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World At One 2017-08-25:12:45.00
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  • Thank you for downloading this podcast of the world at one on B.B.C. radio four, the world at one, this is Edward stourton with forty five minutes of news and comment, the immediate transport future looks bleak with cancelled trains and jams on the roads over the Bank holiday weekend, but the government is directing her eyes to the long view with the announcement, the driverless lorries are on their way.

  • Will they work, plus, yeah, I had a shinbone bounce, I've Yeti, they were country and, as the game.

  • I come from, they can say what they want.

  • I've come drill a lot tougher than any of these of country song, Canon Irish martial arts champion beat the best boxer of his era.

  • At his own game.

  • Thailand's former Prime Minister has fled the country.

  • Just before the verdict in her trial was to draw them head will bring us the latest hauliers and other motoring organisations have expressed their opposition to the government's plan to test wireless controlled lorry convoys on British roads, the automobile Association says it has major safety concerns, while the road haulage Association believes the convoys could become a target for terrorists and to Gill reports, the idea.

  • The government wants to explore is called platoon, winning three trucks travelling much closer together than normal their speed and distance controlled by wireless technology.

  • Each lorry would have a driver in the cab.

  • In case Of emergencies supported, they could mean less congestion, fuel consumption and pollution, but some transport expert have a doubt the road haulage Association has major concerns.

  • It's worried the convoys could block motorway exits and entrances, it appears the wireless technology could be hijacked by terrorists.

  • The Aye Aye is also burnt it host put tuning might work in America, where there are long on congested stretches of road, whereas ours are much busier rail passengers are being warned to expect disruption over the Bank holiday weekend.

  • While major engineering works are carried out several stations in London are closed.

  • Road works have been lifted on motorways to ease congestion, a correspondent dinner Campbell is at Euston station in London and sent this report.

  • This is a huge project involving seventeen thousand engineers, he will be doing work to prepare for h. s. two extending platforms for longer trains and improving their tracks and signalling network rail, says the improvements will benefit millions of passengers in the long term, it's decided to do the work.

  • This week, because fifty percent fewer passengers use their services during the August Bank holiday Euston station will completely close from tomorrow, affecting passengers up and down the U.K., with no trains to London from the West coast mainline sports of ants will also be affected, including fans travelling to the rugby League final at Wembley stadium roads and airports will also be disrupted.

  • The advice is to check before you travel.

  • British Airways has Called on the home Office to alleviate what it says a frustrating delays for passengers flying into Heathrow airport, the airline said, usually only a third of the automatic passport control machines terminal five were open causing massive queues, and that it was important to show the U.K. was an easy place to travel to the former Prime Minister of Thailand in luck chin, or what has fled the country hours before a verdict was due on a criminal negligence case against her and seeing like faced a possible ten year prison sentence if found guilty of failing to prevent corruption in a wry subsidy scheme during her administration.

  • At least three people have been killed in northern India in violence, which broke out after a self styled spiritual leader, was convicted of raping two women, tens of thousands of followers of cool meet rum Rahim seeing gathered in the town of Chandigarh, where the verdict was announced, some of them reacted by smashing Windows of parked vehicles, prompting riot police to use, tear gas and water cannon are South Asia correspondent Justin roller artist following developments from Delhi, the followers of the self styled God, man and spiritual guru go meet ram Singh, have been rampaging through the town of punch cooler.

  • That's where the guilty verdict was handed down this afternoon, outside the Court his followers had gathered in their tens of thousands to demonstrate their support for the man, many of them regard as a living, Saint Soon after the judgement.

  • They set fire to media vehicles and threw stones at the police when tear gas and water cannons failed to subdue the crowds, the police, fire live rounds.

  • The Bureau has a huge following, he's cultivated a rock star image.

  • He's got a huge beard and likes to be portrayed riding a big motorcycle, and he's dearer such a sound a sect claims to have fifty million followers Syrian sources say at least thirty four fighters from pro government forces have been killed by the Islamic state group in rock a province, they say, i. s. has launched a major counter attack against government troops and has really taken a considerable amount of territory, the foreign Secretary Boris Johnson has rejected calls from the United Nations for a temporary halt in hostilities, so that civilians trapped in rock, a city can leave the national trust has increased the ground rent for hundreds of people in leasehold properties, by up to ten thousand per cent tenants have accused the trust of commercial opportunism and have demanded an enquiry not rebel has more details.

  • These eye watering rent rises affects around three hundred households, mainly in the South West and South East of England that had purchased leases of over twenty one years from the national trust with a nominal ground rent of hundreds of Pounds a year when renewing for a further fifty years or so called modern ground rent was payable increasing annual bill's immensely some By over ten thousand Pounds a year, the tenants' Association claims the extension was originally marketed as free and accuse the trust of exploiting people to make a quick and very large buck the trust said it would halve the ground rent for poorly advise tenants and forego it altogether.

  • For anyone misled by the trust an aristocrat, who was jailed for twelve weeks for making offensive and threatening comments online about the bricks it campaigner Gina Miller has abandon appeal against his sentence.

  • Andre Phillips, the fourth Viscount Saint David's was warned his jail term could be increased if he was unsuccessful cricket and at Headingley England's batsmen have had a difficult morning at the start of the second test match against the West Indies.

  • At lunch, a few minutes ago, they'd reached sixty one for three.

  • Thank you, the back holiday, we weather forecast is a bit patchy, but certainly for those in the South, Notts about, however, you may want to think twice before actually going anywhere, as the travel forecast is pretty grim, especially if you're planning to use the railways did a Campbell is at Euston station, one of the station's affected by a huge engineering project, and this before we came on, she told me what's involved.

  • Well, as you say, this is a huge project involving the seventeen thousand engineers, he will be doing work to prepare for the new h. s. two lime extending platforms for longer trains and making improvements to The tracks and signalling.

  • It's starting to get a lot busier here at Euston station.

  • And that's because, from tomorrow, this station will be closed for the next two days.

  • Because of this engineering project network rail says it's better to do this work.

  • At this time of year, because fifty percent fewer passengers use their services during the Bank holiday, and this effectively would be short term pain for long term Ross Easton is from network rail, there's never an ideal taints construe improvement works, but we carried fifteen thousand projects every every year, and most of those happen overnight.

  • Gene Bank holidays, fewer people are travelling eleven much bigger projects, for we do our best communicators as fine advances possible, so the passengers can look at alternative travel arrangements, there's never an ideal tens carry this engineering work that we're delivering one hundred thirty three million pens improvements for a bigger and better railway for all very well, but I don't imagine that's how passengers will see, that's right, there will be no trains to London from the West coast main line.

  • That's one of the U.K.'s most significant roots, so that means no services connecting the major cities of London, Birmingham, Liverpool, Manchester and Glasgow Euston isn't the only station affected in London, work will also be happening at Waterloo, London, bridge Liverpool streets and having certain we spoke to some passengers planning their journeys.

  • This week, a Bank holiday weekend for sort of the big holiday Times when people are moving around more make the service happen.

  • And, you know, otherwise you have to figure out how to schedule it in between those times work's got to be done.

  • So it's going to cause some distress things seem to be running smoothly.

  • I think it's absolute madness.

  • Obviously, people are going to struggle, you can see how busy.

  • It is the day, I just think it's really meant to do that.

  • That's the picture in London.

  • What about the rest of the country.

  • It's not just the railways, roads are also expected to be busier than normal, especially on Monday, with five million more passengers expected on the roads for les you getaways.

  • That's, according to the R.A.C., what's will be busy as well, especially Heathrow.

  • It's a big weekend for sports rugby League fans could be some of the worst affected by this work with the challenge Cup happening at Wembley stadium on Sunday.

  • And, of course, there's Notting hill Carnival is well the advice, as always, is to check it was a dinner Campbell at Euston with all that going on, it seems somehow fitting that the government should choose today to announce the trial of lorry convoy is controlled by wife eye on motorways, they'll move in groups of three, all man, but with most of the driving of the hands of the driver in the lead vehicle could they be a milestone on the road to a brave new world of driverless Traffic, we'll bake that in a moment or two, but first, a report, a dove Whitworth has been speaking to drivers at a petrol station in Lancashire quick sceptical, to be honest about how safe.

  • The trial itself could be, never mind taken it to a wider area, believe that this attention for more support scenarios that could be detrimental to road users and general public, Allergy is it really able to deliver what it says autonomous vehicles or something, which I don't really believe that the general public as a motorist.

  • I would like to see on the road.

  • I'm going to tell us an interesting idea.

  • There's a huge number of lorries on the road, and I think it becomes really quite terrifying for drivers when they're overtaking each other, or if we're in some of these narrow lanes were motorways are being repaired or upgraded.

  • At the moment, but if it reduced the congestion.

  • I suppose it might reduce cos there is some value in it.

  • So I think it's worth trying, but personally, I'd like to see them in the slow lane only coming up to junctions.

  • When you're pulling out three lorries in convoy junction.

  • Is there going to be enough space for three of them to pull out one goes know all sorts that could happen with this, you just don't know until you test it, the government are pumpin eight hundred million into it.

  • Eight million eight million eight million wasting money again On, they're really that Christian woman as an author and transport expert, and he's written about the myth of driverless cars.

  • He was a labour cubs in the Richmond by election in twenty sixteen, Oh, they're a myth, really, or do you think I think that what we've heard today is a step towards turning that myth and reality.

  • What, there's a fantastic amount of hype about the idea that driverless cars are round the corner.

  • And we're going to have millions are on the on the road, very soon, this announcement is typical, actually, because it's about the third time that the government, he said, Oh, there's going to be driverless platoons of lorries on the motorways next year or the year after we've had this announcement before, and it hasn't happened.

  • And you know what.

  • What is this, trying to solve.

  • That's the clear issue, I don't think it will solve any congestion Lucy's for a start.

  • Well, it's supposed to make things more environmentally friendly, isn't it.

  • Because, as I understand it, the fact is that the front vehicle will displace the air, and therefore, the other two vehicles will use less energy to travel, the same distance.

  • That's fantastic.

  • The marginal and there is another far older invention that would actually do that in a much more efficient way with maybe forty or fifty of wagon loads, which would be, of course, the train the freight train, you know, we could actually build extra capacity into Ways to accommodate a fake sex, rather than having this emphasis on roads, where, which I already overcrowded.

  • All right, even though you were a bit sniffy about this.

  • Do you not accept that it's worth trying.

  • Or do you think there are real risks involved.

  • I think there's better things that could be done as one of your respondents said, with the eight Wigan, I can't reach.

  • Well, you could spend the money on improving psyching for, so this is one of my particular things you could improve the, you could spend the money on improving the railways alive.

  • I've suggested I three lorries following each other, he's pretty dangerous on our overcrowded motor is a lot of this technology has been developed at the United States, where there's huge freeways.

  • While you're hundreds of miles.

  • We've got much traffic.

  • This is totally different.

  • I can't see this as ever been viable on the m. twenty five, can you.

  • Well, I was for me to ask the question, rather than you, and I suppose, one that will occur to people as they listen to you is that if you don't try things a little bit, and if you don't dream, a bit about what the future might look like, you're never going to get anywhere of actually the idea of of driverless cars is immensely appealing if it could be made to work.

  • What is it appealing.

  • I mean, I've talked to boat, it's about this than a lot Of us, they were actually quite enjoy motoring up in people amazingly do, of course, they don't particularly congested towns, but they like having control over their own because they like, even the golf clubs overnight in the car, and this whole vision perpetrated by the tech companies, and by the auto manufacturers is of a driverless future where we all have pods that will be driven automatically city centres, but I'm not sure this is necessarily utopia.

  • I think it's more than that, but it's worth exploring.

  • For example, safety, if drivers cars have decent technology.

  • They're probably be safer than a lot of us, you don't get tired driving on long journeys are all sorts of things that you can imagine, big advantages.

  • I think you can try driver aids support drivers in to prove their driving with better braking systems and that sort of thing, but my view is that the driverless near Barnard that Oughta manufacturers and tech manufacturers talking about is nowhere near achievable or desirable.

  • Do we really want to put some half million or billion taxi drivers and lorry drivers out of jobs.

  • When we're already unemployment is it guy.

  • What is that a Moonbase, and nobody has much to actually explain that, and you work, what there future is, of course, safety is a potential, it's, you've got remember, there was a case in America, where a guy would on his automatic driving car, and it actually crashed into Lorient killed it.

  • While he was watching a Harry Potter film woman.

  • Thank you, Professor Phil Blythe is the Director of the transport operations research group and Newcastle University, and advises the Department for transport, good afternoon, get off before we address on this bigger questions, the clear concern that came through one or two of those drivers who don't talk to the petrol station in Lancashire was, unsurprisingly, perhaps about safety.

  • One dust.

  • Imagine you let these experiments on the road, without being sure that they are safe.

  • But reassurance.

  • Well, I think the whole point of doing controlled trial like the proposing on the motorway is to test out things like safety, environmental benefits and others that could could occur within the automated vehicles, and I think until until you test them, you can't get the, Oh, what it questions in your mind.

  • So I think, actually having some well establishing control trials.

  • It is, it's worth doing just to just to go answer.

  • Question, one way or the other, but that slightly alarming, isn't it enough, we had to go, but we can't be sure, given what might happen if it went wrong on a motor and three great big lorries trundling up the road.

  • I mean, shouldn't you be sure that we can be confident, they're not going to kill us before you let them loose well from, from my understanding the way the trolls or planned and clearly the depart for transport, the transport research laboratory were Running these trolls.

  • I've been doing a lot of work.

  • Are you still with us, we'll blow I know, can you just drop you and you very kindly stopped somewhere fairly remote to, but you're dropping him about winners.

  • Yes, a lot like nice, let's keep going and continue with, what do you say, O.K., well might be stunning.

  • It's a trolls have been designed to test a range of functions of vehicle when the vehicles are talking to each other, but there is a driver in the car, ready to take over in the lorry.

  • If it's things look like they're not going well, I think, I think they've been planned in a very cautious and Safeway, but as a say, until you get these vehicles on the road test.

  • It's very unlikely that you can, you can really understand any future challenges with the the safety, she associated with them.

  • All right.

  • Well, let's address on the bigger questions are Christian former raised a moment or two ago, where is this going.

  • What is the vision that inspire spending money on something like this.

  • All the automotive manufacturers who've been beguiled by automation for a number of years now, they will, they all have their own progress we developing automated vehicles in this big programmes in Europe.

  • In Japan, in the States, I'm sorry, I think we've just try once one Phil bloody still with us.

  • I think we better, we better leave it there.

  • Thank you.

  • If you can still hear us for joining us and making effort Lisette and our apologies for it for that.

  • The United Nations current call for a pause in the fighting in there, Sir, in city of racket Ultraman civilians to escape recalls a similar U.N. initiative in Aleppo, in December, if you're a regular listener to this programme.

  • You may remember that we heard regularly from an English teacher in a leper called Abdul taffy how al hamdu and one of you emailed in to find out what's happened to him.

  • Since the Aleppo bombardment ended so been runner has been finding out as bombs pummelled the city of Aleppo.

  • Thirty two year old Abdul Kaffee summed up the feared stalking the streets of his city, we are brain, I'll just leave it and you don't expect that we will get up in the morning, it's bitter hopping.

  • Now it's is the sky, it's full of it's is all this Tardis..

  • Lights at all, and he put his thinking in darkness.

  • So we can see this guy clearly.

  • Now I am looking at it's pitiful all the beautiful, thinking that that's lift, I think, because there were planes destroyed everything beautiful city.

  • His simple tales of ordinary family life.

  • Set against a backdrop of explosions brought home the horrors of living in a war zone, including the difficulty of feeding his newborn baby daughter, I can't have the meltwater have not now, but, by the way, she is now Lying beside me.

  • Aren't you loving it.

  • She makes me optimistic.

  • When I look at her eyes, I see a good future.

  • Then, last December, as the Russian bombardment killed off friends and left his neighbourhood in a pile of rubble and the rebels lost control of Aleppo Abdel Kaffee finally had to leave his home in order to save his wife and baby daughter, as he waited in line to be evacuated.

  • He spoke to us, the phone line was so poor, we asked an actor at voice up his words, the weather is so cold.

  • Some people have been here since nine A.M. yesterday, and the children are so hungry, they're crying.

  • They're freezing, most of them here are scared of a brutal end to the ceasefire got a Ribbentrop's gently in down, because now we don't have choices, either die, or leave that's over the last few days, there was much bombing and killing, which was unbelievable.

  • The building next to my home collapsed on to the ground.

  • I could hear the cries of children under the rubble, and no one could help, and nobody could reach them.

  • It's extermination.

  • In the last few days, my wife has been crying, all of the time.

  • She's been afraid for herself about me about her daughter, all the time, two days ago, she told me that she's so tired.

  • She wanted to die.

  • She can't stand this, that was the last we heard from addle Kaffee al hamdu eight Months on, I asked him what happened next.

  • Just imagine, about one hundred people, including forty one children with their Luggage in a bus, they have to do everything on the buzz, I mean not wallet.

  • Not you can, but I'll put my wife, in the last days, was sick.

  • So she didn't have milk for my daughter, my don't lib swears dry she wants what she wants something to eat, then they don't have anything.

  • Every time I speak to that christened Member, I say, I need water, and he said, these gives Ireland for you saved you.

  • I said, I want to go out, I want, whatever, my God, but he said no, if you speak more or you might be armed and not Ollie, you're all the bus might be hard, we might be sure did, there was a woman, she was pregnant, and she started bleeping.

  • They didn't allow her to go out of bus just another kind of hell, and it was the red Crescent who were evacuated.

  • You were you worried when he went that the regime would punish the people who had been in the lab, believe me, all people who were in the bus, where Fred, my wife, I sort of read, you know that it was a convoy, which was Todd's and many people were killed before us, so you wear a thread that this might be repeated.

  • So, where.

  • Where are you now.

  • And do you feel safe, where you Are in the countryside, a bit lib team poetry Lee, I feel safe.

  • I mean, I started in your lives.

  • I teach now believe me, that when we sleep.

  • Now we see dreams.

  • Those horrific dreams.

  • Many times, my wife told me that you seem scared.

  • Well, you asked me, so that's why we haven't pretended kids that we see horrors wincey blood with distraction wants you these bombs fires all people a fictive we feel normal, and sometimes you feel it's not normal here and there are no planes not bombs.

  • It's not that I felt that it's, but I imagine life without bombs is good, the area, you're in, what will you do if the regime takes that over really every time.

  • This is that the repeated question of my wife, what do you mean your if farm started falling upon our heads, and you know that they're the board, there is with thirteen a closet.

  • I mean everyone tried to ask the border is he was shot by that a sagas so really, we don't know.

  • This is the future of all people would live and the countryside, and I deplore the a friend, I'm seeing her again.

  • This is the last piece that we have, you'd have nowhere else.

  • Now, yeah, not least now, no way.

  • I've been in our hands and waiting, I want a life that been based on freedom, based on democracy based on equality, this is my best dream just finally really Memorable.

  • You want to talk to us, when there was no lights, there was no nothing in left really in Aleppo.

  • You talk to us about looking up at the stars, yeah, yeah, remember exactly you still look, I don't now and led, yeah, you hear you remind me of something I sup teach my daughter, English, but then imagine the language.

  • Now, the first three words that she she knows is moon stars and car at night, I see where Morn she points at Morn, and that's good, so you have got.

  • Do you know, I look at them, and they are beautiful, they are one of the things that remind me of a dipper, because, in fact, I did what I was looking at stars, a lot because everything was destroyed by the sky.

  • So you've got something good report from Bambi brother, and you can hear more about will have his story on the P.M. programme, this Saturday, on radio four at five thirty in the afternoon, coming up on this programme, a four thousand year old lesson in doing trigonometry without angles, like that, a man who makes his living by kicking people in a cage takes on a master of the Mobil art of boxing, the mystery surrounding the whereabouts of the former Thai Prime Minister, you luck, so the watcher has been cleared up, at least some of it has, we now know that she has indeed fled the country.

  • Just before The verdict in her trial for criminal negligence was due to be delivered.

  • Quite a fall from grace for a leader who, not so very long ago, welcomed President Obama to Thailand had got some wood words and return.

  • This is Barack Obama Secretary upstate give me a great pleasure to welcome you to be the first country to receive you after your dissociate re eviction especially pleased to see the excellent leadership, Madam, Prime Minister, you are providing as you continue this country's pair of democracy, freedom and a belt.

  • That was a twenty twelve today, she's on the run a reporter Jonathan head is in Bangkok.

  • No word, I imagine, yeah, Jonathan about where she's gone.

  • Is there no, they'll keep that pretty quiet, it seems, she fled quite close to the date of the verdict this morning, very unexpected.

  • She's been, Defiant, I'm her brother fled before a verdict against him.

  • Nine years ago and has been in exile.

  • Ever since brother taxing should know what she stayed, even under military rule.

  • She was she used to show up in Court.

  • She's very telegenic, she's to get a lot of support her, she looked like somebody who was willing to be perhaps a political martyr at least a significant political figure, and we don't really know what finally changed her mind, but this is Thailand, nothing is as it seems, on the surface, although, you know, she was charged with a serious criminal offence of Negligence, leading to a lots of corruption, behind the scenes, there were negotiations.

  • She and her party are still the largest party in the country.

  • They've got the most support.

  • There are significant political player, it was certainly negotiations about what this Court, that it would be, we don't know what went wrong, but somehow at the last minute.

  • She was spooked enough to decide that perhaps the vet it was going to go very much against her, and that it wasn't worth staying.

  • I daresay, she'll pop up again.

  • Her brother does every now and again, and they will find out what her plans are and what she thinks about it right now.

  • So it's a great disappearing act remind us about the charges against her, what exactly was she accused of doing, she's she's accused, not of corruption, but of allowing it to happen, as Prime Minister, when she swept to Office her party has won every election for the last twenty years, and after a period of a sort of cobble together government her party won resoundingly in two thousand and eleven she had greatest supporters in the port North or North East of the country where there are lots of rice farmers.

  • She promised to buy all the rice from farmers, at a very high price and give him an effect, a massive subsidy.

  • A lot of people said, this would never work.

  • It seems they hope they'll be able to push the price up.

  • And, Indeed, didn't work.

  • It was written with corruption, she was eventually ousted by a coup after some very well organised a street protest that crippled her government, he didn't really have much to do with the right scheme, but once the current military government took over, they use the abuses in the rice scheme, as a kind of justification, and so they put her on trial for negligence.

  • Basically, failing to prevent the corruption, but her supporters are pointed out under a military government.

  • They see this is essentially a political move to destroy her party's most successful vote winner, and you mentioned her brother, the parties with something of a family business, I suppose, Oh, very much so, but then parties, usually are on this part of the world.

  • Her brother is a telecoms tycoon who really launched the first modern political party in Thailand, but you could argue in the region that not one just a collection of old godfathers who deliver the vote, old style, but with modern marketing techniques.

  • Developing a real relationship with poorer people using policies, they like, and the policies were successful.

  • In most cases, originally good health care schemes to to help poor people in the villages.

  • That is the reason he still resoundingly popular in the provinces, where there are lots of voters, even though here and Bangkok, people are very sceptical of his power appetite for power and some of the corruption, and that party name that they, The family name get associate with a party really works, which is why he appointed his sister to replace him because he's been in exile.

  • Now she's out of the way.

  • To be honest, although it's a big family.

  • There isn't another vote winner in the family, so we're not quite sure who picks up the mantle now, and anyway, nobody now are really knows whether the military is going to allow the parties to have their robust kind of politics, they had in the past.

  • Whenever we return to some kind of democracy, which is expected.

  • The next eighteen months.

  • And how are her supporters reacting on their supporters reacting or would be expected to react.

  • What they're a bit bewildered, because they came to Court, as they have done for all her Court hearings, and they're very passionate, a lot of kind of, you know, rather characterful grannies who come in for the provinces waving red roses and very colourful clothes with slogan supporting her, they all thought she'd show up, but I think it's not really going to damage her core support match, but being stuck in exile.

  • You know, she can't be much of a vote when, so the party is going to struggle to find somebody else who can pick up the mantle once Thailand returns to some kind of electoral politics, Jonathan, very many thanks Plimpton three, two, to say, small four thousand year old tablets covered with numbers, which to most of us Would be incomprehensible, but of Australian mathematician believes it rewrites our understanding of the history of trigonometry and could change the way maths is done today.

  • I'm going to leave it to Daniel Mansfield at University of new South Wales to explain why it's so significant because it's challenging stuff.

  • He told me about the history of Plympton three to two, it's got a very amazing history that goes over seventy years, but even beyond that, actually, because if it starts with n. can banks to obtained from a dealer in Iraq, he banks.

  • He's an amazing character, he was only archaeologists academic and obtain a rare antiquity, even when searching for, and now he's out.

  • She's the kind of person upon which they based Indiana Jones, he's easily quite a quite an amazing character contain the and solid to George Clinton's attend odds George up Clinton was American publisher and collectors ancient mathematical texts, but at this time, it wasn't going to be anything wrong just a tablet with numbers on it was really in nineteen forty five when not your sats just going, what it had on, and it became famous, not the numbers on this towel Pythagorean triples, which was amazing, because up until that point, we saw Pythagoras discovered depository relation between the sides and right tribe, I actually remember linings my drawing what just boot when you say, with these were these are Pythagorean triples in that they were all a mathematical description of a Track, yes, so it's lined contains an Pythagorean triple and old remind you using triangle has a side of a right triangle has signed wing, so you'd be in, I think you see, he's been tossed b. squared is equal to seize spready sneeze triple numbers are related to each other, and nobody had discovered this all worked out what the numbers meant until now, is that right.

  • I wouldn't go that far.

  • People been looking at this for a very long time, and discovering things like to happen behind the numbers and secreting the errors that are on the tablet, as well.

  • I'm doing really is saying, I mean all this research that's been done on and stand on the shoulders of these giants and say, I think this is trigonometry.

  • I completely different kind of trigonometry to the one that we have today, and to be clear about the significance of that Pythagoras lived Berlin's bawled out five seventy, wasn't it something like that, and this is much, much older.

  • This is, this is much older than that, but there's a difference between having an idiot Pythagoras and doing trigonometry is Pythagoras trilogy was simple, he just says, the signs are in a trying all related trigonometry is more like the systematic study of triangles.

  • And that's a much more sophisticated and nobody had thought until now that the Babylonians, were capable of of doing that nobody consultant, you can do trigonometry without angles, and that's key contribution Here, and I suppose the question that that raises his, whether that's a better way.

  • A bit.

  • Is it something that we can apply today, it's got its inventor agents, and certainly, I think we can we could a fight.

  • Tomorrow, and one example might be in schools, where we teach people about triangles and trigonometry.

  • We can say, for a moment, hang on a second yangos darned today's lesson, we're going to do trigonometry the Babylonian wave by only looking and shirts to adopt this baloney monster.

  • If you see where you during triangles, which is perfectly exam, whereas now, we could, you know, she's always approximate I imagine this makes Plimpton three to two worth a bit more than the ten bucks.

  • That was originally paid for it.

  • Yes, I was tempted to put in an offer myself and Tom, I thought I would my entreaty rose Daniel Mansfield, of the University of new South Wales story broke just for you came up here a Viscount was found guilty of sending menacing messages to the anti bricks it campaigner Jean Miller has abandoned his appeal against his sentence cloud Coleman, he's at Southwark Crown Court just remind us of the details of the case.

  • Client robbery Cole when Phillips, were found guilty of two counts of posting menacing communications.

  • That was a Westminster magistrates' Court in July.

  • He was sentenced to twelve weeks in prison.

  • Now, they took the form of Facebook's posts, and they offered Money to anyone who was prepared to harm run down.

  • And, in fact, the business will when Gina Miller, who had successfully challenged the government over the triggering of arsenal.

  • Fifty of the Lisbon Treaty, and also a man called Arnold sue, he was an immigrant who had reportedly refused a five bedroom Council House for his family of eight children, it was in November of last year that Gina Miller won her case at the high Court in, it was just some four days later that robbery for that also holds the title for the fourth Viscount Saint David's Lord to mollinson Lord strange of knockin he posted comments on Facebook, and they included the words, five thousand for the first person to accidentally run over this bloody troublesome first generation immigrant.

  • He also referred to her as a boat jumper, he said, if this is what we should expect from in immigrants and send them back to their stinking jungle.

  • He also, offered aboutit two thousand for the first person to have Mister su bait carved into pieces, and it's in relation to that that he received twelve weeks' sentence back in July, and it peel, because, you know what, what what, what changed his mind, it was a very dramatic turn around today, he'd already abandonment and appeal against his conviction.

  • But this morning, the appeal against sentence with due to take place, he arrived with the many supporters legal team.

  • But what happened was that The judge should began the proceedings that she had looked at all of the papers in the case unity magistrate sitting with her, and it was her duty to advise Viscount Saint David's that if the appeal preceded than the Court could impose a higher sentence than those twelve weeks, and based on that indication Viscounts and David's barrister asked for some time to advise him, he had obviously was already aware that there was a possibility that the sentence could be increased, but taking that advice, there was a fifteen minute German, they all came back into Court and his barrister told the judge that he had decided to abandon his appeal base, presumably on the possibility, the threat that that twelve weeks of imprisonment could be increased.

  • He serves some five days of it before he bought his appeal.

  • He will now serve the rest of that sentence in four ply very many facts used to hype in professional boxing, but even by the sports extreme standards, the buzz surrounding satellites phisit las Vegas, it's remarkable Floyd Mayweather generally regarded as the modern master of the sport is coming out of retirement to face trobhad Gregor who isn't even a boxer don MacRae has written extensively about boxing and has twice won the William hill sports book of the year, and he's written a profile of progress is quite a fascinating individual.

  • I did interview him in Tony fifteen enough found highly eloquent intelligent men who had quite A fascinating past in two thousand thirteen, he was still signing on the Dole, having given up his job as an apprentice, plumber, and he had this fantasy that he was going to become a u. f. c. fighter.

  • Here we are four years later, not only has he conquered the world of M.M.A. and F.C., but now he's going to have his first ever boxing for item supposedly earn over one hundred million dollars, so it's quite a tale.

  • I'm proud of all the luxuries.

  • Don't forget that I must walk out, and you have C.B., what exactly it is the sort of flagship but professional arm of mixed martial arts.

  • What it does is it enables fighters to use all kinds of martial art techniques, they can use judo jujitsu boxing as well.

  • So all these different forms of fighting that happen in one particular Bart, yeah, I had a shinbone bounce your cheek, of a country, and as the game.

  • I come from, they can say what they want.

  • I've come drill a lot tougher than any of these have gone through, and it takes place in a cage is that right.

  • It's funny, I haven't done much work, but whenever I do interview someone in that world, I'm told not to call in the cage.

  • They like to use the word, Octagon cos, I think that's advertises it a little bit, but effectively, it is a steel cage.

  • Yes, Floyd Mayweather absolutely mainstream boxer, a very Successful one typical a boxing in many ways, in the sense that he's had quite a difficult past, as it as a young boy, but he has actually taken control of his own boxing business and is the wealthiest sportsmen in the world, the boxing is in steep decline, so he's quite a clever man, you mention Floyd Mayweather was extraordinary record, but he's getting on a bit, isn't it.

  • Yes, he's forty years old, actually hung up his gloves.

  • Two years ago, he's come back to Fiats.

  • Because I think it's coming easy pay day for him, and he will make a buck won twenty five million for this fight alone.

  • So I guess as a business man, it makes a lot of sense.

  • Ten of these watch right here, tin watches, I made a world whirling tis only too much in the world, like his wife's really you, so it was four hundred thousand were used to hype in the world of boxing, but the figures been talked about for this writer pretty eye watering.

  • Why is that.

  • Wise and so much interest in this.

  • I think people are fascinated by the idea of Colin McGregor, who's never had a boxing fight before he did box as an amateur, but not as a professional, he's involved in a world where people can kick each other and use all kinds of violent techniques and is making his debut as a novice against supposedly the master modern boxer Floyd Mayweather, He's had forty nine fights never lost one, where are you putting your money.

  • For me, it's a clear cut Floyd Mayweather will win the Safi.

  • Why.

  • Why are you so confident about because I think a man who's had forty nine fights for multiple world champions and never had any difficulties that idea of him facing is making his debut as a professional boxer logically it suggests, it is a bit of a mismatch, but Colin McGregor whatever he's done in the past.

  • Whatever he's predicted.

  • He's going to do.

  • He has done so maybe he can shock us all.

  • I believe, I remember the better fight.

  • O.K., a long stretch, I am moist, I am smarter.

  • He is tough, durable and b., that's it.

  • I'm going to put up against their fans.

  • And I'm still going to boast that soft skin up, he's got he might have a Rocio album that opening.

  • Do you think this fight does belong in the tradition of the sort of great glad at oriel meetings, like the rumble in the jungle.

  • So no, absolutely not.

  • There's no way I mean Muhammad Ali, the closest we could make as that Muhammad Ali, sort of the nineteen seventies Ford, a wrestler.

  • And that was dismissed as fast.

  • I think this is slightly different, because I think Connor McGregor in this world of M.M.A., he has had huge success, and he is illegitimate intelligent fighter, but I still think it is a bit of a Stunt.

  • If there is an upset if the outcome, isn't as you expect it and probable Gregor WinCE.

  • What does that mean for box funny enough talking, two fighters in Ireland boxers.

  • They are saying that would be devastating for boxing if Floyd Mayweather losers.

  • They all kind of have an affinity for Connor MacGregor, because it is such a talk and at such a showman.

  • So I think there's a mixed feelings in Ireland, but certainly in world boxing, I think most boxes and fans of boxing expect and hope that Floyd Mayweather will win, sort of a credible has a start closing headline large engineering projects across the rail network electrical severe disruption for Bank holiday travellers with several stations in London, been closed works also expected across the Midlands Wales and the North in the city short time to the one hundred share index was up twenty seven thousand four hundred and thirty six P.M.. has five to seven stourton, and that's the world at one forty five, and we leave you with a moment from the foreign Secretary's recent trip to Libya, which will surely stand out from the endless succession of official greetings witch of a lot of travelling diplomat's yes, how Boris Johnson was welcomed in bed.