Maria Von Trapp Richard Macgregor David Tang Fidel Castro Kim Jong David Shanghai Tang Maria Lionel Barber Katrina Francis Marcus Bethany Bell Von Trapp Vladimir Putin Tonya Buckley Tanya Buckley Sir David Sergeant Steve Paros Sari Roger Robert Mugabe Prime Minister Theresa Katrina Esau Jean Lee Ince Deena Christian Deena Constitution Japan Chen Yang Celia Hatton Castro Ambassador Robert North Korea Japan China Asia Us South Korea Salzburg Texas Libya Hong Kong Pyongyang Africa Washington Venezuela Us United States South Africa Nepal Taiwan Sudan London England City Of Salzburg City Of Houston Beijing Bangladesh Wha Warrington Wakefield Uk Turkey Tink The Middle East Texans Spain Salzburg City Russia Rihana New Orleans Neville Ned Namur Mozart Mccann Louisiana Kathmandu Javea Jaffa Italy India Houston Hollywood Harris County Guam Geneva Europe Epping Dubai Creon Columbus Britain Bangor

Newshour 2017-08-30:14:00.00
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  • Hello, welcome to news from the b. b. c. world service. it comes to you live from our studios in central London.

  • I'm Brassiere Iqbal, in a moment, we'll discuss the latest rhetoric by the North Korean leader Kim Jong and that his missile test across Japan is just a curtain raiser and would also talk about the impact of the current crisis on the entire post war order in the region.

  • That's our top story today would also look back at the life of entrepreneur and socialite David Tang, he just had friends everywhere, young, old, Royal family Hollywood stars fashion, East, even Fidel Castro and later.

  • How do you solve the problem.

  • No, how do you catch a Canal why Salzburg is struggling with the legacy of Maria von Trapp is she worthy of a street name or not, stay with us for those stories and lots more coming up this hour, we begin with North Korea, where the country's leader Kim Jong un described the firing of a missile over Japan on Tuesday as a curtain raiser and a. meaningful prelude to containing the U.S. Pacific island of Guam these signalling of plans for more launches suggests a pattern of defiance against the joint military exercises, the U.S. and South Korea began last week on Tuesday, the U.N. security Council unanimously condemned Pyongyang firing of that missile over Japan, a statement agreed by China and Russia, described The weapons test as outrageous.

  • Let's see first today from Jean Lee, who is a global fellow with the independent research Wilson centre and who formerly was the associated press Bureau Chief in plumbing, nice Creon knows that the United States has very limited military options, the U.S. does abide by a ceasefire.

  • It was signed in nineteen fifty three to bring the fighting in creamware to an end.

  • So, frankly, the state has very limited military options here.

  • And nice kray knows that's a push things as far as they can no way, he's not her that really strike back what is pushing things as far as they can.

  • What do you think is the most that they can do that will still fall short of the United States engaging with North Korea directly militarily.

  • We are really reaching that went, I think that all these provocations, particularly this latest Nestle large, which threatens the people is nearing that weight, and so that's why you seems to me because, in a region for restraint and really pushing recruited back down, you've lived in North Korea, and you've worked in North Korea, despite its closed and secret nature that most people are aware of what we do know is the huge gap between the population and those in positions of power, what would be your assessment of the way in which ordinary North Koreans, might be reacting to the ramping up of tensions in this way, I should point out That, you know, you, you asked me earlier about press six humps threats in terms of the rhetoric, and one of the things that concerns me is the great, you know how to use that type of rhetoric to justify the building a bespoke a weapon.

  • So this is something that the leader of my crew would be somewhat pleased by, because it gives him more justification tuning tell his people see the U.S. President is threatening to attack us, so I've got four resources into building what they call a treasured sword, that is going to defend us, and so what you may think that people a struggle with a food shortage.

  • They're struggling with our power shortages, but they may question whether it's really wise to be putting all this money into nuclear weapons, but they are at all that there ain't houseroom for opus.

  • It's also a source of pride, frankly, the fact that they can cause this much of a racket and get the U.S. President to address them directly is, frankly, to then something, they're proud, so it is a lot of propaganda on the part of the North Koreans and tried to tell their people.

  • You need to suffer for a bit longer, but this is all going to be to our benefit.

  • In the end, do you think that, in that context, the United States and the West generally just doesn't know, North Korea, well enough in there miss calculating that's definitely one Of the problems you will, it's so hard for us to get into North Korea, so we don't have that many people from the West.

  • On the ground, and then, even when you're there, they do such a good job with the propaganda, but it's very hard to see past it, and certainly for me spending so much time on there.

  • I learned quite a bit, it's, I was explaining to somebody just kind of like peeling an onion there so many layers, and it's so hard to get up.

  • What's real.

  • And that's part of the problem is that we don't understand the country, we don't have any with very little access to them.

  • We it, we're not quite sure what it is they want.

  • We don't have a speech or them.

  • So, even if we were trying to calculate what can you do.

  • Wha, what can you say to try to get them to stop the whole thing.

  • We've got wagons and ballistic pencils, I think we're starting a loss at what it is they want and how to reach them, and had a take away the incentive for building these weapons.

  • Let's turn to South Korea.

  • Do you think the people there in the wake of the missile launch over Japan are much more concerned than they were, South Korea is completely in the firing line.

  • South Korea has been in the firing line.

  • For many, many years.

  • And there was even a top story.

  • Yesterday, and I know that comes as a shark bite sat's for a much more interested in the gossip about King's young uns family and their reports from the intelligence that he had a third child, so they've been living with this threat for so many years, they're almost desensitised to it.

  • So, I have to say that there's no sense of panic here in South creating per cent a piano is far greater in Japan, I think there's a fatalistic sounds as well, the South Queen's understand that they're not the targets, the U.S as the target, here at the U.S is actually, they're the enemy, not the South creams, and so they have a fatalistic sensual, we're not the target of this, and if something will happen, and we would we would die.

  • It's very disconcerting.

  • When you look at the new was here, and get a feel for what it's like on the ground, versus what you see a question headlines outside country.

  • Is it your view that we are really quite close to a tipping point now.

  • Yeah, anything could set off a conflict.

  • If this area is it into parks that sad.

  • This region has been dealing with this for decades now, and so I would like to think, and I hope that the military readers in the region are aware of that, and I'm going to make a false move, I think, a new element, this time, there are two elements, which is the advancement of Crews made in its missile programme and its nuclear weapons, they've accelerated the pace to a point where it really is incredibly dangerous raid every time they test, improving the technology, and certainly yesterday's launch.

  • It was very worrying.

  • And the second element is, frankly, the new U.S. President, there are concerns he missed part of the world, that he may have a gut reaction and issue an order that his military commanders kept ify, and so that I have to say here in South Korea is the bigger concern, we know, North Korea, what they want and how they, yes, fairly predictable, in a sense, but the unpredictability is in washing dinghy, they're well into that mix of unpredictability in Washington and Pyongyang and anxiety elsewhere.

  • Our calls for China, North Korea's closest allies have put more pressure on Pyongyang to pull back from the brink.

  • The British Prime Minister Theresa may, who's in Japan, said as much, today, in response to that the foreign Ministry spokesperson in Beijing, quiet Chen Yang said that calling for trying to do more had become a typical response.

  • Every time the Korean peninsula became tense.

  • She added that those calling for more pressure from China were focusing too much on sanctions, and not enough on peace talks.

  • Meanwhile, some are reflecting on the current crisis as a symptom of a bigger drama on the horizon in East Asia.

  • One of those is Richard MacGregor, who joins us now from Washington.

  • He's the Author of Asia's reckoning, the struggle for global dominance Richard MacGregor, do you think that the dynamics in the region are shifting in the context of the current crisis and shifting and possibly a dangerous way.

  • Absolutely.

  • I mean, to give you the big picture.

  • East Asia.

  • It's been a fantastic economic success.

  • Since the war, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, China, or like it hasn't been a political success.

  • This, he's been papered over by the economics surgeon economic growth.

  • If you think about the Chinese civil war is never been solved.

  • That's, China, Taiwan, the Korean civil war is never been solved signer Japanese tensions are worse now than they've been for decades.

  • And all these kind of frozen in the fifties conflicts are really now, you know, a coming out, and I think the next ten, twenty years are going to be much different from the past, from the past decades.

  • Let's look at Japan, in particular, now, because the our correspondent yesterday were telling us about how people in Japan were clearly freaked out was the word, that he used by this missile going over her Chi do this idea that Japan is studying the possibility of equipping its military with offensive weapons such as cruise missiles, is going to be a big shift if it actually comes to pass, what does that mean for Beijing.

  • Well, basing won't be happy with that.

  • I mean your recall, of course, that after the war, the Americans wrote the Japanese Constitution, for it is the occupying power, they, that was a pacifist Constitution Japan could have no military they could only have self defence forces that's changing now, and that's partly the fault of China and also North Korea, which is kind of the accelerant some Bay is part of a tight group that's the Japanese Prime Minister, is part of a tight group of Japanese Conservatives, who have never like this Constitution always wanted, and they have an independent military again and China and North Korea are doing, are making an argument for him.

  • So we're going to see Japan get offensive weapons, we're going to see them tough their missile defence, and I think it's going to be in the U.K. in East Asia.

  • What do you talk about a new game in East Asia, they're a line just coming out of the un sponsored conference on disarmament in Geneva, the U.S. disarmament Ambassador Robert wood is talking about concerted action by the international Community to pressure North Korea, we've seen sanctions coming out of the U.N., what more does concerted action.

  • Well, the people who can really put pressure on North Korea other Chinese, and they're the ones who don't really want to do it.

  • I mean, the Chinese have every Javea, North Korea, but it's the kind of lead routes that once you use, you lose that North Korea is the China is both an ally and a buffer state in between eight and South Korea are U.S. ally, and China's always calculated, and they still calculate that they'll keep North Korea was a buffer state, rather than let it collapse by tightening the sanctions screws too tightly, and we're still at that point, we're still at that point, but we're also at a point where President trump today has been tweeting, saying that, with with regard to negotiation that talking is not the answer.

  • Again, a sign of ramping up the restaurant, what do you make of that.

  • Well, it's kind of, here we go again with President trump privately.

  • According to Japanese reports, he's talked about talking with North Korea publicly every few weeks or so he delivers the incendiary tweets about, which suggests that he's looking at a military solution, and everybody knows a military solution would be disastrous for South Korea, and probably for Japan as well.

  • So who knows what the administration is really thinking President trump is one thing, his generals are quite another Richard MacGregor writer Richard MacGregor the author of Asia's reckoning, the struggle for global dominance joining us live from Washington.

  • Thanks very much for that later in today's programme, we are going to have an innocence.

  • In a fascinating insight into the social life of sun North Koreans, a report from the South Korean development Institute, giving us new glimpses into some of those people inside that close country who are enjoying their new found entrepreneurship, you're listening to coming up later in today's Programme, we'll hear from Nepal where two weeks of flooding has claimed the lives of more than one hundred thirty people the flood waters have begun receding.

  • No, the river levels going doesn't mean by any stretch of the state relations, the disaster is over.

  • For these people, who have been hit by this onslaught of nature.

  • Stay with us for that, at the headlines this hour from the b. b. c.

  • Newsroom d. u. n. migration Agency says, thousands of Muslims have fled to Bangladesh.

  • In the past few days to escape Burmese military operations.

  • Venezuela's government has been accused by a senior U.N. official have rights abuses, as part of a policy to repress its opponents, and in a special parliamentary session.

  • Spain's Prime Minister has tried to defend himself against accusations of dishonesty over corruption allegations.

  • This is a life from the B.B.C. in London.

  • Now, you may well be among those who have not heard of David tank, who has died at the age of sixty three, he was definitely not a household name around the world, but the reason we're going to reflect on his life.

  • Now is that he certainly made an impact in the worlds in which he moved, high fashion and its corresponding high society, business and politics.

  • So David tank was the founder of the fashion label Shanghai Tang, but he was so much more a bond Yvonne billionaire for one here.

  • He is expanding on success in life as a Technology, entertainment and design, text, talk in twenty thirteen live, no happens, the way, yes, I used to be, how do you make love well tell him, O.K.. as it comes.

  • But when you see something you have to seize it and went, you a presenter with a doesn't matter, don't think of the consequences.

  • Well, among go David Tang's list of occupations.

  • He wrote a column for the financial times newspaper and a little earlier, when I spoke to Lionel Barber, the editor of the F.T. he reflected on his first impressions of him slightly aloof.

  • Oh, very witty, a famous name dropper.

  • A man of immense charm and erudition, and once you've got to know him and saw that the contributions that he had made to Hong Kong culture into and her business, how would, how would you assess him, I think the remarkable thing about David Tang was just how many per surname, he had he was remarkably generous, he was philanthropic, he was a very talented businessman, a bit of a buccaneer.

  • He do.

  • He created Shanghai Tang, the retail outlet.

  • He was involved in the oil business, but he also had an enormous interest and delighted classical music, and he just had friends everywhere, young, old, Royal family Hollywood stars fashion, East, even Fidel Castro.

  • It interesting that you should mention Fidel Castro and Castro died, he actually came on to the world service to talk about his knowledge of him.

  • His Friendship with him, this idea of being able to combine entrepreneurship real dynamism of Hong Kong, but still not shunning entirely the communism of hinterland mainland China.

  • What's interesting about him, wasn't it.

  • Well, he knew which side, their bread was buttered on, shall we say, I mean he saw very early on that China was going to change with dunk shopping's reforms in the late seventies, early eighties, and as a result, he knew he couldn't defend China, but he was a sometimes critic, he was a great defender of Hong Kong, he was obviously born, he was incredibly astute individual reading the political music, but at the same time, he wasn't politically correct.

  • So he would stick by friends.

  • I mean, he would be photographed with Fidel Castro, or even President Robert Mugabe and Vladimir Putin.

  • He was very proud of telling me that tell us about the China Club, because that really was a kind of milestone in the way in which private clubs, not just in Hong Kong, but elsewhere, were kind of manifested themselves.

  • It was quite a unique place.

  • Yes, I actually visited that David's invitation.

  • Earlier this year, when I was in Hong Kong.

  • And I think the thing to remember is that it's not a stuffy place.

  • I mean, there are other places, the old colonial time switch the cigar smoke hangs in the air.

  • If you go to the China Club, it's formal but informal and open tables, sort of boo Face style, very elegant, it's a modern feel, compared to kind of the nineteenth century McCann to lists the merchant class, they would hang out.

  • Do you think that I mean the Tang name is very well known in Hong Kong, but do you think he made an impression well beyond Hong Kong.

  • Well, to a degree, he made it in certain circles, if you, if you mentioned the word, Tang in buffed Palace.

  • I'm sure there'd be a few people like, Oh, yes, but in Hollywood, people would know Tang David Tang people would know Tang in the concert world, I mean he had he knew sopranos conductors, but did the ordinary man in the street in Wakefield, Warrington, no David Tang, no, they didn't, but he certainly was somebody who he was educated in this country.

  • And once he fell ill, he wrote a column in your newspaper about in praise of the national health service, and I should say, I mean he was a great philanthropist, he helped lots and lots of people, and he also appreciated, and we should underline this, he really appreciated England, he came here as a very young boy learnt English pretty well from scratch spoke with a cut glass accent and he appreciated, England, Britain and institutions, amongst them the national health service.

  • I recall just seeing him in hospital, a couple of weeks ago, and, you know, he was well looked after him as well appreciative that the editor Of the financial times newspaper Lionel Barber, reflecting on the life of his friend Sir David tank, who has died, the United Nations says, Venezuela, security forces have committed extensive human rights violations, as part of a deliberate policy to repress political opposition and instil fear in the population.

  • A U.N. report based on interviews with victims, witnesses, lawyers and doctors examined their response to anti government demonstrations in Venezuela, since April, a Geneva correspondent Imogen folks spoke to one of the authors U.N. investigator ever man vowels.

  • We were surprised by the nature and extent of the human race relations.

  • We never imagined fail.

  • Nations would be saw widespread, so we were differences were priced animals.

  • These two sides angry with each other and violence escalated, or was there something more systematic, I don't know if you can character anything to say to angry at each other.

  • I think there is one side, the government with the Mama, put your before us.

  • On the other side, if the population, which wants to express itself, which ones to demonstrate an express its grievances, which should be allowed to demonstrate this should be considered the comment that's an opportunity to engage in Dale, you've interviewed various demonstrators.

  • Some of her, we were detained and someone.

  • What were they telling you about the tree, all the people we interviewed all the leaping, we could not interviews for the thing is because we were in prison.

  • We interviewed their families.

  • Oh yes, they Are systematically complained about the ill treatment during treatment.

  • Men, for example, beatings, he'd meant something's application of electric shock him very sensitive parts of the body, it men also very bad conditions of the tension is this kind of approach, then, do you see it as a deliberate strategy prevent demonstrations to make people just think I want, I am not going to go out and demonstrate definitely, we think that, because of the extent of the motivations and extent of their valuations and the fact that some of them are widespread.

  • Some of them were systematic we think this response to a repressive policy from the government, with the ultimate goal, to stop the demonstration.

  • So it's a government that is not wanting to Brook any opposition.

  • I don't know, I could I could answer that we have documented, it's like your nation's rate of peaceful Assembly and, of course, regulations operator alive for physical integrity.

  • I feed off expression, this seems to indicate that the government that's not want their population to express itself, at least through them and three that was United Nations investigator vile speaking to the b. b. sees Geneva correspondent Imogen effects, you're listening to the B.B.C. world service, this is news, you're listening to a podcast edition of news, our available twice each day, straight after the live edition of the programme.

  • And if you're enjoying this, then why not take a look at other podcast from the B.B.C. world service, the Documentary brings to life stories and investigations from across the globe, or witness remarkable first hand accounts from important moments in history, or try the food chain.

  • Our podcast for foodies farmers and anyone who cares about what they eat and where it comes from coming up next the devastation caused by flooding across South Asia, but first Bangladeshis are now one of the largest migrant groups, making the dangerous crossing over the Mediterranean from Libya to Europe, more than seven thousand Bangladeshis arrived in Italy by sea, between January and may of this year.

  • That's nearly twelve percent of the total number those rescued in the Mediterranean, have told aid workers, they paid more than ten thousand dollars each to be taken from darker to Dubai or Turkey and then onwards to Libya, where they typically fall into the hands of people smugglers, the b. b. c.

  • Sandro image and travelled to the Bangladeshi capital darker to invest, I will say it was in his forties lives in a tiny one room tenement in a, Tarka Shanti.

  • Last year, he left his home for Libya lured by the promise of a good job that I did at the airport at about one hundred one hundred fifty people like everyone was carrying the smaller back, I was told all of us were going to Sudan from their daily diggers to Lydia, we're going to this isn't going to be there, but once he got to Libya, he was sold To traffickers were demanded a ransom of five thousand that Dalai Lama Drago ferry growth, they would torture me, I would not be given any food, it would make me stand for twenty four hours, they said, be in, then you can eventually his wife was forced to borrow money to secure his, he's back home.

  • Now, but deepened his trip to Libya was facilitated by local agent part of a vast trafficking network, who exploit their desperation.

  • One of these she migrants within be Heather I get beard, a Commission off fifty dollars.

  • After many attempts, and finally able to track down an agent who agrees to speak to over a Cup of tea.

  • He tells me his job is to first identify someone who wants to go up.

  • Typically, it's someone he knows documenting air tickets are organised by the traffickers, and then he escorts the migrants, all the way to Libya, typically their journey begins his wretched Gong a Tarka airport, from where they are flown to the Middle East, and then onwards to Sudan and Libya at no point, are they stopped or challenged migration expert and darker University Professor a bra the, re, explains why so many bung dishes migrate, despite the huge risk.

  • One of the main reasons is the number of jobs that have been created at all this much lower than the people who are entering the job market.

  • So migration is a very important livelihood strategy for the pool.

  • So the Immobiliser sources, it'd certainly not necessarily an individual choice.

  • It's an household choice, so the family sits with other decides who should go abroad, how the money should be raised, that will say he tells I ask his wife if she would ever send it to young children abroad.

  • I never send them abroad Neville and that report was from the b. b. c. sanj ointment reporting for us from a darker in Bangor, you're listening to news from the B.B.C..

  • I'm Razia Iqbal, unsurprisingly, there's been a great deal of media attention on one of the biggest storms in American history, resulting in catastrophic flooding, particularly in Houston in Texas, and we will get the latest from there in just a moment.

  • But first, let's go far thousands of miles away from Houston to South Asia, where three countries, India, Bangladesh and Nepal have also been suffering from the aftermath of terrible floods, hundreds of people have died.

  • Let's hear first from Rihana alum who survived the flood Ince and Sari district in the far South East of the part on Friday midnight.

  • He's the flawed scar and destroyed my House in that House, warts and destroy our House towards it.

  • No growth straw, where so just how bad is the current situation.

  • Francis Marcus, he's a spokesman for the international Federation of red cross and red Crescent society's who returned just yesterday from the flood affected region in the South of Nepal, at least one hundred and fifty People are reported dead, just under thirty are still missing unaccounted for a whizz tens of thousands of people displaced from their thousands of houses are destroyed or damaged the flood waters have now begun receding and the river levels are going, but that doesn't mean by any stretch of the nation, but the disaster is over.

  • For these people, who have been hit by this onslaught of nature, because they're still in a very, very difficult and very arduous situation, either in the tented camps under tarpaulin in the hot sun and remaining monsoon rain or having gone back to their homes.

  • What finding the houses caked in mud inside and all their possessions swept away, so people are still in a very, very difficult arduous situation, I suppose we shouldn't forget that this is a country that suffered a devastating earthquake in in twenty fifteen it.

  • Is there a sense that there is still rebuilding being done as a result of that earthquake, and the country is still trying to bring itself back to normal.

  • From then.

  • Yes, absolutely people are still struggling to rebuild their houses and public buildings and other kinds of institutions, or trying to their feet again, which is a very slow process, so you're absolutely right from the perspective of the country as a whole, even though the flood psychic areas, I'm got earthquake areas not extensively overlapping.

  • It's yet another blow.

  • What is this course, one of the world's poorest countries is Certainly, in the West, Frances, there has been a huge amount of coverage of the flooding in the aftermath of the hurricane in a Texas and in Houston, in particular, it is there a sense, there that those events have overshadowed what's going on in Asia.

  • I think the majority of people on the ground here has not really been focused on the disaster that's hit, Texas, because it's very far away from the sphere of preoccupation, but I think, as far as international organisations such as the red cross red Crescent working to support the people hit by the disaster.

  • We very much understand that, don't you.

  • You always going to have conflicting priorities and disasters happening at the same time, but on the other hand, we very much hope that people will not overlooks the desperate need sent in this part of the world, because there are disasters nearer home.

  • What is it that people need more than anything now.

  • Well, the big problems.

  • Now a shelter, of course, with so many tens of thousands of people displaced from their homes, and also the health situation gives rise for not alarm, but concern and attention, with the risk of the spread of diseases.

  • So we very much need to focus on issues, and I'm going to support and in trying to gather more international support.

  • I know very important thing is that so much farmland on so many people's livelihoods have been destroyed by this disaster in what Is really one of the most important agricultural regions of the country, but also, this is an area where the people had been hit by these floods are going to need an awful lot of support in the times, the car Francis Marcus in Kathmandu, were, let's go to the U.S.. now, and tropical storm Harvey, which has moved on to neighbouring Louisiana after battering.

  • The city of Houston in Texas.

  • For the past four days, low lying.

  • New Orleans devastated by hurricane Katrina in two thousand five is bracing itself for possible.

  • Flash floods, more than twenty people have died in Texas and last night, the city of Houston imposed a curfew to deter looting, nearly a third of Harris County, which includes a city is under water, a reporter Neda Taufiq spoke with those trying to cope in Harvey's cope with Harvey's asked them aftermath, the sun may have broken through the dark clouds the Texans are still very much in Harvey's grip it jolly jig rygel back emergency responders spent yet another day, trying to rescue the many, still imprisoned in their homes by the rising water, but among the most urgent pleas for help was to find those still unaccounted for.

  • We have a guy who left last night and never showed up some time this morning with found his vehicle in some sort of these state troopers are searching on a on the outskirts of Columbus, Texas.

  • So we've gone as far as we can By horror at this point, the steeple, they're walking into this point of the road that has it's now filled with flowing water, after almost twenty minutes they return no sign of the guy at all, he's still going to come out somewhere further down the Creek down riot, but at this point, we just don't know you to keep, but it doesn't in Houston, police went on a similar search only from one of their Sergeant Steve Paros drowned after his patrol car took on water, his wife begged him to stay home, but the thirty year veteran of the force was determined to serve his city.

  • Do you was a Swede gentle public servant police Chief had a severe was emotional as he spoke about his colleague, Roger addressed him glad to hear it was too treacherous go on, you can look for, I'm sure I made a decision should leave officers, they're waiting until the morning, because, as much as we want it would cover him last time, I could not put more officers are at risk.

  • Horace wannabe Rick at the recovery mission.

  • There's just, I love you've got to help the buyer you sitting is struggling to provide people with their most basic needs at the city's mean shelter.

  • They were a double their capacity, some evacuees to sleep on there called tile floor, I hate is, I never being in a place like this before.

  • To see this everybody from my neighbourhood.

  • Desk, making Me feel better that they hear that they're not under there water.

  • How does, and we'll go home.

  • I was feeling up, he was there for many, it is an overwhelming feeling of helplessness, Tonya Buckley and her three young children struggled to get to this temporary shelter in keady Texas, only to be told that they will need to be to have a man.

  • She was going to take her with the children in the mouth and the met as a flunk the mattress, the plant of the where the hedgehogs waiting to take her through another Ellen, if you will, it's really devastating it up like a chicken.

  • You can't prove that for you.

  • Keith, no, it doesn't man, what you have in the Bank, it doesn't matter, you have nowhere to go return Tanya Buckley ending that report from Ned a tuffet now some three hundred thousand lovers of the movie, the sound of music, make the pilgrimage annually to the Austrian town of Salzburg where the film is set. film is based on the real life story of Maria, the singing nanny who captured the hearts of the von Trapp family and escaped the Nazis.

  • Now, the Salzburg city counsellor has suggested naming a street after Maria von Trapp hard though it is to believe this didn't already exist, but her application was turned down Bethany Bell reports from Salzburg and wandering along a little footpath and bicycle lane that meanders through the green suburbs Of Salzburg and on my right, I can see the foothills of the Alps that surround the city.

  • This path, doesn't have a name and not long ago, a local politician called my Vandal came up with the idea of naming it after a woman who's done more to put this city on the map than anyone except Mozart Maria von Trapp, I wanted to name the street after an I.V.F. and Club, because she's famous person Salzburg her family's famous insults and very important for salt, but for the country and the city.

  • It's a city of Salzburg turned her application down the authorities said that Maria von Trapp wasn't the idealised figure presented in the movie, they point to the fact that in her autobiography, Maria von Trapp describes using harsh corporal punishment to discipline her children behaviour that wouldn't be acceptable today, your Highness Python Ada is the spokesman for the city of Salzburg.

  • There was too much violence against, we can't accept this today.

  • So we decided not to raimus, it's quite likely that a lot of people were given corporal punishment.

  • Before the nineteen seventies or eighties, it was considered the normal thing to do.

  • We should look what we are thinking, for them, it's not possible for there, Chris, on a tour, a very good, like in a Vandal thinks it's wrong to judge Maria von Trapp by today's standards, yes, they were horrible things in her, but you have to make a Difference or think about what was to come and help in the twentieth nineteenth eighteenth century, they were famous people, maybe treat their children in that kind of sway like Maria from clubbed us, maybe the Emperor, maybe we don't have know what has happened.

  • Mom, so is Salzburg insulting the memory of Maria von Trapp will simply reflecting the historical reality.

  • It's a sensitive matter city makes a lot of money from sounded music tourism wandering around here, you really get the sensation of just how many people know and love the Association, with the sound of music.

  • Sorry, love, I just knew I was seeing.

  • I think it would be good to name a street after him.

  • Tourism in Salzburg is because of her, or because after movie about here.

  • So I think she should get this great do you think Celso name a street, we had some very difficult people who've had streets named after them.

  • So I, and that was Bethany Bell, that's not her singing her, certainly in sending that report tas from Salzburg or listening to news and a reminder of our top story, this hour President trump has declared that talking is not the answer.

  • When it comes to responding to North Korea's missile tests in a tweet.

  • This morning, Richard MacGregor, is the author of Asia's reckoning, the struggle for global dominance.

  • He gave news are his reaction to Presidents, the President's latest tweet privately.

  • According to Japanese reports, he's talked about Talking with North Korea publicly every few weeks or so he delivers the incendiary tweets about, which suggests that he's looking at a military solution, and everybody knows a military solution would be disastrous for South Korea, and probably for Japan as well.

  • So who knows what the administration is really thinking President trump is one thing, his generals are quite another.

  • This is bar with news from the B.B.C. world service.

  • Now it's thought, there are around two thousand languages spoken across the continent of Africa.

  • But globalisation and the legacy of colonialism, have increased concerns that the languages that have held communities together.

  • For centuries, could soon disappear, the b. b.

  • Proms a has spent time with the sun indigenous hunter gatherers, who were the first inhabitants of southern Africa to ask why dying languages should be kept alive with eleven official languages in many more an official ones, so the Africa is unique.

  • More than just a means of communicating language forms any table.

  • Part of the identity of those living here.

  • The northern Cape as the largest province in South Africa, but it's the least populated of this part of the world are Sami ear it, but many years ago, made the perfect home for the indigenous people of this region, the Quasar, but in recent times quiz sign has become a word used to describe two separate groups of people of the coi coi could traditionally worked the Laird as farmers and the Seine, Who were heads to gatherers, while via traditional practices have all bye dad, art, language, as one of the few things that connects them to their past.

  • We, you don't get a gun.

  • There you go.

  • See the most well known of the coil languages is now listen, I'm at that you can see it.

  • There are other parted left the number people splintered and their language.

  • Isn't recognised as one of Africa's official languages.

  • I'm doing, I'm not gonna cuddle on Tink in that basically why, why it's left Sam turning to modern means to keep it alive.

  • Thank you here in the town of spring back Deena Christian presents an hour long radio show and her mother tank, Namur, it's on air, five times a week.

  • And it's the only one of its kind, from the small studio inside the local station number them.

  • She's not as talking to the nearby Community, but actually people in other parts of South Africa, like a. time, and even in the Medea home to more Namur speakers at the bottom, because I was just going clematis for me, so important, so that we can, Oh, big to our forefathers, but, despite her teaching day to day, Deena and the rest of her Community now speak Afrikaans, a language with debts hoots I like when you come in, and they say, you don't speak number, because I don't understand their claim which, my mother taught me in number or us almost all My limbs.

  • A three hours, East of spring back is the town of Epping Tim home to the oldest surviving send language of South Africa, in its survival.

  • Currently wrist on three elderly sisters.

  • Now goonda then punk, then we've got a good plan will did climb aboard were will where no weather chair, and they only spoil, and they had a lot of people's speaking the language.

  • Those were good times.

  • We loved our language.

  • At the age of eighty four Katrina Esau and her sisters are the last speakers of no believed to be the most indigenous language of southern Africa, with no other fluent speakers in the world.

  • Apart from this family, the language has now been recognised by the U.N. as critically endangered also keeping the language alive a sixteen year old Maddie and princely Katrina, as best student when I speak visual inwards.

  • It is really lovely, because my mother's mother, my bib speak this language, it's for the close and communities that connection is at the heart of why they wanted to protect the language, it's more than just in the star Jaffa, a time gone by.

  • It's to ensure a sense of belonging.

  • A shared identity for generations.

  • That report from the B.B.C.'s plums, a salami.

  • Now, let's return to our top story, the tension between the U.S. and its allies, and North Korea, President trump has treated this morning that talking, as he put it, is not the answer.

  • That was In response to choose it Tuesdays development, North Korea's hurling a ballistic missile over Japan, calling at the first step of military operations in the Pacific.

  • He had at the beginning of news.

  • What North Korea's might be thinking about this turn of events, but what is life actually like in North Korea.

  • There's an intriguing report out today about the lives of some North Koreans, who live in the country's major cities, Celia Hatton is from our Asia Desk, it's a fascinating glimpse into the lives of some of the North Korea's twenty five million people, Kim Jong un has really lifted the lid on private entrepreneurship in North Korea, and that means that some people have more money in their pockets.

  • And they're looking for places to spend this money, and some of their spare time and Pyongyang and some other major cities are a building facilities to accommodate that, so we were seeing a rise in ice skating rinks roller skating rinks, movie theatres, fitness centres, even twenty four hour restaurants, you've had for size that this applies to some people, because our input impressions of the country, from the outside, very secretive society very close society is that it's a very poor country, that's right, but that is a very poor country, we, we can't forget that North Korea's facing drought about seventy per cent of the people there has faced some kind of food insecurity.

  • They are looking at the possibility of of going hungry.

  • But this is a country, like many others, where there is a widening gap between the rich and the poor, the rich in North Korea's cities are learning to spend money, and many of them about forty percent are engaged in private entrepreneurship and, yes, we have the poor outside of those cities, one line in this report says that, you know, when I travelled first travelled into Pyongyang, it looked like a dream.

  • To me, this was referencing someone who'd lived in the countryside.

  • For most of his life, so it was really interesting glimpse into what is going on in North Korea.

  • This widening gap.

  • What are we to make of the perspective of this report, who's issued it.

  • This is written by the tree, or development Institute at the South Korean state funded Institute, and they are really give us the best glimpse of what's going on with North Korea's economy, for example, they look at satellite pictures to see the size of private markets across North Korea, so that we can understand how much of the economy is his private how much his public and also it river because North Korea doesn't issue with own economic information.

  • So we're reliant on an Institute, like their career development Institute to tell us more.

  • But, in a way, what this does is not just tell us about economics, it tells us about the society.

  • Exactly.

  • I mean, some really interesting personal glimpses in this report.

  • For example, It news from some of our North Korea's border towns where one defector is quoted saying ice, a private bookshelves and some people's homes were people were reading detective novels and novels, like gone with the wind, under the covers at night.

  • Our Asia editor sillier hat, and then just to bring you right up to date.

  • In the last few minutes, the U.S. Secretary of defence Jim mattis has said that there was still room for diplomacy in dealing with North Korea after President trump said in that tweet that negotiations were not the answer.

  • We're never out of diplomatic solutions.

  • Jim masses said as he went into a meeting with the South Korean defence Minister, that's it.

  • For this edition of the programme.

  • Thanks for your company.

  • This past hour for me, Razz it.

  • So the next time, bye bye has been a download from the B.B.C. to discover more and our terms of use with it, b. b. c. dot com slash podcast.