Jeremy Corbin Theresa Jonathan Walker James Shaw Tom Simons Dame Judith Hackett Shanghai Tang Scottish Parliament Scottish Richard Leonard Richard Phil Winnie Neil Naomi Davis Naomi Davies Martha Kearney Martha Laura Mcintyre Kim Jong Jeremy Corbin Dylan Jeremy Helen Gretchen Helen Gresham David Tang David Cameron Dame Judith Hackett Chris Mason Theresa Chris Aldridge Chris Bay Theresa Aston Martin Anna Walker Anna Sarwar Alick Alec Roly Japan Uk Myanmar Scotland Bangladesh Manchester Tokyo London Dugdale Europe China United Kingdom Uk Sunderland Leeds England Burma Yorkshire York Winnie Skye Peru Paris North Korea North East India Louisiana Juma Javid Jame Hong Kong Holdsworth Hampshire Gus Glasgow Edinburgh Brussels Britain Breck Bozo Beijing Barra Asia Archie Angus

World At One 2017-08-30:12:45.00
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  • Thank you for downloading this podcast of the world at one from B.B.C. radio four, the world at one, this is Martha Kearney with forty five minutes of news and comment Theresa may has begun.

  • Her visit to Japan by insisting that the U.K.'s strong trading partnership with Tokyo will continue pro sprigs it, we've seen soft Bank, this Toyota investing in the U.K. since the referendum vote took place.

  • These are important developments for our economy and for their relationship with Japan, but could jobs in Japanese companies here.

  • Be lost.

  • Once we leave the E.U.. from Friday parents and England, should be able to claim thirty hours of free child care, but can the system cope.

  • We know there are still parents having difficulties for my nurseries, we have some who are still waiting, one of our parents are spent nine hours.

  • Now on the phone, including one and a half hours on hold, and she still has no code aid workers have warned that, eighteen thousand Muslims have fled violence in Myanmar and crossed into Bangladesh.

  • In the last week, we'll hear from the border Scottish labour is beginning the hunt for his fourth leader, and three years after kezia Dugdale ze resignation and three months on from the Manchester bombing.

  • One of the surgeons involved in treating the injured children tells us about lessons for the N.H.S.. we've learnt a lot.

  • I think there's a lot More we can do, and we've shown how a service can be, and it needs to how we wanted to be like that all the time, b.

  • B.B.C. news is read by Chris Aldridge Theresa may has begun.

  • Her visit to Japan by saying a trade deal between Tokyo and Brussels, could be the basis of a future post Brecht's at agreement between the U.K. and Japan, missus may highlighted the investment in Britain, announced by firms, including this Toyota, since the vote to leave the E.U.. as examples of the very strong relationship between the two countries.

  • A day after North career fired a missile over Japan.

  • She also called on China to do more to curb your gang's weapons tests.

  • Here's our political correspondent Chris Mason Theresa may flew into a saka this morning acutely aware of the context in which she makes her first visit to Japan, as Prime Minister, just one day on from arguably, North Korea's most provocative missile test yet missus may told reporters travelling with her Yon Yang's actions were outrageous, but her suggestion that Beijing should step up, it's pressure on Kim Jong on appeared to be dismissed by China's foreign Ministry a spokesman told the B.B.C. just chanting about sanctions is not going to do much, as well as discussing security with her Japanese opposite number, Sinn seo Arbie the Prime Minister will also talk to him about a post Brecht's it trade deal.

  • The Japanese government has publicly expressed its Unease about the U.K.'s departure from the European Union, but Downing street hopes and e. you Japan trade deal currently being negotiated can form the basis of a direct deal between London and Tokyo, the international organisation for migration in Bangladesh, says more than eighteen thousand of Muslims have fled across the border from Myanmar, formerly known as Burma in less than a week, one of many ethnic minorities in Myanmar.

  • They've been in the region for generations, but the Burmese view them as illegal immigrants, and they don't have citizenship rights are South Asia editor Juma gibbering reports exact numbers are hard to confirm, but the refugees are clearly arriving in their thousands some carry clothing or cooking pots, most have nothing aid workers sound overwhelmed.

  • There were hinges, who have long complained about persecution in Myanmar, or fleeing afresh crackdown by the security forces.

  • That was a response to militant attacks on thirty police stations.

  • Last Friday, carried out by a hinge insurgent group which surfaced last year, the United Nations has called on me and Marta safeguard civilians and on Bangladesh to allow refugees to cross the border officially Bangladesh denies them entry and thousands are trapped in a no man's land between the two countries, but many are making it through leading aid workers to call this, one of the world's forgotten crises tropical storm Harvey waitress cause devastating flooding in Texas, before drifting back out to sea has made landfall again over the neighbouring state Of Louisiana in Houston, more than twenty people are now known to have died record rain has left large parts of the city.

  • Under water.

  • A curfew has been imposed to deter looters Scottish labour has said that its current Deputy Alec Roly will take the helm of the party until he decides on a new leader, it follows kezia Dugdale surprise resignation from the role was Dugdale insisted, she hadn't been pushed out by supporters of Jeremy Corbin whose leadership.

  • She has previously opposed Jame sure reports from Glasgow, there's no question that some supporters have Jeremy Corbin still resent kezia Dugdale ze previous opposition to him.

  • Recently, she's been more supportive, but has continued to exercise her writers, the leader of Scottish labour to disagree with him.

  • Changes in her personal life may also have influence her decision her close friend died earlier this year, and she's recently begun a new relationship with an S.N.P. Member of the Scottish Parliament, the party's Deputy leader Alick rally takes on the leadership until an election can be held, he might turn out to be a candidate for the full time job alongside Richard Leonard also on the left of the party and the boar centrist Anna Sarwar the leadership campaign could easily shape up was a contest between supporters of Jeremy Corbin and those who oppose him, the United Nations as accused the Venezuelan authorities of committing extensive human rights violations, as part of a deliberate policy of repressing political Opposition.

  • A U.N. report based on interviews with victims, witnesses, lawyers and doctors, examined the anti government demonstrations there since April, it found the systematic use of excessive force, as well as arbitrary detention of protesters, the chair of the independent inquiry into building regulations, following the disaster Granville Tower, so she believes it is inevitable.

  • There are failings in the system, Dame Judith Hackett has promised to produce an interim report by Christmas and her final conclusions by next spring.

  • Here's our home Affairs correspondent Tom Simons Dame Judith Hackett, he's an engineer and a former chair of the body which enforces, health and safety laws, she's announced her review will examine the current system of safety regulations and consider how it's being applied to the construction and refurbishment of buildings, the emphasis is on tall buildings like grin full Tower, she'll report to the Community Secretary said, Javid and the home Secretary amber Rudd, she'll feed her conclusions into the ground for fire public enquiry at the outset, she said.

  • The fact that so many buildings have failed government fire tests showed there were shortcomings in the system of regulations.

  • It's not just about what's written down, she said, it's about how it's applied in practice.

  • The Hong Kong, entrepreneur and socialite Sir David Tang has died at the age of sixty three, he was the founder of the international fashion brand Shanghai Tang, which he later sold and the China clubs.

  • He also wrote a popular agony Uncle column in the financial times.

  • The first episode of the great British bake off to be screened on channel four attracted six and a half million viewers last night.

  • It's the channel's biggest audience.

  • Since the opening ceremony of the Paralympics in twenty twelve, Chris.

  • Thank you.

  • The Japanese tea ceremony is an elaborate ritual with complex symbolism, but designed to create peace and harmony.

  • Something that Teresa may no doubt appreciated as she began her visit to Japan.

  • Today, and the fraught business of trying to agree a trade deal, the Prime Minister arrived with a business delegation for talks aimed at easing the Japanese corporate world's worries about bricks it before meeting the Prime Minister shins and Bay Theresa may said that recent Japanese investment in the U.K set an important marker for a continuing relationship.

  • Japan is a long standing partner of the United Kingdom, significant investments from the U.K. into Japan and from Japan, into the United Kingdom.

  • We have seen soft Bank Nissan Toyota investing in the U.K. since the referendum vote took place as part of the visit here today.

  • Five hundred million Pounds Aston Martin deal.

  • These are important developments for our economy and for the relationship with more than one hundred sixty six thousand people work for Japanese companies in the U.K., well, I'm joined now by our business correspondent Jonty bloom, and Jonty, what are the indications about the prospect of a new trade deal with Japan will be Indications are that Japan is keen to have a free trade deal with us, but not immediately.

  • And that's because, in part, to, they are coming to the end of negotiating a free trade deal with the E.U., which includes us, and that's top of their list, and also until Japan in lots of other countries know what the terms of Breck's it sitar I.E. what our access to E.U. markets.

  • He's going to be what regulations will be followed, we have access, without tariffs.

  • All these kind of factors, they are unlikely to start seriously negotiating a free trade deal with us, because that would affect any any negotiations going Theresa may said today that she thought that the U.K. could, in a way, piggy back on to the deal that the E.U. signing with Japan is that feasible.

  • Well, it is feasible, but it does leave you and rather strange position, because you have up until the exit, which is going to be twenty nineteen, there may be a transitional deal, and then basically we try to renegotiate exactly the same deal.

  • We have with Japan.

  • At the moment, as she then goes on to say that we want, we have that deal, we could try and improve it and get a better agreement with Japan and other countries, but we are basically talking about first thing we do after Breck said is renegotiating the free trade deals.

  • We already have, through our membership of the E.U., and That does put back the prospects of any improvement in free trade rather a few years.

  • Why is this so important to the U.K. economy.

  • Well, as we heard from Japan has invested heavily in the U.K., in fact, half of all its inward investment into the E.U. has come to the U.K. in an Inn in the past decades, and one of the principal reasons for that is because we're in the European Union, and therefore we had access rulers Japanese goods produced here into the youth, so that's very important.

  • They employ a lot of people.

  • They also very efficient companies, and therefore the increased the productivity, not only the factories, they open here bit of the suppliers who are based here as large knock on effect, they employ hundreds of thousands of people, and that is also, we know worrying Japan because they came up with a paper last year, saying, we are worried about this, because so many of our company's based themselves in the U.K. because of access to the y. you, we need to know what after breaks.

  • It is the arrangements that access to you after, then, Jonty, thank you.

  • Let's hear from one of the areas which particular benefits from Japanese investment, Jonathan Walker is from the North East, chambers of commerce, he's area includes the Nissen plant in Sunderland in North East India, which employs seven thousand people, that's the plant.

  • There's a lot of people have heard of, but how Many jobs in total.

  • Would you say, rely on Japanese investment in the North East good afternoon mother des tens of thousands of jobs right across the North East, and they're tired, they're depend directly on our Japanese investment or are stimulated by it.

  • By the presence of big name companies such as this are a touchy, so what do you think of when we hear about the kind of the difficulties that the U.K. could face over negotiating a new trade deal that the priority for Japan.

  • At the moment, seems to be the agreement that he's talking about with the, as I've just said, the northeast enjoys a strong relationship with Japan in terms of trade, but if, particularly in terms of foreign direct investment.

  • I trade deals and important part of that relationship, and absolutely the government's right to be pushing out and putting some pressure on to make that happen, but it was going to be part of what should be a much deeper relationship and the P.M. should really be over there.

  • At the moment, advocating on behalf of regions, such as the North East, Jonty's just mentioned, we're a very productive for a very strong and skilled workforce.

  • And that's part of what attracts us what happened to jobs in the North East, he future Japanese investment goes elsewhere.

  • It's a huge part of our economy, but we believe we've got a very strong, yeah, I am m.

  • What do, regardless of whether operates.

  • It was taking place, we've got the most productive castle actor in Europe, a nest you touch you followed suit.

  • Investing in a you train manufacturing facility in the North East, it's very difficult to, and they've come here, because that works or strong, it's productive, and we've got a strong track record, of course, we need access to European markets.

  • It's also want to say that to at as part of a bedsit deal, but we think we've got a very compelling but investors.

  • So what accompanies your members saying tune about breaks it, and in particular any transition deal, the majority of sounds that we speak to me, particularly exporters d'You want to maintain an element to this as the status quo, but ultimately, that means bureaucratic section.

  • That's access to the European market.

  • Any final deal will be judged on its merits, but essence actors as cross and, but I want to be able to move their goods into Europe in a relatively low cost and relatively bureaucratic and do you think there's a prospect of if the deal isn't done that some companies may choose to invest elsewhere.

  • Those decisions are for individual companies.

  • I think it's up to the government, not only to secure a good bread to Dale that achieves I just our lives, but to be out there, knocking on doors or softly my to debts.

  • I'm really up for getting on behalf of regions, such as the North East, the sink, Why we have such a gutless to commandeer business and, regardless of what happens in the bags and gushy actions, because, of course, Nissan increased investment after Becks absolutely dead, the Nissan factory is surely one of the jewels in our Crown success at you sacked actress.

  • It's the most productive car plant in Europe, investment continues to go up there, and that's because the workforce in Sunderland is his loyal, it's productive, and it does a good job than her son Jonathan Walker, many thanks all squelch squelch children enjoying themselves in a nursery sandpit.

  • But some of their parents may not be quite so happy a scheme to give free childcare, which has been a central policy of David Cameron's twenty fifteen election campaign has been hit by ed Minister of problems and criticism about her lack of spaces.

  • It's the last full day for parents in England to apply for thirty hours of free childcare for their three and four year olds for the autumn term yesterday, the Department of education told the times from his half of parents found eligible for thirty hours of free childcare had yet to find a nursery place.

  • Others have had technical problems getting the right code Helen Gretchen runs three nurseries in Yorkshire, we have many parents who've got very concerned, and throughout the course of the last couple of months, because they could not get their eligibility codes, which is the eleven digit number, they need, so that we Can process their funding claim with the local authority.

  • So now we're down to the last couple of days, we know there are still parents having difficulties for me and for my nurseries, we have some who are still waiting one of a pair have spent nine hours.

  • Now on the phone, including one and a half hours on hold.

  • There has been an error placed on her form, and they told her they forgot to send for the trials reference number, and she still has no code, I find it very interesting that yesterday with two days to go there was a letter sent to local authorities, from the Director of early years with the D.F.C. announcing that they can issue a temporary coded to those parents who are having difficulty, it will only last, the term, but they hope that by then the system will be sorted out, and the parents will be on to the normal coats, so we also know that up to this week.

  • Fifty six percent of these validity codes had been processed through this eligibility tracking system.

  • Fifty six percent is an awful long way from one hundred per cent.

  • So really, we don't quite know where the pockets of trouble are, whether they are pockets, or whether it's a general issue across, we know that this four Pounds and now that we're getting across many of the local authorities, just doesn't cover our have a carer for my cannon, says the funding Includes an extra billion Pounds a year to pay for the free offers, and they're raising the national hourly rate to four Pounds.

  • Ninety four, we are not getting anything like that.

  • We're talking about four pound an hour mark for York and a little more for Leeds that isn't the centre of Irish at the centre r. issue is that we are completely being drowned out by government spokespersons by the government, Minister, who is querying why we are making additional charges.

  • Now, additional charges are what we are trying to do in order to make sure our businesses are sustainable.

  • For instance, half my work force are at degree level and a bath.

  • We have online learning channel system, so that their parents can also communicate and send us observations of their children outside of nursery hours it, we are doing something, the parents want, and it cannot be delivered on four Pounds an hour, it's ludicrous Helen Gresham and on the line from Hampshire is even wort and the demands of this new thirty hours offer had a bin pack it bit big impact, didn't it on your own nursery, it's her decision.

  • Why did you have to do that.

  • Well, I did my mind when I looked it.

  • I mean when when all this very ill thought out election about winning peg came out in April, I started looking at it and thinking how on earth can we offer it because we with, and You know that this voluntary system that they're trying to suggest how can any business you run with with voluntary taken being paid.

  • And what did they ask for it back you, it's just totally ill thought out the whole government press lager Anna Walker, we're talking to death.

  • It is to be teething problems.

  • And, as a new policy.

  • A lot of people are sated by Adam in the government's aid is putting in more money.

  • Well, this is certainly not enough to cover my costs and annihilated more actually school, so I had eighteen children per session, but a very high staff ratio.

  • I, but, you know, I believe that my government funding went down in April for a four pound forty four an hour to all point of thirty six and my hourly cost per child per hour, with a bechic basic about sycophantic, whereas before with us, just the fifteen hour by at least had some additional laugh.

  • What I could make up the difference.

  • But now I hadn't, you know, I have nothing to say, and changed it from the free trip funded, we'll have to leave it there.

  • Eve work.

  • Thank you, we did ask to speak to part with education, but no one was available within the past few minutes, we've had a statement from h.m.r.c. saying they're sorry for the difficulties.

  • Some parents have experience accessing the service and urged anyone having problems to call the helpline and the number, there is, Oh, three hundred, one, two, three, four, zero nine seven, Oh, three hundred, one, two, three, four, zero nine seven coming up in the programme, we hear from the surgeon who treated many of the children caught up in the Manchester bomb attack three months ago, and she thinks the N.H.S. can benefit from the experience when Angus and sue cheese party took power from the generals in Myanmar, which used to be known as Burma, there were hopes that would end repression in the country, but one minority group would dispute that there's been a mass exodus of a hint a Rick Inga Muslims eighteen thousand have fled across the border into Bangladesh in less than a week.

  • Aid workers, giving emergency shelter and food.

  • So there's about a dozen of the new arrivals have recent bullet wounds, the latest crisis erupted after Ringo insurgents attacked thirty police stations.

  • Last Friday, triggering a military response, near Saint beer from the b. b. c.

  • Bengali service reports from Bangladesh's border with Myanmar girls have farmed here since last Friday, most of them under cover of darkness, I met some running goes in a border, it Bergkamp beside the Naafi, were, indeed, now the price.

  • Very, very small ports and work hard by the border guards of lung and asked if I remarks that order between Bangladesh and Myanmar running cos they're a small Muslim minority from Myanmar struck hang stood all daughter lived there for generations, Myanmar, or government denies Them citizenship, claiming they're illegal immigrants from Bangladesh.

  • Many of the board.

  • There are small children, this people bought with the heart if it memory off Burren homes and lost family members, they're shooting at us, without any reason, they're burning our homes.

  • Every day, those who are not able to flee are being locked inside homes, and they're setting those homes on fire.

  • They're shooting at people from the distance and killing them.

  • If they can give that a good, I'm of the only the if we returned, they will kill us.

  • Yesterday, the military shot at a boat and sank it, the boat was carrying elderly people, women and children, we cannot return.

  • But even in the hardship, the first to reach gun malicious draw if I want to stay here for long.

  • If the airport, there sent, despite the high alert border guards pulse them soft, then managed just making in the border guard wrong with her, she's gone running off his left hand corner Laurie fullest fullest, they'd understand this people, our theme from violence, but they have a strict instructions not to allow any Myanmar nationals into ballet dish normally depict the duck, I was said, be fake across supplying, but also in the daytime bid there some attempts to cross, because, you know, the route of the river here in there is little more than in the not so normal in there, not more with the books.

  • Here also, they try would be, it's Almost impossible to see what's happening under a Panofsky just across than a fever, but stuff's more can be seen, and the floor is virtually a stateless people have become a family, the incident for people in the Bozo who he and Gus have been coming here for decades.

  • Last year, a similar cried down by the security forces cost more than seventy pulse and robbing us predictions during my dish, almost all of them are still living here near Sir beer from the b. b. c.

  • Bengali service, how can you be sure that you're vulnerable relative is paying the right amount for utilities like gas, electricity in the Internet.

  • One woman has raise concerns after she discovered her elderly uncle was paying over one hundred Pounds a month for a sky subscription, he lives alone, and was diagnosed with Alzheimer's.

  • Two years ago, she says.

  • He didn't realise the amount he was pain was relatively high sky's apologised for the inconvenience.

  • Shakespeare's trying to access her uncle's account details and said, they'd be in touch to ensure her uncle is on the best package for his needs.

  • Let's talk now to, rachel Holdsworth she was on helping her uncle with her finances and also to Phil Winnie, he's from the charity age, U.K.. so, rachel, just explain to us what happened with sky.

  • It wasn't a question of him being mis sold was it.

  • No, it wasn't that was our first thought wee my mum recently got access To his Bank account as a joint account holder.

  • We've been considering power of Attorney, but he didn't understand that so wasn't able to consent, but he did understand, you know, I did my mum to his Bank accounts.

  • That's what we've done, and when we saw that he was paying one hundred and ten Pounds a month off first thought was this, this must be in the selling, he must have if you've been sold broadband, he doesn't have a computer, maybe, maybe that's what's happened.

  • So we try to get hold of Skye to find, you know, just just in theory, what this could possibly be.

  • And that leads to sky on inviting others to give hit give his address, phone number, and they said, their name and address to access to account.

  • And then, of course, we hit the data protection issues.

  • Without the camper account password.

  • We couldn't find anything out, and it was, we don't know.

  • He doesn't know is sure, but it was a lot of, I was a lot of other things.

  • You found as well, like utility company, yes, he's paying one hundred and twenty Pounds a month for his energy to two separate companies, gas and electricity, which I don't wear assuming because we haven't managed to access that those accounts either were assuming these are legacy tariffs, possibly from privatisation, he will never have queried, then he'll just like with the sky account, we we told he knew what he Was playing, but he thought that was normal.

  • Let's bring in the film, away from age U.K. how common is this kind of problem.

  • Well, this is certainly not an isolated incident, we see stuff like that's happening quite often, not only in telecoms, but also energy insurance, and it's a lot of cases of people who sort of so called, loyal customers being charged excessive prices.

  • And, in some cases, for products that they don't even want or need, but I suppose the companies involved will be very careful about data protection, and they don't want anybody to be able to access accounts.

  • Is there a way around this.

  • Well, I mean, ultimately, companies have a responsibility to treat all the customers fairly, but especially those who might be considered vulnerable in some way.

  • So among older people, this could be people living with dementia, living with other health conditions, people who are recently, Bereaved, a lot of older people are still not online, so those certain situations that can make it really hard for people to know, are they on a good price.

  • Fair price.

  • Getting the products that they want, and companies must really try hard to make sure that are treating those customers fairly Richard from your perspective, what could be done to make it easier for you to help your uncle with his finances.

  • I think I'm a flexible attitude to helping other people access to the account.

  • I think eventually, I have to give Sky, the fed you eventually they did bend over backwards to help, we were able to prove that we had a lot of information, we have access to his Bank accounts.

  • Once we could prove that we weren't, you know, horrific fraudsters, they did, they did help us, and they have now halved his bells, we haven't even attempted to access any any other of the counts.

  • I'm going up, I live in London, I'm going up to Leeds in about a month to sit with him.

  • And so he can prove his identity, just some flexibility in helping carers protect those vulnerable adults would be, I think, would go a long, long way and film Owen, we had that, rachel, wasn't able to get power of Attorney and I was her mother and for her uncle, but is that something you'd advise families to look into what we would certainly encourage families to look into it to consider it, you can get information on power of Attorney from us.

  • It's U.K. can contact the Office of the public guardian, it can help in these situations where you want someone to help manage their finances, but it is for people to make that decision themselves Winnie ritual Holdsworth thank you did she go of her own accord or was she pushed there are many questions surrounding the surprising resignation of kezia Dugdale the leader of the Scottish labour party, it's nowt to begin the search for its fourth Leader in less than three years.

  • It was no secret, there were tensions between her and Jeremy Corbin cos it Dugdale had said publicly that he couldn't do his job, but in an interview in the past in since her resignation, she denied that this was the reason for leaving so suddenly the labour party in Scotland was in terrible trouble.

  • When I took over as leader, are two and a half years ago we had fallen from forty one to just one m. p. in, there was a lot of work to be done, and I've devoted every waking moment of my life to that task.

  • Over the last two and a half years, and I believe I have made a lot of progress were back competing again the part ready for the future, but I have to pass that back and onto the next person to take on the next stage of this journey.

  • Last week I met cos it Dugdale on the Royal mile in Edinburgh, and there were no science.

  • Then she was contemplating, leaving the job, but one of her remarks in our interview may have exacerbated the tensions with Jeremy Corbin how hard is it for you to formulate a different message on breaks it, given what Jeremy Corbin, saying, I mean, for example, take immigration use mooted the idea of having local immigration levels for Scotland.

  • He's absolutely ruled that out.

  • I have a different experience of what he's had to see in The past about immigration, I think, is very open to that makes it, how would that work, then you'd have people who would apply for jobs in Scotland, what would then stop them from wanting to come.

  • Further down to come down South to London, where perhaps way, just lots of different models, and you can have regional approach to immigration.

  • You can do it based and employees or employers or in sectors where they might be particular challenges.

  • I'm not prescribing one particular way of how this should be done.

  • I'm seeing.

  • It's a conversation that we should have as a country of the times reports.

  • So when Jeremy called, and was asked if he was open to Scotland.

  • Having a separate immigration policy is cos it have suggested.

  • He said, I think that was a bit of excited reporting going on there.

  • What I said was, I recognise the demands of the labour market in Scotland.

  • Well, a Scotland correspondent is James Shaw, and let's begin with, is it a stated reasons for leaving what her, she said, well, essentially, I think it boils down to two things, Martha, on the one hand, the personal and, on the other hand, the political, it's only been two years, but it's been a really torrid two years, four elections, one referendum, and at one point in the electoral cycle, it looked as though labour was going to be crushed really under the heel of the S.N.P. so bad was the Position for them.

  • Of course, they came back after the last election, and you have seven M.P.s in Scotland, but, after all, that you can imagine that it might have been a pretty exhausting experience for her.

  • And then on the personal side, she lost a very close friend earlier on this year.

  • She's in a new relationship, in fact, with a Member of the Scottish Parliament, who's also in the S.N.P. and nationalist, so perhaps the way she describes it that combination, it's been enough for her to make the decision that she's going to go in her own time, it's fair to say that there is tension behind the scenes between Jeremy Corbin Dylan.

  • He was visiting Scotland last week.

  • Yes, we did hear these rumours.

  • Unfortunately, the sauce is not necessarily the best from it in terms of rumours about Scottish labour, it comes from an M.S.P. for the S.N.P. for the nationalist Neil grey, you said he's heard rumours coming out of Scottish labour that there was this confrontation.

  • He says he doesn't know whether it's true or not.

  • And it may have happened, but we haven't absolutely definitive evidence that this went on, but of course, there are those disagreements, I suppose, getting a doctor would say, as the leader of Scottish labour, which, in many ways, as an autonomous party.

  • She's entitled to have a different view from the leader of the U.K. party James Shaw.

  • Thank you.

  • Laura McIntyre, one of the teenagers Who are seriously injured in the Manchester bomb attack has been flown back to her home, the Hebridean island of Barra her parents have been paying tribute to the doctors and nurses who looked after her in all twenty two people, including children died two hundred fifty were injured victims were taken to eight hospitals around the city.

  • Among those thirteen children were rushed to Royal Manchester children's hospital Naomi Davis, he's a consultant children's orthopaedic surgeon, she was on duty during the attack.

  • She's also the clinical lead for the North West children's major trauma unit, and has been involved in the treatment of those who came to the hospital.

  • Ever since I asked her, her colleagues were trained to deal with an event like this, what happened after Paris, which we started looking at some of the longer term scenario.

  • So we started thinking about what would it be like if we had a lot of patients in four long weeks only did surgery, still needed care how with the hospital function around maintain its normal day today, function.

  • So what we've got what we would call, business as usual, and we done a lot of thinking about that, and last eighteen months.

  • So we had a number of potential solutions to the problem in a hat and six weeks before the arena attack, we'd actually done a table top exercise to look at that as well.

  • So it's all fresh in people's minds as to what a Potential action plan would be, when did you first become aware of the arena attack.

  • So they were say, don't keep your phone by your bad, we have what's up group for the orthopaedic Department and the message came through on that my colleague on call said that they've been notified of the attack, and could people come in and, at the same time out, she got a notification through, so it's sort of it's of a natural reaction, you get up, get out and go, Oh, I remember my husband phoned me on the way to work.

  • I know it's real.

  • It's real.

  • I'm going, of course, it's real, but it was, I think that level of disbelief that it would happen, but we've been saying that it would and could, for a long time, and we have been saying, we need to consider children, a nurse, I don't think we'd ever considered previously properly.

  • Large numbers of children, and this is what we've been doing more recently, so that we weren't just looking, I don't care, which a lot of the other attacks had been that we actually had a plan together for children as well, that was important.

  • I'm guessing that muster, and one of the hardest things about dealing with the victims, the attacked the fact that there were so many children.

  • Yes, I think it's a realisation later on.

  • Arthur's in a realisation at the time, so I walked into through the door.

  • Actually around Midnight.

  • There were a lot of my colleagues there.

  • A lot of people that I'd done a lot of this work with which was lovely.

  • So, I knew I had we had a great team, but it was very calm.

  • It was only later on, I realised that, as I walked in, in fact, they'd already dealt with the death in the Department that must have incredibly challenging for for those people that are coming on working through, but they did, and I've seen the best of the N.H.S. actually over that night in the following weeks.

  • What was your role, we discussed some of the methods that known to the military, so some of the training that they do in terms of having the command of the situation, so that I knew I wasn't going in to operate that Archie you need people outside making some of the decisions about, he's going to theatre, who's going to intensive care unit in a what order of people are going into theatre.

  • And, in fact, it takes some experience.

  • To do that, and so I was outside and trying to do more, the coordination, what was the kind of cases that were first arriving at the hospital.

  • They were shrapnel type interest, so we were dealing with children who'd had trouble in various parts of their bodies, and some of the families came in with them as well.

  • So we had some parents admitted into the paediatric Department as well to Keep them together, and we were able to keep them together.

  • Over the subsequent weeks, who, with them on the ward as well.

  • We're in a good position to be able to do that.

  • So largely limb injuries open fractures wound some more serious injuries head torso, what kind of things with children, saying to when they were admitted actually was quite quiet.

  • They were saying, very little, and that was the other thing around that atmosphere in paediatric emergency Department.

  • It was the children were quite quiet, Peru, only answering questions.

  • When you asked them, and it was so.

  • Not a lot of conversation going on, because they were even see Sean must have, yeah, I mean looking back, and what do you say in that situation.

  • Do you, I think they were accepting of the cow that was coming to them grateful for it, but just yes, quiet and waiting.

  • If you remember, one of the very difficult things about this awful attack was the way that family's got separated, and they weren't sure where children were doing was so bewildering children don't tend to have normal identify certain adult carriers with them.

  • So it is, it is more challenging.

  • And, in fact, one of the positive roles of social meter, I think, was actually enabling people to be joined up and find each other again.

  • They were a couple that didn't quite find their way as fast as we would have liked to, and I'm sure it Felt like days and days, but in fact, it wasn't, it was, it was a few hours, and we, and we've got them.

  • But what kind of professional challenges.

  • Are there in treating wounds like this of me wounds that you would hope never to come across really in the course of your they are unusual for us.

  • We don't come across a lot of blister clincher is in civilian life.

  • Thankfully, and I hope never again in this number, we are different from the London attacks, because they were the worst type of road traffic accident, to a certain extent, in this was, this is very different.

  • This was ballistics we had advice from ballistics experts, so that we know things about how to manage the wound, so that we don't close them straightaway.

  • This desire to make children.

  • Well, again, then to wash washout Winston close them, but, in fact, that can cause problems with infection later on.

  • So, leaving those wounds, open, and then that you will come back, and that was part of what we call the surgical tail.

  • But, you know, you're not going to do the primary treatment on the first night, what you're going to do is make things, as I said, safe and clean and you'll come back later and close the wound in that cleaner environment.

  • So we now have more experience than we wanted of out and sharing that experience.

  • So a lot of requests coming in for us And pass that on, so that people know how to respond.

  • Should that happen in their own it.

  • Well how difficult is it for a hospital, when you've got so many of these cases, all coming in at the same, we do something called damage control surgery.

  • So it's not long definitive surgery.

  • It's what needs to be done to keep your patient safe and well get them stabilised and we knew that that was going to be sixty to ninety minutes of surgery, only per patient, and we actually got through all patients that we admitted from round about one o'clock in the morning to seven o'clock.

  • The following evening soundtrack that was rapid surgery to control life threatening situations and to keep them.

  • Was there a particular moment that night that you remember well, or was it all kind of blur.

  • I think there were a lot of moments, I remember, it was all joined up with how quickly people stepped up and just seeing my colleagues willing able and getting on with the job.

  • These are caring talented, highly trained people working as a team, within a system that's been designed to help them achieve the best they can for their patients, and that was the overwhelming thing that people just stepped up and any time you picked up the phone, the answer was yes, and things arrived, and I remember, at one point, looking around all the patients and really needing to take a stocktake really Sound sight unfortunate phrase on where we were, and from going well, I'm going to take one of our consultant used to saying, I'm going to take a team of people around and they just had a massive order and on every patient and made sure that everything that needed to be done with done and effort that was in the right place, and that just made a huge difference.

  • For me, being able to support what was what was happening that teamwork was incredible and where those people, including yourself, we were just able that night to focus on the roll, you had the professional job and not really digests the terrible nature of what had gone on in my home city.

  • I think that's right, I think it um, you know, we are described as we sort of came blinking out into the sunlight.

  • The next day, not quite realising we were in the Middle of an international story.

  • I was getting texts from around the country, offering help, which was, you know that that's heartening that, and it's good to know you've got a back up plan, I was certainly standing there.

  • Two days later, wondering how we'd manage if it happened again in Manchester and so having that support from around our national teams was hugely comforting and members of the public to an eminent people were sending pizzas into the hospital.

  • I don't know what we had we had tons of food, it was, and We needed it.

  • In fact, there was no time to sort of access food in any other way.

  • So, having stores of food around the hospital was really helpful, but there were things we found out about later that we didn't know about that somebody put her holiday money behind one of the bars nearby.

  • And we're going to missed out on that, just so little acts of kindness that really did make a difference.

  • It was lovely to know that people cared about the people who were caring for the people I saw people still in hospital there.

  • Ah yes, yes, and there's still people coming into outpatients and coming backwards and forwards.

  • So I'm going to the first two weeks, the involvement was wide, but after those first couple of weeks that care still goes on, but with much smaller team, and what we have is small, we have team backed up by some of the work that the health and social care partnership do in Manchester.

  • Do you think it's taken a toll emotionally, not me personally.

  • Undoubtedly, and I think everyone's different, and we're still seeing some of that sort of unexpectedly around the hospital.

  • People suddenly start talking about it, and I think it's comfortable to talk about it within the team in the hospital, because we've been through similar things.

  • Some of our families were struggling to support us a little bit, because we've been through something they couldn't imagine it felt so different Home felt more different from work than usual, and that sort of levelled out a little bit.

  • I think we're all changed it's, it's just a different path that we're taking, and I think a job for the children and their families, but also for the people within the hospital in the hospital is to rehabilitate ourselves and to be back on a different path, but not necessarily all this path, I think, I think we've learnt a lot.

  • I think there's a lot more.

  • We can do, and we can, I think we've shown how a service can be, and it needs two, it's how we want it, we wanted to be like that all the time, and I know that that's resource dependent, but there's, I think there's ways of doing this, and I think this is an opportunity to bring people together to put that supporting and everyone just around the arena victims Naomi Davies from the Royal Manchester children's hospital.

  • And that brings us to today's closing headlines Theresa may's began a three day visit to Japan, by insisting that the U.K.'s strongmen longstanding trading partnership with Tokyo will continue post breaks it do you n. migration Agency says, thousands of ringa Muslims have fed from Myanmar.

  • In the past few days to escape violence Scottish labour is looking for a new leader.

  • After the resignation of kizzy dug down in the city.