were sparked on Friday after a hinge or militants attacked police posts when similar attacks happened last year me and Myles military, launched a crackdown on the Ranger that led to claims of severe human rights abuses, the b. b. sees me s. a beer has been to the refugee camps at Cox's Bazaar in Bangladesh, near the border with me, Emma, many sitting just in front of the waiting for oiling and small set with all of their belongings hauling to their small children. vast majority of them women and children, and hired some dreadful of stories from them, or some of them are very similar security forces came to shooting at people searching for a young man and binding, so they're just grab anything big and dyfed with a border, and many of them have in boxers buzz game here as if it is, I'll get them shelter and full well for analysis of the refugee situation in Bangladesh.

  • Here's a South Asia editor, John a gibbering people, certainly on the Bangladesh side sound quite overwhelmed.

  • They are used to people coming over in large numbers.

  • We know that since October, we're looking at about one hundred thousand people have come over quite recently, but this is a much more intense influx as a fresh crisis, a lot of the people that are arriving and need medical treatment.

  • Some of them have bullet wounds that at the pit clearly been sustained recently, and a lot of them seem to have come without warning, cos they're bringing very little with them.

  • They say that people have been coming in such large numbers.

  • They haven't had the chance yet to sit down with them and hear their stories and get a proper account of what, what's been happening to them, but some of them do seem quite traumatised does Bangladesh have a policy regarding refugees from well.

  • Absolutely.

  • I mean, the policy is that they deny them entry and the border is being patrolled.

  • And we know that there are thousands of people, we don't know exactly how many who are sort of stuck in this, no man's land between the two borders, because they know the patrols.

  • Are there, they're not managing to get through.

  • So is saying they are sending people back, but clearly, people are getting through in large numbers that begs the question, why it could just be that they, the Bangladeshi forced doesn't have the capacity to patrol all of the Border effectively does a long, difficult Bordeaux involving a river and some jungle areas, for example, where people can sneak through, or it could be that they're kind of turning a bit of a blind guy.

  • Certainly, the U.N. has asked Bangladesh to let people come in, they say, where people need to flee violence, they should be allowed to have sanctuary gillman give ring there, as we record this podcast tropical storm half, he has made landfall again, this time in Louisiana.

  • He first hit the neighbouring state of Texas last week bringing record breaking downpours and devastating floods, one of the worst affected cities is Houston, where thousands have been forced from their homes, a reporter Neda Taufiq has been speaking to people, emergency responders spent yet another day, trying to rescue the many, still imprisoned in their homes by the rising water, but among the most urgent pleas for help was to find those still unaccounted for.

  • We have a guy who left last night, never showed up some time this morning, they've found his vehicle in some sort of these state troopers are searching on a range on the outskirts of Columbus, Texas.

  • So we've gone as far as we can by horror at this point, the state policeman.

  • I just feuding there, why this point of the road that has it's now filled with flowing water, after almost twenty minutes they return no sign of the guy at all, he's still going to come out Somewhere further down the Creek and, but at this point, we just don't know, you gotta keep hope, but it doesn't look good.

  • The bar you sitting is struggling to provide people with their most basic needs at the city's mean shelter.

  • They were a double their capacity, some evacuees to sleep on there called tile Thora I hate is, I never being in a place like this before.

  • To see this, you know, everybody from my neighbourhood.

  • This making me feel better that they hear that they're not under there, what, how does, and we'll go home.

  • The way I was feeling views than his Dave is a meteorologist for w. w. l. t. v. based in new Orleans in Louisiana.

  • He began by telling me about the current situation in Houston, the only good news is that the rain has finally starting to come to an end.

  • Across the Houston area after a record rainfall tropical system records here in United States, and that continues to, of course, flood the city.

  • One good thing there much in the rain is coming to an end, and tropical storm Harvey making landfall early today, here in United States and South Western, and what that's going to do is, there's that finally moves in the crust that we last part of the South East United States or starting some sunshine.

  • Returning to Houston and them northerly winds on the backside of their tropical system, or slowly help to push the water Back out in to Galveston Bay and into the Gulf of Mexico, just slowly, the waters will recede across that used to be, but clearly, it's going to take a lot of time to recover from the damage it will take months, probably years here in the world once, of course, just behind our twelve year anniversary parking Katrina.

  • Some places here in her words are still recovering twelve years later used end and will probably have hopefully not twelve years and time by probably years to recover.

  • We build homes will have to be guided, because it's so humid down here, unlike over there, that the mould can build up, if you don't take care of her quickly and so a lot of these folks.

  • Hopefully they have flood insurance here and were able to get that covered, if not the rebuilding process will take a very, very long time.

  • Just tell us the path of the storm.

  • Now it is moving towards you, as you say, it is to making her way in fall this morning.

  • Here are United States, just South of the city of lake, now that's going to move on ensue parts of central Louisiana head eventually up toward the Memphis, Tennessee area over the next couple of days.

  • What that's going to do is take the wean or with which should dry out much of the Houston, Texas area as a sister moves in, then it loses its tropical characteristics just becomes irregular Area of low pressure stuck or pick up some heavier rain for many areas across the South East, but nothing at all like what they saw across the Euston area, all the way to your inner world, so we haven't got these orders to evacuate now here across our area anywhere else, it was just across the Houston area were searching rescues continue, as some folks are stranded in the home, some of them, climbing and root are waiting to be rescued.

  • I was David nest brown still on the weather theme, South Asia is being hit by some of the worst monsoon floods in years, millions who have been affected.

  • In India, Nepal, and Bangladesh with several hundred people killed heavy rain in India's biggest city Mumbai caused waist deep flooding in some areas, forcing, schools and businesses to close, and there've been some deaths there, the b. b. c.

  • Sir, and to R.E. told me how she'd been affected herself, the architect made them and why we eat and water at some point.

  • Yesterday, on Tuesday, and that man, I like us were trapped in the Office ring how stop them there with a light drizzle overnight, and add Gimp.

  • Yes, you know what, how's Ricky good, and there are others slowly returning to normal train packed the amber, everything's happy Ian, but with delay, then that's really crucial in Mumbai.

  • The cards ten hundred thousand of people rely on the real, Barristers and a thin of it Up in there, but they're a big problem.

  • Now, this is a city of more than twenty million people, when the transport network called down, and people are I literally strangled many feet in a work like work tweeted last night out off with theirs.

  • And businesses organised feared her people and some form of bedding and opposite the school are still shut today have got by tomorrow at looks like things should be normal.

  • Did you telecine monsoons happen every year, so why the particular problem now.

  • Well, yes, it is ring while particularly bad official pure a thing at the worth in two thousand and five ain't you, pen, and I must have this, if you weren't entirely submerged in more than five hundred people lost their lives.

  • Now it's become clear that this yesterday, I don't read you are don't happen, but the priority here, where the authorities be here to clear the roads, lots of trees, a bowl and down across the city, they've got a lot of Barbara edge on the street, the authorities know that monks in wedding happened.

  • Every year, and that they're the high cancer, but happy, didn't you.

  • Then happening again.

  • But the problem in Bombay or growing Mumbai or growing a exponentially.

  • There's lots of construction, a coastal area and litter is a big problem, which many people, I've got a media, I think, Quark watch away.

  • Yes, you're Gay the greeny chrystella also unable to cope with the population Number than speed that buildings are going up the questions are being asked about why Ricky that's trying to build itself in the financial hub, a global financial hub is still vulnerable to such heavy monsoon rain.

  • Every year.

  • That was the B.B.C.'s, Sir, and John had to worry mass demonstrations in Venezuela against the rule of President Montero began in April.

  • Now, in a hard hitting report the un has accused the Venezuelan government of trying to instil fear in its population to stop the demonstrations, the U.N. human rights Office says the security forces have deliberately carried out human rights violations since anti government protests erupted for months ago.

  • Imogen folks has been speaking to the head of the U.N. investigation team and Alice who presented the report in Geneva.

  • We were surprised by the nature and extent of the human race relations.

  • We never imagined, he would be fail Asians would be saw widespread so generalised we were differences were priced animals face two sides angry with each other and violence escalated, or was there something more systematic and I know if you can character anything to say to each other.

  • I think one side, the government, with the monopoly your before us.

  • On the other side, if the population, which wants to express itself, which ones to demonstrate an express its grievances, which should be allowed to demonstrate this should be considered by then better comment that's an opportunity to engage in Dale, you've interviewed various Demonstrators.

  • Some of her, we were detained and someone.

  • What were they telling you about the treatment of the people we interviewed all the leaping, we could not interviews for the thing is because we were in prison.

  • We interviewed, their families and lawyers, they are systematically complained about the ill treatment during treatment.

  • Men, for example, beatings, he'd meant something's application of electric shock him very sensitive parts of the body in men, and also very bad conditions of the tension is this kind of approach, then, do you see it as a deliberate strategy prevent demonstrations to make people just think I want, I am not going to go out and demonstrate definitely, we think that, because of the extent of their most creations of demonstrations and extent of the invite and the fact that some of them are widespread.

  • Some of them were systematic we think this response to a repressive policy from the government, with the ultimate goal, to stop the demonstrations that was valets from the un..

  • You're listening to global news, the most important stories and the best interviews, an on the spot.

  • Reporting from the B.B.C. world service.

  • Remember, every weekend, you can hear a review of the week's main new stories and why they matter that's in the world.

  • This week, and the programme's also available to download from our website, w. w. w. dot baby see dot co dot U.K. forward slash programmes still to come.

  • In this podcast doctors in A Belfast hospital hope, a new meningitis test could save lives, if they see somebody who comes in, they've got a high suspicion that they've got meningitis, they'll be able to use this test to confirm their hunch, and they should get a result back within sixty minutes North Korea says it's firing of a missile over Japan was the first step of military operations in the Pacific signalling plans for more launches clearly, it was an act of hostility by Pyongyang but did the launch constitute an act of war, the b. b. sees damn Damon has been speaking to the British m. p.

  • Tom took and heart, who chairs the foreign Affairs Committee and Professor Margaret Macmillan, a war historian at Oxford University, when he asked, Professor Macmillan, was the last time a country actually officially declared war against one another.

  • I don't think we've done that, since nineteen forty five, I mean declarations of war have simply gone out of fashion and countries now just make threatening noises, and then go to war, I'm afraid.

  • I can't think of one either, but I do know that when we went to war in the Falklands, for example, it was not even described as a war, it was described as a conflict, we've tended to use U.N. security Council resolutions, or, we, you're right.

  • Wi the language is definitely talk about police actions interventions, and the war in Iraq.

  • Two thousand three was there any declaration of war.

  • Or Was it just the T.V. cameras catching, shock and awe, that meant the war had started, there was no formal declaration of war.

  • I think there was again a U.N. resolution, which the United States and Britain took us sufficient grounds to go to war, part of the reason, I think that the United States, certainly has not had declarations of war is because those have to be done by Congress, and I think Presidents have tended to try and avoid going to Congress for what can be damaging debate.

  • What difference does this, make them to the peace of the world.

  • Tom took him out.

  • For me, it's a matter of concern, not because I think we have any particular drive to go, Shh walk quite on the country in order to make sure we don't do it by accident.

  • And I just think that the way that the world is moving with, for example, cyber attacks closing down networks finance networks, and sometimes even power networks with kidnappings and assassinations.

  • One's got to begin to ask when is a hostile act, an act of war, and when is it just a crime.

  • I agree.

  • I think we're in a very dangerous situation.

  • And we had a sort of agreement, since the end of nineteen forty five that countries would not go to war, and we've we've actually had very few unprovoked war, as we, we've had tensions escalating into wars, but I think what is dangerous.

  • Now, as We don't seem to be agreeing on the rules.

  • And finally, um outfits.

  • But even in war rules help Margaret's point is absolutely right, for example, is stealing the secrets of a ceramics factory, an acceptable thing, but stealing the secrets of a nuclear weapon, not if we don't accept there are lines and everything's blurred.

  • Then we end up in situations where we seize upon excuses, rather than having to justify claim, and at that point, the country that thought it was behaving a little bit badly won't have realise that it's crossed the line and gone into war in that would be bad for everyone, and we had a situation post nineteen forty five where countries formally, I think it's in the U.N. Charter renounced war as an instrument of policy.

  • And so war became something that you could fight defensively, but you didn't do deliberately, and I think this was actually a very good principle, and I think we're seeing the freeing of that principle, the Russian invasion of Crimea, for example, was an example of the fraying and the provocative moves by North Korea.

  • I mean, it seems to me that they're playing a very dangerous game here.

  • It's the slow progress, isn't it.

  • Of international standards of humanitarian law in effect, for example, the international criminal Court, which is trying to impose upon those who lead countries, some sense of having a responsibility to protect their citizens.

  • Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't, and I guess that's the same with this idea that you should not use war as a policy, what we're really looking for here is an open discussion and a discussion, actually, that should be an open global discussion, which is why it's important, the world service is covering this, that means that countries understand what is and what is not within the bounds acceptable, so that we don't find ourselves accidentally triggering a war, when actually all we meant to do all the other country meant to do was to gain a minor tactical advantage.

  • I was the M.P. Tom took in hearts and along with Professor Margaret Macmillan.

  • Both were speaking to damn Damon a small touring exhibition from the British Museum in London, marking the Festival of the elephant headed Hindu God can esher is proving an unexpected summer hit.

  • It's on course to attract three quarters of a million visitors Sangita my mice, has been finding out about the exhibition centrepiece a thirteenth century sculpture of esher and the man who once owned it major general Charles Stuart of the East Indian company army.

  • I'm Richard Blurton, I'm head of the sloth and South East section here in the Department of Asia out the British, it's almost two metres in height, and it depicts Lord Ganesh the elephant headed auspicious God of beginnings and also sometimes the place.

  • Tell me about how this elephant headed God came to be, according to Indian mythology.

  • His mother, the goddess, Parvati, Who is married to Lord Shiva, the greats God was lonely, so she gets very fed up and, in the end, she decides right if she was not going to come and be with me.

  • I'm going to make my own fashioned from the girth that has produced benches washing her body, a little model, and this true eons after if you left poverty comes back, he returns, and she finds this handsome young man standing guard at the doorway of the bedroom tutors Consort poverty and not recognising him, he cuts Office.

  • He's absolutely distraught shiver, and it is full of remorse, and he orders his followers to rush out and find the head of the first being that they encounter.

  • And, the first being encountered his elephant.

  • And from the elephant, because on the body of Greenwich and history of the British collection goes back to one individual major general Charles Stewart, and he was known by the sobriquet as Hindus Stuart, because to fellow European society.

  • He was seduced by India, frankly, he is supposed to have gone daily to booth and gantry is he's supposed to have had bradman's in attendance at his House, and he was suggesting that there was a sort of understanding on his part that Indian culture and history wasn't just something to look at in the slightly quizzical manner, but actually, he made the effort to understand the ancient nature of it, but that's absolutely right.

  • He actually decided that Certain elements of Indian society were preferable to European society, and has that received, well, not with favour, he was also very interesting vocal in his opposition to missionary activity in India.

  • He published against it, primarily because he felt that the Indian religious system was fundamental tenants, which were attractive and humanistic, and I think this is the really important thing utterly approach.

  • Thank you to my scar with that report, a hospital emergency Department in northern Ireland is to start using a new rapid test for meningitis that should speed up diagnosis of the infection and save lives.

  • It's a two year pilot study, and if it goes well, it's hoped that effort will be rolled out more widely more for my health.

  • Reporter, Michelle Roberts doctors at the Royal Belfast hospital sick children are going to start trialling it in there any Department.

  • So if they see somebody who comes in, they've got a high suspicion that they've got meningitis, they'll be able to use this test to confirm their hunch, and they should get a result back within sixty minutes, it works on blood or spinal fluid, or even a nasal swab and, at the moment, it takes two days does it for results to come back, it does the current way of doing it is to take a sample of blood or spinal fluid sent it off to the lab and try and grow the bacteria that might be in it and check what the Infection is of the sea.

  • In the meantime, every minute counts with meningitis, because it can kill within hours, so doctors have to just rely on their clinical judgement, rather than a test result and treat accordingly, but they're hoping that by using this new test, they'll be able to much quicker tell if their hunches are right, and sort of reassure patients, and maybe also stop over treating, what's the significance of this, it sounds quite ground breaking, if you like, well, it's been a long time coming.

  • We've been looking for new test that could help with rapid diagnosis.

  • Obviously, this still needs to be child, which is why this one hospital emergency Department is going to be using it.

  • Thankfully, there are good vaccines out there.

  • Now to help protect people against meningitis, so cases, fewer than they have been in the past, which is good news in terms of numbers, it's not going to save hundreds of thousands of lives, but it could mean the difference, because sometimes, it's very hard to pick up, which cases can rapidly become dangerous.

  • And it is a killer.

  • Still, I was the B.B.C.'s health reporter Michelle Roberts.

  • Now, every year.

  • Three hundred thousand tourists come to the Austrian town of Salzburg.

  • Because of one of the world's best loved movies, the sound of music, the film is based on the real life story of Maria, the trainee nun who becomes governess to the children of the von Trapp family, Marriage, their father, and then the whole family escaped the Nazis a Salzburg city councillor recently suggested naming a street after Maria von Trapp, but her application was turned down by the city because Maria von Trapp used corporal punishment on her children Bethany Bell reports from Oxford wandering along a little footpath and bicycle lane that meanders through the green suburbs of Salzburg and on my right, I can see the foothills of the Alps that surround the city.

  • This path, doesn't have a name, not long ago, a local politician called my Vandal came up with the idea of naming it after a woman, he's done more to put this city on the map than anyone except Mozart Maria von Trapp, I wanted to name the street after an I.V.F. and Club, because she's famous person Salzburg her family's famous insults and very important for salt, but for the country into city.

  • It's a city of Salzburg turned her application down the authorities said that Maria von Trapp wasn't the idealised figure presented in the movie, they point to the fact that in her autobiography, Maria von Trapp describes using harsh corporal punishment to discipline her children behaviour that wouldn't be acceptable today, your Highness Python nadir is the spokesman for the city of Salzburg and one hand, there is no doubt of the merits of my ear from pub, especially for salt, on the other hand, if you look into a biography autobiography, you can see if Located for tuptim there was too much violence against, we can't accept this today.

  • So we decided not to, there are a lot of streets in Salzburg, which named after people who may well have used violence, it's quite likely that a lot of people were given corporal punishment.

  • Before the nineteen seventies or eighties, it was considered the normal thing to do.

  • We should look what we are thinking, for them, you all right sieving through teeth out if you now will test on, then the sweets, maybe you wouldn't do it again.

  • This was happy.

  • All this, if your name, a street, you have to look what's what's on today.

  • It's not possible for if Chris on a tour, a raving like funk Malina Vandal thinks it's wrong to judge Maria von Trapp by today's standards, yes, they were horrible things in her, but you have to make a difference.

  • Or think about what was to come and heavy in the twentieth nineteenth eighteenth century, there were famous people, maybe treat their children in that kind of sway like Maria from clubbed us, maybe the Emperor, maybe we don't have know what has happened.

  • The main thing is the film sound of music is a great big thing we have to handle it very sensitive.

  • How do you solve the problem.

  • Night Marie so is Salzburg insulting the memory of Maria von Trapp will simply reflecting the historical reality.

  • It's a sensitive matter city makes a lot Of money from sounded music tourism, this is the beautiful Mirabelle gardens in Salzburg with it Baroque fountain of Pegasus beautiful flowers, and this, of course, is, Maria and the children sang de rein me in the movie and wondering around here, you really get the sensation of just how many people know and love the Association, with the sound of music.

  • Sorry, I just knew I was seeing.

  • I think it would be good to name a street after him much tourism insults for this, because of her, or because after movie about here.

  • So I think, yeah.

  • She should get this Crete.

  • There was a documentary about her there, she was quite a disciplinarian.

  • Yes.

  • Yeah, face fickle thirty.

  • That's why there's a split, do you think, do you think Celso kid name a street, we had some very difficult people who've had streets named after them.

  • So I that report by Bethany Bell, that's all from us.

  • For now, but an updated version of the global news podcast will be available for you to download.

  • Later, if you want to comment on this podcast all the topics covered in it, you can send us an email.

  • The address is global podcast at B.B.C. dot co dot U.K I'm Nick koreshi until next time.

  • Goodbye.