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World At One 2017-07-31:12:54.00
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  • Thank you for downloading this podcast of the world at one on b. b. c. radio for the world at one, this is James Robbins with forty five minutes of news and comment.

  • Good afternoon, Vladimir Putin orders over seven hundred staff to leave the American Embassy and other diplomatic missions across Russia will ask Sir John saws, a former head of m.i.six what impact this deterioration in U.S Russian relations could have on the crisis with North Korea.

  • Ah, Donald trump's options narrowing towards eventual military action against the Maverick regime in Pyongyang Earl Spencer calls on channel four to pull their documentary on Princess Diana, when should private tapes, which it contains become a matter of public record, and then later in the programme, you're a semi finals Wimbledon quarter finals and the cricket.

  • World Cup win is women's sport.

  • Finally, in the mainstream and here from passion Bell were a service has been held to mark one hundred years since the battle, attended by four thousand relatives of those who fought there, but first, the B.B.C. news is read for us by Cathy Claxton Downing street has insisted that the free movement of people will end in March twenty nineteen when the U.K. leaves the European Union senior Ministers have set out what appear to be differing positions and recent days about the immigration policy, which will be put in place after Breck's it, and for how Long any transitional deal might last, here's our assistant political editor Norman Smith, after a series of interventions by the Chancellor Philip Hammond and the home Secretary amber Rudd that prompted claims, they were seeking to soften missus Mays approached a Brecht said Downing street today, sought to reassert control.

  • The government's approach to the negotiations, it was stressed remained as set out by missus may, at the start of the year, number ten also dismissed suggestions that freedom of movement might continue in all but name after breaks last week must rud floated proposals that would allow E.U. migrants to continue to come to the U.K. for a two year transitional period, provided they registered the Prime Minister's spokesman rejected to the possibility of an off the shelf trade deal with the E.U., such as that enjoyed by Norway and other members of the European free trade Association, which grants the membership of the single market.

  • Earlier, the health Secretary Jeremy hunt insisted Ministers remained completely United over breaks it or for a gun battle at the Iraqi Embassy and Campbell has ended after the three attackers apparently Islamic state group fighters were killed by the Afghan security services, the assault began with a suicide bomber blew himself up at the Embassy entrance Iraq shouted affair was among those who had to be moved to safety, the bee bee sees her own magic was near the scene.

  • As the battle raged there was no shooting at this stage, however, Every now and then we can head the sporadic hiring, it's probably because this two sites are found every now and then an explosion like this take place.

  • The operation is carried, how would we have riding to repel this silence, who have made their way into the Iraqi Embassy camp, the high Court has blocked an attempt by a former Chief of staff of the Iraqi army to bring a private prosecution against Tony Blair over the Iraq war, general Abdel Waheed Shannon Alpha about had accused the former Prime Minister of committing a crime of aggression by invading Iraq in two thousand and three, but the Court dismissed the case, we're in that such a crime did not exist in domestic law channel four has told al Spencer of the brother of Princess Diana, that it will broadcast private tapes of her talking about her personal life, despite his objections, the recordings were made by a voice coach and feature intimate details of her life and the collapse of her marriage to Prince Charles, here's our media correspondent David sillitoe Diana in her own words, as a documentary to mark the twentieth anniversary of her death did features recordings that she made with a voice coach Peter settle um, she talked at length about her unhappiness and the problems in a marriage, much of the material was shown by and b. c. in America in two thousand and four, but it's never been broadcast in the U.K..

  • Diana's Brother old Spencer has written to channel four objecting to the documentary Diana's friend, Rosa Monckton says it's a betrayal of the family's privacy channel four says it's an important historical document, and while some of the material, hasn't been shown before.

  • It covers topics that Diana later discussed publicly on the B.B.C.'s panorama programme, one of the world's highest paid sportsman the footballer Cristiano Ronaldo has appeared before a Court in Madrid, accused of tax fraud, the real Madrid player who's alleged to have evaded thirteen million Pounds in tax since twenty ten gave evidence to judge us for ninety minutes Ronaldo has previously denied the allegations saying his conscience is clear.

  • Prince Charles has proved the courage and bravery of the men who fought a passion Dale, as he led commemorations to mark one hundred years since the battle began the three and a half month offensive as one of the bloodiest events of the first world war, the Prince joined Theresa may the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, and the King and Queen of Belgium, at a ceremony at the time, cot Commonwealth cemetary near EEP from there, Johnny diamond send this report with music with memories of those who fought and lived in remembrance of those who fought and died Asten Dale has been commemorated much of the service was familiar, the last post the Exhortation the wreath laying, all against the backdrop of the twelve thousand headstones of Tyne cot cemetery but his memory has Turned into history, there was a renewed emphasis on the individuals who slogged through the Flanders mud Prince Charles quoted the reaction of his great grandfather George, the fifth to the site of Tyne cot.

  • I have many times asked myself whether they can be more potent advocates of peace upon earth.

  • Through the years to come, then this mast multitude of silent witnesses to the desolation of war, the service ended with a fly past by the Belgian air force.

  • One, a French cinema's biggest star Jeanne Moreau has died at her home in Paris.

  • She was eighty nine, the actress rose to fame in a series of rules and French new wave films of the sixties, including the classic Julie Jim in a career that spanned more than fifty years, Jean Maho won best actress at Cannes for moderate rattle come Tabbouleh in nineteen sixty and a Bafta for best foreign actress in nineteen sixty seven for Viva Maria cricket on the final day of the third test at the oval England have taken three more South African wickets as they try to secure victory at lunch, the tourists had reached two hundred Fifa seven chasing an improbable target.

  • Four hundred ninety two to win, I tungsten thanks is the world becoming even more uncertain.

  • I ask because Vladimir Putin has announced that seven hundred fifty five staff must leave the American Embassy in Moscow, and other U.S diplomatic missions across Russia, it's in retaliation for new U.S. Sanctions against Moscow, it brings overall staff levels down to some four hundred fifty, apparently, the same as Russia's numbers in the States, this is believed to be the largest action against any diplomatic staff from any country in recent times.

  • Yesterday, Russia's Deputy foreign Minister so Gary up cough told the American networks A.B.C.'s programme this week that Moscow might take further action against United States, if the U.S. side, decides to move further towards further deterioration that we will, we will respond in kind, we will mirror of this, we will retail we eat, we have are rich toolbox at our disposal, it would be ridiculous on my part to start speculating on what may or may not happen.

  • We are not gamblers where people who considered things very seriously and responsibly about that, I can assure you that different options are on the table, and consideration is being given to all sorts of things.

  • Russia's Deputy foreign Minister well a Moscow correspondent Sarah reigns for joins us now on the line.

  • So how serious is this latest development, what does that say about relations between the two Presidents, I think it's very serious, and I think it says that relations between the two countries are now in a dismal state, I it's a good up coffee, we're just hearing from the Deputy foreign Minister is something of the attack dog, if you like, of the Russian political establishment's President Putin himself was a little more restrained in His comments, and when he was asked whether there could be further sanctions.

  • He did say if something else is other measures are taken by the U.S., then Russia will look at responding, but for now, he didn't want that to happen.

  • He was quite restrained in that sense, I think it's interesting.

  • This is Russia essentially looking to its relations of the United States and saying, we had hoped for things to improve on Donald trump, we really hope that a new page would be turned and relations that the alleged sins of the past.

  • They were talking about the annexation of Crimea.

  • And then, of course, specifically the allegation of Russia meddling in the U.S. elections, Russia hoped, all of that will be forgotten.

  • They could start a new and that really hasn't happened, I think they're potentially in a game of spiralling sanctions and counter sanctions, and certainly very aggressive language, if not behaviour.

  • We can't go too deeply into this, but against this background, it's very hard to see it.

  • States and Russia lining up coordinating policy very easily over, for instance, the threat from North Korea.

  • It is, I think, it does make things increasingly difficult, although Vladimir Putin, when he was asked about that last night, he did say that he believed that Russia and America should still co operate in areas where that was to Russia's benefits.

  • So he talk specifically about the fight against terrorism.

  • He didn't mention North career, but he Did talk about Syria.

  • He talked about non proliferation, for example, in talks about other things like space exploration and work on getting astronauts into space, for example.

  • So Russia trying to say that, look, we're not cutting relations entirely, but we are sending a strong signal that we're not happy with the way this is going, I think, particularly because those sanctions that are being passed by the Congress, and that Donald trump is supposed to is expected to sign into law, they are extremely serious for Russia, and there is no end date to them or defines Russia as an aggressor and as an enemy of the United States, and there's no clear way back from that surround for the Moscow.

  • Thank you very much.

  • That new crisis in relations between Kremlin and the white House could hardly have come at a worse time.

  • Surely, just as the regime in North Korea, tests, an intercontinental missile apparently capable of reaching the American mainland.

  • It also test the limits of Donald trump's patients in the face of a possible future nuclear threat, which could quite soon become a present threat.

  • The President has made clear repeatedly that North Korea has to be stopped, but when and by what means Donald trump had hoped that China and also Russia would come to his aid, both, after all, have land borders with North Korea, but the President's very particular diplomatic style, often led by blunt blunt messages of no more Than a hundred forty characters denouncing his potential allies.

  • In other words, tweets that doesn't seem to be winning him friends when he most needs them should be very worried, where all this is heading.

  • Are there ways out of military confrontation with North Korea, one man who may know, is the former head of m. i. six former Ambassador to knighted Nations now Chairman of macro advisory partners, Sir John saws John good afternoon, the world feels in a pretty dangerous place, is that right.

  • I think these latest missile test by North Korea.

  • Certainly raise the threat level, because the United States has declared for many years that it could not accept.

  • They North Korean regime with the capacity to land a nuclear weapon on the United States, what these nature as your if it's as if you're setting your news report, they now have the ability to launch a missile that will reach the continental United States, they haven't yet shown, they've got a nuclear weapons.

  • Small enough to put on that on that missile or capable of of surviving re entry into the atmosphere, but you, you can't be sure about how rapidly these technological advances might take place.

  • The North Koreans have actually made more progress in the last two years than Western intelligence had expected.

  • So we had, we just prepare for for that outcome, and the Americans did not have a great deal of good options to respond to that very good options Are now heading towards possibly the military option.

  • I'm going well, either their preferred option was to work with China as their principal partner, China is the main trading partner, the country's most at stake in North Korea to try to get the Chinese to use their influence and pressure on North Korea.

  • Ideally franksy to change the leadership in Pyongyang at that short of that, to prevent the North Koreans making any further progress, but the what the Chinese are very cautious about precipitating a crisis in North Korea, that could lead to the collapse of the regime, they also don't want to have an American military strike against North Korea, so everyone's praying, or rather careful dance here to apply a bit more pressure on North Korea, but the sort of sanctions that the U.N. security Council could apply, are not going to have the strategic effect of leading the North Koreans in a different direction.

  • They are determined and set on developing the missile than nuclear weapons necessary to hold the United States at threat, because I think that's the only way to preserve their regime.

  • In the long term.

  • You say, everyone's playing very delicate dance, but surely the prison's not estates is far from delicate in this is obviously upset the Chinese by the way in which he's brought together issues of trade in North Korea.

  • He's antagonising people, he needs as allies.

  • How would you be advising the President, very unfair question, if You were the one trying to chart his foreign policy for him.

  • I don't think we should personalises too much on on President trump the reality is that every U.S. President since bill Clinton has faced a dilemma as to how to deal with North Korea and the military options, I've never been a tall attractive because of the vulnerability of America's allies in South Korea to a North Korean response, so United States always through through Clinton and Bush and Obama eras have looked to finding the gauchito she'd way forward, but that room for negotiation is coming to an end.

  • During this time, I think, with with President trump, he's obviously got to rely heavily on his military advisers, it's got some very good generals around him as his national security adviser is as defence Secretary, and I was his Chief of staff, and they will be weighing up those military options.

  • And, in general, urge it military chiefs, tend to be quite cautious about advocating war, because they know how difficult it can be, but equally, it's very, very difficult to for Americans to accept that their countries will be held at risk by volatile a regime like that of Kim Jong in North Korea, for the foreseeable future.

  • So we certainly can't rule out military action.

  • I think it's still some way off, they haven't yet demonstrated the they scope to miniaturise the nuclear warheads, so that they can reach the United States.

  • So you've got Some months, maybe a couple of years in which to get the Chinese to put the sort of pressure on North Korea, that could lead to a change of of approach is going to have to be very substantial pressure.

  • Indeed, and at the end of the day, the President's going to have to make a choice.

  • Is it going to challenge China and risk a confrontation with China as United States faced in the early nineteen fifties during the creagh wall, then, or is he going to join arms with the Chinese and try and between them to contain the threat, the North Korea poses for the fundamental difference here is that the Chinese come and live with a nuclear armed North Korea, the American so far have said they cannot live with a newt or a North Korea, and that is a big gap, which is going to prove extremely hard to bridge, you've talked about trying to keep the direct threat of nuclear weapons at arm's length, but the timescale.

  • Here is much shorter.

  • Sure, there is, say, with the Ron on a subject which you're very intimate.

  • I worked on it for so many years.

  • The threat posed by North Korea is much greater than any threat posed by, I think, in general, the threat of nuclear weapons in the world has has gone back up, whether it's in the South Asia in Russia's use of tactical nuclear weapons, or the threat from from North Korea developing this sort of capabilities.

  • Are you Ron, there is the threat is a bit different.

  • The nuclear agreements reached under President Obama is in is holding just about, for the moment, and as long as it's in place that will at least delay Iran's its scope to develop nuclear weapons.

  • The risk and me in the golf and the Persian Gulf is much more won over conventional clash between Iran and Saudi Arabia or between their proxies which could draw the United States in, I don't think it would be as far reaching as a clash over North Korea, which would bring China, United States potentially head to head, but those are the two big trouble spots in the world.

  • North Korea and Iran.

  • Sir John's sauce.

  • Thank you very much indeed.

  • We just like the proceedings to be brought against their former board members of kids company to have them disqualified as company.

  • Directors will Jonty bloom, a business correspondence, just joined us here, Jonty who's brought these proceedings.

  • This is the insolvency service, it's an independent Agency, and part of the Department for business, energy and industrial strategy, and basically they've been looking into the collapse of kids company, which is a charity based mainly in London, trying to help disadvantaged children, which went spectacularly bust in twenty fifteen it had enjoyed very high profile support from the government, and so on, but eventually, the government decided it was, it was withdrawing it support and the Charity, went to the wall.

  • Remind us of the problems that kids company has gone through.

  • I mean, you've talked about some of that, but they really went to the wall in a most spectacular way, yes, because, basically, they were very dependent on grants for the government about a fifth of their money came from the government, they had a lot of high profile support from some pretty famous people, large companies and, including the government was as high as the Prime Minister supported kids company, and it's very flamboyant founder and Chief executor negative Camilla my jelly, but it went bust very quickly and very suddenly when it baste, it turned out that they didn't have any reserves, and they were overspending the insolvency service is going to take these proceedings to the high Court, so it will be up to the Court to decide whether these people should be struck off as Directors, which means they won't be able to serve on the board of any company for a set number of years, and there are there are applying for having them suspended for between two and a half, and six years.

  • There are nine Directors ink and then Camilla back my jolly, who was no longer a Director, but who was basically running the organisation trying to blame.

  • Thank you very much indeed.

  • Now, who owns history.

  • And when, if ever should what B.B. be regarded as private material become public those questions are provoked by Growing calls for channel four to cancel a documentary, due to be shown next Sunday about Princess Diana.

  • The programme includes private footage of Diana very candidly talking about her failed marriage to Prince Charles, she was talking to a voice coach her brother Earl Spencer, says the tapes, should not be shown Princess Diana, apparently, described her wedding as the worst day of my life, and went on to describe her relationship with Prince Charles, the takes recorded during several sessions at Kensington Palace in nineteen ninety two and nineteen ninety three excerpts have been broadcasting lighted States, but never before here in Britain.

  • It's morning channel four's roughly spoke to b. b. c. five, what we have here is an extraordinary historical document, you know, Diana in her life.

  • Gave one sort of a long filmed interview.

  • We've all seen the panorama interview with Martin Bashir and other than that, there are really lengthy recordings are talking about herself and talking about our own life.

  • So, to be able to find three and a half or four hours of conversations, where she's talking about herself and effectively putting her own version of the story is an amazing historical document, and I think it allows us to create a new portrait Diana.

  • This is obviously something we gave a lot of thought and consideration to, it's not decision we take lightly, but in the end.

  • Twenty years have passed by, which is a significant amount of time to discuss These, this is with me.

  • Our Royal historian Sara grist wood and Camilla Tom any Royal correspondent for the Sunday express colour Tony first at the public expect unfettered access to the Royal family and to their intensely private lives.

  • I don't think unfettered.

  • Now, obviously, there are official engagements which you royals go on which correspondents, like me, cover.

  • In the old days, in the Diana days, there was far more of an infringement on the royals privacy.

  • For instance, you'd have journalists following them on their private holidays that no longer happens, I think, in the case of these tapes and, obviously, I've seen the documentary, because the Sunday.

  • Newspapers, wrote it all up.

  • Yesterday, there was a sense that, because they'd already been broadcasting, because actually the contents.

  • Isn't that surprising, it's nothing dissimilar from the Andrew Morton book, which Diana co operated with and, indeed, a lot of these videos had been on YouTube.

  • Because of their broadcast on N.B.C.. thirteen years ago, but a sense of many Janice in the room, myself included, asking channel four look are these now public property, because, clearly, when the Princess film than all those years ago, there was a sense that she thought it was going to remain private and that they weren't going to be publicly consumed and channels for argument, as you just stare pointed out in that interview with roughly this morning is that, well, you know, she's such a public figure, but these videos.

  • Now ought to be made public because of who she is.

  • And because it's the twentieth anniversary, and I think people watching the documentary might feel a bit uncomfortable with that argument.

  • Serra grist would Royal historian isn't all this simply an important part of history, which needs to become available doing stories, and perhaps to a wider public to allow a proper assessment, it's a question of when the past becomes history, isn't it.

  • It's, it's all about shades of grey.

  • On this one, and I, the waters have been muddied in several different ways.

  • Indeed, but the fact tapes, have been seen in America, a new tube by the fact, of course, that, but the Princes William and Harry have themselves been speaking more personally, they've broken the code of silence, if you like, as Diana did all those years ago, but end of the day, these tapes, weren't made for public distribution.

  • It's not panorama part two, and it's very hard to see where the public interest in the best sense lies, of course, there is public interest in the sense that, you know, there's a huge appetite for details about the Royal family in general and Diana, in particular, but do we really need to see these.

  • I'm not sure we do, but do, except I regressed with there isn't really a privacy case here, because the Princess herself, of course, he's dead.

  • No, I'm not sure the twenty years is enough to wipe that out.

  • If you think of all say copyright law.

  • What's that that's seventy years.

  • I mean, fifty years.

  • Seventeen years, yes, she's dead.

  • I think it's fairly generally accepted in in historical in legal terms.

  • In other situations that there does need to be a space of clear blue water, and I'm not sure there's been quite enough clear water here.

  • I mean, sorry, Camilla dominate, Matt.

  • Is there a risk that for those who think this is distasteful, or worse, this will simply increase public cynicism about journalists about the press, I think there's some cynicism.

  • Anyway.

  • Having said that, being in the Royal press packers, it's cooled and having been in it for the last decade.

  • I would actually argue that, at the moment, the royals are never afforded more privacy, they really are very respected in terms of their private time being theirs, and theirs alone, and I think if a paparazzi, for instance, turned up at Thorpe park and tried to get photographs of Prince George and Prince Charles at there.

  • Now, if it hadn't been authorised they'd get into big trouble in the Newspapers simply wouldn't publish it.

  • The other irony here is actually, while so called fleet street more or less minds, it's peace and Kew's these days, you do get television stations, wanting to run a lot of quite controversial footage, but equally at the moment.

  • The royals biggest enemy is the public themselves if Prince Harry goes out and about in Kensington high Street, he has to be a baseball cap on as an endangered not of being packed any more, but of being recorded by people with their mobile phones.

  • That's almost a bigger danger there did this did the power balance has somewhat shifted.

  • I've written a number of pieces in the Sunday excess express actually saying look when it comes to the Cambridge is wanting to be close as normal, a family as possible.

  • They do need to present themselves as normal parents, and not always this highly stage managed College polished image of Royal childhood, you know any working mother, who perhaps looks images of the Duchess of Cambridge, with her immaculately coiffured hair and Hawk poach could your dress with a baby on her hip looks at it and think that's not really what no working mother, it's all about that isn't normal.

  • It's not a normal image Camilla dominates her agus will have to stop you there.

  • Thank you both very much indeed Alistair's has been attempting to out to clarify the government's approach to immigration and freedom of movement.

  • After the U.K. leaves the European Union in March.

  • Twenty nineteen it follows reports, of course, have split in the cabinet or assistant political udders Norman Smith joins us Norman tell us more about what Downing street's been saying, where you sense Downing street after sort of days when we've had rival Ministers setting out their take on brakes, it has sought to regain control of the Whole bricks at agenda, insisting that the plan remains as set out by missus may, in her Lancaster House speech and in the Brecht's sit white paper, and specifically on this issue of freedom of movement, where there was a lot of common tree around the proposal from amber Rudd that E.U. migrants would still be able to come here for two years after we leave in March.

  • Twenty nineteen there. just have to register and the suggestion was that, actually, that was pretty much freedom of movement in all but name Downing street, this morning, saying, freedom of movement will end period after we leave, in other words, he's not going to be some freedom of movement light after we leave and also rebuffed thing, the idea, which was reported in the financial times that Philip Hammond, although he didn't say so publicly was privately supportive of the idea of an off the shelf, trade agreement with the, you know, that was seen as a nod towards a.

  • Norway type efter agreement number ten this morning, saying, forget about an off the shelf deal, we're not going to have that in broad terms, you sense number ten are trying to still the noises off and to re gather control over their breaks at agenda does this really squash stories, a split in the cabinet that cat's out of the bag.

  • I think it's very hard to come, for two reasons.

  • Really, one is the diminution in missus may's own Authority post the election result.

  • But the second is there remain very, very profound differences within the conservative party and the cabinet over Brecht's it between the ideologues who take the view that we need to leave to regain control of our sovereignty.

  • It's about the fundamental issue of democracy and the pragmatists who think our economic wellbeing must come first.

  • What is adding edge to it, I think, is because many in the former camper.

  • Leave those who are pressing for a longer gradual transitional process with a bigger voice for Brecht said, maybe aren't that interested in leaving the E.U.. at all.

  • In other words, their game, they believe he is to drag this out and out and out, so that in the end we hardly leave, and if we do leave, it's only a name, Norman Smith.

  • Thank you very much indeed.

  • Now, two years have passed since the peak of the refugee crisis in the summer of twenty fifteen time for the hundreds of thousands of people have come to Europe to find their feet, at least some of them, and for those countries to assess their decision to let them in a Budapest correspondent Nick Thorpe has travelled to Germany, visiting some of the refugees.

  • He met on the hungry border.

  • Two years ago, agus twenty fifteen of these station in Peter pressed the stand off between more than a thousand refugees camped out in the underpasses and the massed ranks of Hungarian police, preventing Them from entering the station and boarding trains for Germany.

  • Eventually they stood aside another never Sally from the Syrian capital, Damascus, among many others, made it to Berlin, I would say that the Germans are really nice.

  • And I think that, from the bottom of my heart, because from the first, they go through everything that happened in Germany, some people are very open minded and other people are, they're not racist, they're simply afraid never went to University before he left, Syria, and he's learned German quickly, he has refugee status, a full time job as an editor at a German Syrian film studio and a nice flat in the mob.

  • It district of Berlin, he has witnessed a cooling of the German welcome towards refugees, but says it just makes him try harder.

  • Those people only needed somebody to speak with, so they can understand, who is this guy, if he has some people as a media, I think, or they're all therapists, and they're all extremist and be aware of how much do you want stace iridium and how much do you want to become German, you cannot just simply kill everything like in a blink of an eye, and just say, O.K., I forgot everything I forgot the first in my school, and my friends and everything, and now.

  • P.M., German, because it's just not possible, and to leave everything behind like that, is that of freedom or a bird, I remember a song by Pink Floyd.

  • It's called, they wish you were here, they say, did they get you trade your he off at the ashes freedom for us, but what other options that we have, we had to go out.

  • Leave everything is that right.

  • It's not great, but you know the word is, I don't have an M.P., I can't, I've got a two burner here from Berlin, I took the train two hours North to the small town of bug to Hider to visit honey in or Abby, and her father, I first met them in a field on the, Hungary, Serbia border in August twenty fifteen they now live in a pleasant.

  • Second floor, flat ten minutes' walk from the station.

  • They were granted refugee status in Germany, in February.

  • Twenty sixteen just five months after they arrived, the government help.

  • If your shoes, and they Bay four lads, I'm Glenn, I'm getting ready for a walk or something.

  • It is overspend is saying, can be self sufficient can stand on their own feet.

  • What is it like to be Muslim in Germany today.

  • Yeah, they accept, they have a problem, there is some people they don't like a riff eulogies bud Meister.

  • That's, except I was like, what would the leather was either as one sorry my visit is taking place during the Muslim, Holy, month of Ramadan and invite me to share the breaking of the fast with them late that evening, you're good with you're yoghurt with The rice Moussa will soon take his first test in basic German, then he can pick up his old profession as Taylor or carpenter.

  • I mean, wants to study architecture at University back in Damascus.

  • Her mother, brother and sister are waiting for an interview at the German Embassy in Jordan, within six months, they hope they will be reunited in their new Nick thought reporting for us from Germany now England's women's football team have made history reaching a second major tournament semi final they beat the favourite France, one nil.

  • Last night at women's euro twenty seventeen in the Netherlands, it's just over a week since.

  • England's women won the cricket.

  • World Cup Wimbledon.

  • Britain's Joe conto reached the semi finals and draw down Wylie won her fourth wheelchair doubles title and judging by the coveted today's papers, it seems, media and public attention has never been so high.

  • So has women sports finally taken its place firmly in the mainstream Casey Stoney as one of the England footballers competing at the women's Euros.

  • I think I get in there.

  • I don't think we're both so yeah, I think there's been lots of positives.

  • I think if you look at female, for the moment, you say, successful and therefore, it's getting there.

  • Slowly, yes, get the lead your curry, yeah, I think it's a public don't give it the coverage should be back pages, along today, I want to be a true honest very not just Thomas Allman Case is Danny and Claire Connor captained the England cricket team and lead them to ashes victory.

  • She's now, the Director of the women's cricket at the England and Wales cricket board.

  • She spoke to me from Lords, a short time ago, the sea sink women.

  • Sport has finally got the recognition it deserves women.

  • Sport is in a very exciting place, and all of the things you've just described.

  • There certainly have captured the public's imagination.

  • This summer, still with the women's rugby.

  • World Cup to look forward to, I think before, there have been some kind of unhelpful comparisons between certainly women's team sports, with the men's equivalent.

  • So, I think, in the past, we've heard that the standard isn't good enough.

  • It's not fast enough.

  • It's not strong enough, or whatever it might be.

  • I think those comparisons are fading away.

  • Now in women's tennis.

  • For example, we don't hear that Venus Williams doesn't serve as fast as Andy Murray, and we don't hear that Laura Trott doesn't cycle as fast as Chris hoy, therefore, she's less good, I think women's team sport has suffered from those comparisons.

  • Traditionally, and I think that they're fading.

  • Now, I think we're seeing some unbelievable performances with huge entertainment value in women's sport at the moment.

  • I'm looking out over an empty Lourdes with a bit of ground work going on at the moment, but to picture this ground eight days ago, completely full and shaking with energy and fervour For a women's cricket.

  • World Cup final was was an amazing sight, without taking you away from all the individual achievements of the women across sport, you've achieved so much is this, partly due to a national strategy or increases in funding, which is help.

  • Yes, it is part of a strategy.

  • It's part of an icy sea strategy Anthony C.B. strategy for that, for the game, which came together in a lovely month of of successful moments, I guess the E.C. be strategy has been around growing, the women's and girl's game for a number of years, lots of things aligned.

  • I think certainly ici ce as well deciding quite late on in the strategy to make sure that every single game was broadcast of this women's world Cup, so the visibility.

  • I think of the tournament and of the players, coupled with some really exciting participation strategies came together really nicely now.

  • Can I come of the chicken and egg question, which came first, the increased media coverage driving public demand for more was at the public demand, which grew the media coverage, I think it was the public demand.

  • Actually, I think certainly sky and radio and other broadcasters that icy sea will work with realised that there was an appetite.

  • I think it was that way round that, and I think it's been the public awareness and public demand that is really driving the decisions around media, the media exposure as well.

  • Do you still detect Prejudice male prejudice against women.

  • Sport, or do you think that's another game you've already won.

  • No, I don't think that we've we've really cracked that I still, I think there are, along with me, you know, in many kind of attitudes.

  • There are there are pockets of prejudice, was that the word you used, yeah, I think there are still pockets of that around women sport.

  • So I think there is still some way to go, but I think we have seen something quite transformational over this last year, and I think that those bad attitudes are starting to diminish, and I think I'll go back to one of my original point, I think women's sport is standing on its own two feet.

  • More and more, and is being appreciated and respected for what it is, and I think that has won over the hearts and minds of many men who maybe did have those less than positive beliefs.

  • In the past, you've described a positive momentum.

  • Can it be maintained, it must be maintained, and that's our job.

  • Now, and there's been lots of talk about this tournament, being a game changer for women's sport, but even more broadly than just for women's cricket, I think, clearly, you've already said, we're in a very exciting summer, and I think it's incumbent on all of us to make sure that the momentum.

  • Absolutely, it's maintained and accelerates from here, clack on a former England cricket Captain in Flanders fields.

  • It's been a day for her grandchildren and great grandchildren.

  • Many of them, who have gathered to honour family members, they never met some of the hundreds of thousands who died in the battle of passion.

  • Dale.

  • One hundred years ago, the King of Belgium and Prince Charles are among those taking part in an act of commemoration at the Tyne cot cemetery near heap, I correspondent Johnny diamond is there, James, there can be few more sombre places in the world today than this one Tyne cot cemetery, the last resting place of twelve thousand men, the record of thirty four thousand more whose remains were never found under blue skies interrupted by fluffy white clouds dignitaries and relatives gathered the backdrop, the breathtaking sight of row upon row of immaculately kept white headstones looks Eterna by Edward Elgar was sung by the national youth choir of Scott tradition dictates much at these ceremonies.

  • But this morning, there was a renewed emphasis on individuals and their stories, and a reminder that this was not just a British battle, not just an allied battle.

  • This was part of a world war, the reading of names came first private James Monroe one sod off again invent it, she didn't order grid, the earth off September nineteen seventeen private Edward Michael that thirteenth platoon d. company forty fifth Battalion Australian Imperial force a grazier from new South Wales, aged forty second Lieutenant Frederick a military cross seventeenth service Battalion of the Royal Irish rifles killed in action.

  • Flying over enemy lines near it, then a reminder that the war was felt back home to a letter from missus Ernie gaze enquiring after her son, who had fallen in battle.

  • I thank you for sending us word of how our dear Ernest died.

  • It is dreadful.

  • There to lose our dear boy in this way, we would not believe it until we had the letter from someone who saw him, did you see my boy.

  • After he died, could you tell us how he was, I should like to know what time of the day or night, it happened, or thereabouts, and from Captain all of us are sick of the German defence forces, a letter from an unknown German Officer after crawling out, it was a bleeding remands of my comrades and to smoke and to breed and wandering and fleeing into myself the raging there Terry fire in search of refuge.

  • I know awaiting desks at any moment.

  • You don't know what Flanders means Flanders means endless endurance fitness means blood and scraps of human bodies flame.

  • This means carriage and faithfulness today, Prince Charles reminded those gathered of some of the bloody history of the land upon which they stood the advance was slow and every inch was hard fought the land.

  • We stand upon was taken two months into the battle by the third Australian division, it would change hands twice again before the end of the war, the Prime Minister gave a reading and then in front of the great stone plinth of the cemetery engraved with the words, their name liveth for ever more the Exhortation was red, they shall grow not old as we that are left grow old age, shall not weary them, nor the years condemn at the going down of the sun, and in the morning, we will remember them flags were lowered as the last post was played heads were bowed in the sunshine.

  • As for two minutes.

  • The crowd stood in silence and contemplated the catastrophe of war reeds were laid at the foot of the plinth, and from the West came the Belgian air force a flypast in tribute to the missing Johnny diamond describing from time a day of passionate emotional memory and that brings us to today's closing headlines, so John sores, or used to be the head of m. i. six told this programme, United States President needs to make a strategic decision over how he handles North Korea, the end of the day, the President's going to have to make a choice.

  • Is it going to challenge China and risk a confrontation with China as United States faced in the early nineteen fifties during the creagh wall, then, or is he going to sort of join arms with the Chinese and try and between them to contain the threat, the North Korea poses for the fundamental difference here is that the Chinese come live with a Nuclear armed North Korea, the American so far have said they cannot live with a newt or a North Korea, the headlines Downing street, has been trying to clarify the government's approach to freedom of movement.

  • Once the U.K. leaves the European Union in March.

  • Twenty nineteen Downing street insists there's been no change on the policy set up by Theresa may, at the start of the year, the insolvency service, says it's beginning proceedings against former board members of the kids company charity to have them disqualified as company.

  • Directors, the weather, a mixture of sunshine and showers with rain becoming heavier later in northern and Western areas of the U.K..

  • P.M. is at five.